The Relationship Between Bullying and Other Forms of Youth Violence and Substance Abuse

Event Date
Add to Calendar 2013-05-22 16:00:00 2013-05-22 16:00:00 The Relationship Between Bullying and Other Forms of Youth Violence and Substance Abuse DESCRIPTION: The issue of bullying is of growing concern in schools across the U.S. Recent research highlights the overlap between bullying and other forms of youth violence, including gang involvement, as well as behavioral health risks, such as substance use. Bullying not only creates a poor school climate for students but also negatively affects the work environment for school staff. In this Webinar we reviewed recent research linking bullying involvement, as both a target and a perpetrator, with other forms of youth violence and substance use. We discussed different sources of data that may be informative in assessing bullying and related behavioral and mental health risks in schools. We also summarized different research-based strategies and resources that schools can use to address the inter-related concerns of bullying and youth violence. LEARNING OBJECTIVES: As a result of participating in this session, participants were able to: •Identify risk factors for youth involvement in bullying, violence, and gangs; •Identify different sources of data which will be instructive in determining youth risk for involvement in violence and bullying; and •Describe specific action steps to address concerns about bullying and related behavioral and violence-related problems in the school. AUDIENCE: This Webinar is appropriate for school district superintendents and allied staff, school administrators and support staff, school climate teams, student support personnel and all teaching staff. PRESENTER: Catherine Bradshaw, PhD, Deputy Director, Johns Hopkins Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence noreply@air.org America/New_York public

DESCRIPTION

The issue of bullying is of growing concern in schools across the U.S. Recent research highlights the overlap between bullying and other forms of youth violence, including gang involvement, as well as behavioral health risks, such as substance use. Bullying not only creates a poor school climate for students but also negatively affects the work environment for school staff.

In this Webinar we reviewed recent research linking bullying involvement, as both a target and a perpetrator, with other forms of youth violence and substance use. We discussed different sources of data that may be informative in assessing bullying and related behavioral and mental health risks in schools. We also summarized different research-based strategies and resources that schools can use to address the inter-related concerns of bullying and youth violence.
 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

As a result of participating in this session, participants were able to:

•Identify risk factors for youth involvement in bullying, violence, and gangs;
•Identify different sources of data which will be instructive in determining youth risk for involvement in violence and bullying; and
•Describe specific action steps to address concerns about bullying and related behavioral and violence-related problems in the school.
AUDIENCE: This Webinar is appropriate for school district superintendents and allied staff, school administrators and support staff, school climate teams, student support personnel and all teaching staff.

PRESENTER

Catherine Bradshaw, PhD, Deputy Director, Johns Hopkins Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence

WEBINAR MATERIALS

View the webinar recording

Download the presentation slides

Questions and Answers


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