Safer Campuses and Communities: Tools for Implementing Evidence-based Interventions to Reduce Alcohol Problems

Event Date
Add to Calendar 2013-06-26 16:00:00 2013-06-26 16:00:00 Safer Campuses and Communities: Tools for Implementing Evidence-based Interventions to Reduce Alcohol Problems DESCRIPTION: High-risk alcohol consumption remains the greatest problem for most college campuses, associated with an estimated 1,825 alcohol-related student deaths, 599,000 student injuries, and 97,000 student sexual assaults or date rapes each year. As such, campuses and communities across the country have been working to reduce alcohol misuse and related consequences.  Based on a translation research project funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), the Prevention Research Center developed a suite of Safer Campuses and Communities resources, including background materials, tools, and procedures to help campuses and communities develop and implement targeted interventions for alcohol problem prevention. The resources can help change the culture of dangerous drinking and related problems, and ultimately improve the quality of learning environment for students, protecting the health and safety of students and community members alike. In this webinar, Dr. Bob Saltz, Senior Research Scientist at the Prevention Research Center, will review the latest research-based approaches to reducing alcohol-related problems among college students and consider how to apply the Safer Campuses and Communities resources recently developed. Then this webinar will feature a college that has been implementing evidence-based interventions to reduce alcohol problems on its campus and community. Future webinars in the Higher Education Series will focus on other substance abuse and mental health issues of particular interest to the higher education field. LEARNING OBJECTIVES: As a result of participating in this session, participants will be able to: Describe effective evidence-based strategies to reduce alcohol problems, Identify specific strategies they could employ in their own campus setting, and Access materials to advance evidence-based strategies to reduce specific alcohol related problems and protect the health and safety of students and community members AUDIENCE: This webinar is appropriate for campus and community members interested in or involved with reducing alcohol-related problems within the campus community. This would include higher education administrators, faculty and staff, prevention coordinators, campus and community law enforcement, and community leaders and residents. PRESENTER: Bob Saltz, Ph.D., Associate Director, Prevention Research Center To register, go to http://safesupportivelearning.ed.gov/index.php?id=1580. noreply@air.org America/New_York public

Description

High-risk alcohol consumption remains the greatest problem for most college campuses, associated with an estimated 1,825 alcohol-related student deaths, 599,000 student injuries, and 97,000 student sexual assaults or date rapes each year. As such, campuses and communities across the country have been working to reduce alcohol misuse and related consequences. 

Based on a translational research project funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), the Prevention Research Center developed a suite of Safer Campuses and Communities resources, including background materials, tools, and procedures to help campuses and communities develop and implement targeted interventions for alcohol problem prevention. The resources can help change the culture of dangerous drinking and related problems, and ultimately improve the quality of learning environment for students, protecting the health and safety of students and community members alike.

Presenters

In this webinar, Dr. Bob Saltz, Senior Research Scientist at the Prevention Research Center, reviewed the latest research-based approaches to reducing alcohol-related problems among college students and considered how to apply the Safer Campuses and Communities resources recently developed. Then Karen Hughes, Coordinator of PartySafe@Cal at UC Berkeley, and Genie Cheng, Outreach and Education Coordinator at UC Santa Barbara, shared how their colleges have been implementing evidence-based interventions to reduce alcohol problems on their campuses and in their communities.

Future webinars in the Higher Education Series will focus on other substance abuse and mental health issues of particular interest to the higher education field.

Learning Objectives

As a result of participating in this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe effective evidence-based strategies to reduce alcohol problems,
  • Identify specific strategies they could employ in their own campus setting, and
  • Access materials to advance evidence-based strategies to reduce specific alcohol related problems and protect the health and safety of students and community members

Audience

This webinar is appropriate for campus and community members interested in or involved with reducing alcohol-related problems within the campus community. This would include higher education administrators, faculty and staff, prevention coordinators, campus and community law enforcement, and community leaders and residents.

Webinar Materials

View the webinar recording (FLV)

Download the presentation slides (PDF)

Questions and Answers (PDF)

 


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