WEEAC Session 1: Data to Identify Patterns of Inequity

Event Date
- Add to Calendar 2023-02-17 15:00:00 2023-02-17 16:30:00 WEEAC Session 1: Data to Identify Patterns of Inequity Chronic absence–which includes absences that are excused, unexcused, or due to suspensions–is a leading indicator of inequity. When chronic absence occurs, it is a sign of challenges inside and outside schools (e.g. unstable housing, unreliable transportation, historical trauma, disengaging educational experiences, bullying) that not only cause absences but also affect children’s ability to learn overall if they are left unaddressed. This session will focus on examples of disaggregated chronic absence data from states and districts that help participants see where systemic issues are having a disproportionate impact on specific student groups. Online Online noreply@air.org America/New_York public

Chronic absence–which includes absences that are excused, unexcused, or due to suspensions–is a leading indicator of inequity. When chronic absence occurs, it is a sign of challenges inside and outside schools (e.g. unstable housing, unreliable transportation, historical trauma, disengaging educational experiences, bullying) that not only cause absences but also affect children’s ability to learn overall if they are left unaddressed.

This session will focus on examples of disaggregated chronic absence data from states and districts that help participants see where systemic issues are having a disproportionate impact on specific student groups.


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