New York School Discipline Laws & Regulations: Grounds for Suspension or Expulsion

Discipline Compendium

New York School Discipline Laws & Regulations: Grounds for Suspension or Expulsion

Category: Exclusionary Discipline: Suspension, Expulsion, and Alternative Placement
Subcategory: Grounds for Suspension or Expulsion
State: New York

The state or jurisdiction(s) you selected for this subcategory are shown below, followed by the laws and regulations. To add or change states, use the Back button and resubmit your search request.

To view a state profile showing school discipline laws and regulations in all subcategories for a given state, click on the state name.

New in 2023

LAWS

201.1. Purpose

The purpose of this Part is to implement the procedural protections of paragraph g of subdivision 3 of section 3214 and subdivision 1 of section 4404 of the Education Law relating to student discipline by coordinating the general procedures for suspension of students under Education Law, section 3214 with the requirements of section 615(k) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. section 1415[k]) and the Federal regulations implementing such statute.

201.7 General procedures for suspensions and removals of students with disabilities.

(b) Five school day suspension or removal.

Except as otherwise provided in subdivision (d) of this section, the trustees or board of education of any school district, a district superintendent of schools or a building principal with authority to suspend students pursuant to Education Law, section 3214(3)(b) and (g), shall have authority to order the placement of a student with a disability into an appropriate interim alternative educational setting, another setting or suspension for a period not to exceed five consecutive school days, and not to exceed the amount of time that a nondisabled student would be subject to suspension for the same behavior.

(c) Ten school day suspension or removal.

Except as otherwise provided in subdivision (d) of this section, a superintendent of schools, either directly or upon recommendation of a hearing officer designated to conduct a superintendent's hearing pursuant to Education Law, section 3214(3)(c) and (g), may order the placement of a student with a disability into an interim alternative educational setting, another setting or suspension for up to 10 consecutive school days, inclusive of any period in which the student has been suspended or removed pursuant to subdivision (b) of this section for the same behavior, where the superintendent determines in accordance with the procedures set forth in Education Law section 3214(3)(c) that the student has engaged in behavior that warrants a suspension, provided that the duration of any such suspension or removal shall not exceed the amount of time that a nondisabled student would be subject to suspension for the same behavior. Except as otherwise provided in subdivision (d) of this section, a superintendent of schools may order additional suspensions of not more than 10 consecutive school days in the same school year for separate incidents of misconduct.

3214. Student placement, suspensions and transfers.

3. Suspension of a pupil.

a. The board of education, board of trustees or sole trustee, the superintendent of schools, district superintendent of schools or principal of a school may suspend the following pupils from required attendance upon instruction:

A pupil who is insubordinate or disorderly or violent or disruptive, or whose conduct otherwise endangers the safety, morals, health or welfare of others.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

American Institutes for Research

U.S. Department of Education

The contents of the National Center on Safe Supportive Learning Environments Web site were assembled under contracts from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Safe and Supportive Schools to the American Institutes for Research (AIR), Contract Number  91990021A0020.

This Web site is operated and maintained by AIR. The contents of this Web site do not necessarily represent the policy or views of the U.S. Department of Education nor do they imply endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education.

©2024 American Institutes for Research — Disclaimer   |   Privacy Policy   |   Accessibility Statement