Supporting Children of Incarcerated Parents in School

Event Date
Add to Calendar 2019-02-27 14:00:00 2019-02-27 14:00:00 Supporting Children of Incarcerated Parents in School Currently, more than 2.7 million children in the U.S. have an incarcerated parent; that is 1 in 28 school-aged children. [1] Furthermore, approximately 10 million children have experienced parental incarceration at some point in their lives. [2] Having a parent in prison can impact a child’s mental health, social behavior, health, and educational performance. [3] The second ND Prevention webinar for FY 2018-19 will focus on the needs of children who have a parent who is incarcerated. The presenters will concentrate on how schools and school personnel can support the child, his/her caregiver and parent in a positive manner. During this webinar we will:  Highlight national data on students impacted by incarceration and dispel multiple myths; Identify prominent frameworks, practices and strategies; Describe the kinds of supports and services children with incarcerated parents can benefit from; Provide an opportunity to hear from a child and parent perspective; and, Discuss next steps and our upcoming follow-up web-based discussion. Presenters: Ann Adalist-Estrin, Director, National Resource Center on Children and Families of the Incarcerated Tanya Krupat, Program Director, The Osborne Association Juliette-Marie deSousa, Senior Researcher, American Institutes for Research   Register for the webinar here. [1] The Pew Charitable Trusts: Pew Center on the States. Collateral Costs: Incarceration’s Effect on Economic Mobility. Washington, DC. 2010 [2] National Resource Center on Children & Families of the Incarcerated. (2014). Children and Families of the Incarcerated Fact Sheet. Rutgers University. [3] Turney, K., Goodsell, R. (2018). Parental Incarceration and Children’s Wellbeing. ERIC. noreply@air.org America/New_York public

Currently, more than 2.7 million children in the U.S. have an incarcerated parent; that is 1 in 28 school-aged children. [1] Furthermore, approximately 10 million children have experienced parental incarceration at some point in their lives. [2] Having a parent in prison can impact a child’s mental health, social behavior, health, and educational performance. [3] The second ND Prevention webinar for FY 2018-19 will focus on the needs of children who have a parent who is incarcerated. The presenters will concentrate on how schools and school personnel can support the child, his/her caregiver and parent in a positive manner.
During this webinar we: 

  • Highlighted national data on students impacted by incarceration and dispel multiple myths;
  • Identified prominent frameworks, practices and strategies;
  • Described the kinds of supports and services children with incarcerated parents can benefit from;
  • Provided an opportunity to hear from a child and parent perspective; and,
  • Discussed next steps and our upcoming follow-up web-based discussion.

Presenters

  • Ann Adalist-Estrin, Director, National Resource Center on Children and Families of the Incarcerated
  • Tanya Krupat, Program Director, The Osborne Association
  • Juliette-Marie deSousa, Senior Researcher, American Institutes for Research

Webinar Materials

You can access the archived webinar recording here.

[1] The Pew Charitable Trusts: Pew Center on the States. Collateral Costs: Incarceration’s Effect on Economic Mobility. Washington, DC. 2010

[2] National Resource Center on Children & Families of the Incarcerated. (2014). Children and Families of the Incarcerated Fact Sheet. Rutgers University.

[3] Turney, K., Goodsell, R. (2018). Parental Incarceration and Children’s Wellbeing. ERIC.


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