Ohio School Discipline Laws & Regulations: School Resource Officer (SRO) or School Security Officer (SSO) Training or Certification

Discipline Compendium

Ohio School Discipline Laws & Regulations: School Resource Officer (SRO) or School Security Officer (SSO) Training or Certification

Category: Partnerships between Schools and Law Enforcement
Subcategory: School Resource Officer (SRO) or School Security Officer (SSO) Training or Certification
State: Ohio

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LAWS

3313.951. Qualifications for school resource officers.

(B)(1) A school resource officer who provides services to a school district or school on or after November 2, 2018, shall, except as described in division (B)(2) of this section, satisfy both of the following conditions:

(a) Complete a basic training program approved by the Ohio peace officer training commission, as described in division (B)(1) of section 109.77 of the Revised Code;

(b) Complete at least forty hours of school resource officer training within one year after appointment to provide those services through one of the following entities, as approved by the Ohio peace officer training commission:

(i) The national association of school resource officers;

(ii) The Ohio school resource officer association;

(iii) The Ohio peace officer training academy.

(2) A school resource officer who is appointed to provide services to a school district or school prior to November 2, 2018, shall be exempt from compliance with the training requirements prescribed in division (B)(1)(b) of this section.

(3) A certified training program provided by an entity described in division (B)(1)(b) of this section shall include instruction regarding skills, tactics, and strategies necessary to address the specific nature of all of the following:

(a) School campuses;

(b) School building security needs and characteristics;

(c) The nuances of law enforcement functions conducted inside a school environment, including:

(i) Understanding the psychological and physiological characteristics consistent with the ages of the students in the assigned building or buildings;

(ii) Understanding the appropriate role of school resource officers regarding discipline and reducing the number of referrals to juvenile court; and

(iii) Understanding the use of developmentally appropriate interview, interrogation, de-escalation, and behavior management strategies.

(d) The mechanics of being a positive role model for youth, including appropriate communication techniques which enhance interactions between the school resource officer and students;

(e) Providing assistance on topics such as classroom management tools to provide law-related education to students and methods for managing the behaviors sometimes associated with educating children with special needs;

(f) The mechanics of the laws regarding compulsory attendance, as set forth in Chapter 3321. of the Revised Code;

(g) Identifying the trends in drug use, eliminating the instance of drug use, and encouraging a drug-free environment in schools.

(4) The Ohio peace officer training commission shall adopt rules, in accordance with Chapter 119. of the Revised Code, for the approval of school resource officer training provided by an entity described in division (B)(1)(b) of this section.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

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