Minnesota

To view this state’s school discipline laws and regulations, scroll to a subcategory of interest and select “Laws and Regulations.”

Regulation Set
Major Category
General Provisions
Sub Category
Authority to develop and establish rules of conduct
Statute

LAWS

121A.031. School student bullying policy.

3. Local district and school policy.

(a) Districts and schools, in consultation with students, parents, and community organizations, to the extent practicable, shall adopt, implement, and, on a cycle consistent with other district policies, review, and revise where appropriate, a written policy to prevent and prohibit student bullying consistent with this section. The policy must conform with sections 121A.41 to 121A.56. A district or school must adopt and implement a local policy under subdivisions 3 to 5 or comply with the provisions of the state model policy in subdivision 6.

121A.55. Policies to be established.

(a) The commissioner of education shall promulgate guidelines to assist each school board to establish uniform criteria for dismissal and adopt written policies and rules to effectuate sections 121A.031 and 121A.40. to 121A.56. The policies shall emphasize preventing dismissals through early detection of problems and be designed to prevent students' inappropriate behavior from recurring. The policies shall recognize the continuing responsibility of the school to educate the pupil during the dismissal period. The alternative educational services, if the pupil wishes to take advantage of them, must be adequate to allow the pupil to make progress towards meeting the graduation standards adopted under section 120B.02 and help prepare the pupil for readmission.

(b) An area learning center under section 123A.05 may not prohibit an expelled or excluded pupil from enrolling solely because a district expelled or excluded the pupil. The board of the area learning center may use the provisions of the Pupil Fair Dismissal Act to exclude a pupil or to require an admission plan.

(c) Each school district shall develop a policy and report it to the commissioner on the appropriate use of peace officers and crisis teams to remove students who have an individualized education program from school grounds.

121A.61. Discipline and removal of students from class.

1. Required policy. Each school board must adopt a written districtwide school discipline policy which includes written rules of conduct for students, minimum consequences for violations of the rules, and grounds and procedures for removal of a student from class. The policy must be developed in consultation with administrators, teachers, employees, pupils, parents, community members, law enforcement agencies, county attorney offices, social service agencies, and such other individuals or organizations as the board determines appropriate. A school site council may adopt additional provisions to the policy subject to the approval of the school board.

121A.69. Hazing policy.

3. School board policy. Each school board shall adopt a written policy governing student or staff hazing. The policy must apply to student behavior that occurs on or off school property and during and after school hours and be consistent with section 121A.031. The policy must include reporting procedures and disciplinary consequences for violating the policy. Disciplinary consequences must be sufficiently severe to deter violations and appropriately discipline prohibited behavior. Disciplinary consequences must conform with sections 121A.031 and 121A.41. to 121A.56. Each school must include the policy in the student handbook on school policies.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Scope
Statute

LAWS

121A.031. School student bullying policy.

1. Student bullying policy; scope and application.

(a) This section applies to bullying by a student against another student enrolled in a public school and which occurs:

(1) on the school premises, at the school functions or activities, or on the school transportation;

(2) by use of electronic technology and communications on the school premises, during the school functions or activities, on the school transportation, or on the school computers, networks, forums, and mailing lists; or

(3) by use of electronic technology and communications off the school premises to the extent such use substantially and materially disrupts student learning or the school environment.

(b) A nonpublic school under section 123B.41, subdivision 9, consistent with its school accreditation cycle, is encouraged to electronically transmit to the commissioner its antibullying policy, if any, and any summary data on its bullying incidents.

(c) This section does not apply to a home school under sections 120A.22, subdivision 4, and 120A.24, or a nonpublic school under section 123B.41, subdivision 9.

(d) A school-aged child who voluntarily participates in a public school activity, such as a cocurricular or extracurricular activity, is subject to the same student bullying policy provisions applicable to the public school students participating in the activity.

121A.69. Hazing policy.

3. School board policy. Each school board shall adopt a written policy governing student or staff hazing. The policy must apply to student behavior that occurs on or off school property and during and after school hours and be consistent with section 121A.031. The policy must include reporting procedures and disciplinary consequences for violating the policy. Disciplinary consequences must be sufficiently severe to deter violations and appropriately discipline prohibited behavior. Disciplinary consequences must conform with sections 121A.031 and 121A.41. to 121A.56. Each school must include the policy in the student handbook on school policies.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Communication of policy
Statute

LAWS

121A.03. Model policy.

2. Sexual, religious, and racial harassment and violence policy. A school board must adopt a written sexual, religious, and racial harassment and sexual, religious, and racial violence policy that conforms with chapter 363A. The policy shall apply to pupils, teachers, administrators, and other school personnel, include reporting procedures, and set forth disciplinary actions that will be taken for violation of the policy. Disciplinary actions must conform with collective bargaining agreements and sections 121A.41 to 121A.56. The policy must be conspicuously posted throughout each school building, given to each district employee and independent contractor at the time of entering into the person's employment contract, and included in each school's student handbook on school policies. Each school must develop a process for discussing the school's sexual, religious, and racial harassment and violence policy with students and school employees.

121A.031. School student bullying policy.

3. Local district and school policy.

(b) Each local district and school policy must establish research-based, developmentally appropriate best practices that include preventive and remedial measures and effective discipline for deterring policy violations; apply throughout the school or district; and foster active student, parent, and community participation. A district or school may request assistance from the school safety technical assistance center under section 127A.052 in complying with local policy requirements. The policy shall:

(4) be conspicuously posted in the administrative offices of the school and school district in summary form;

(5) be given to each school employee and independent contractor, if a contractor regularly interacts with students, at the time of employment with the district or school;

(6) be included in the student handbook on school policies; and

(7) be available to all parents and other school community members in an electronic format in the languages appearing on the district or school Web site, consistent with the district policies and practices.

(c) Consistent with its applicable policies and practices, each district and school under this subdivision must discuss its policy with students, school personnel, and volunteers and provide appropriate training for all school personnel to prevent, identify, and respond to prohibited conduct. Districts and schools must establish a training cycle, not to exceed a period of three school years, for school personnel under this paragraph. Newly employed school personnel must receive the training within the first year of their employment with the district or school. A district or school administrator may accelerate the training cycle or provide additional training based on a particular need or circumstance.

(d) Each district and school under this subdivision must submit an electronic copy of its prohibited conduct policy to the commissioner.

121A.0311. Notice of the rights and responsibilities of students and parents under the Safe and Supportive Minnesota Schools Act.

A district or school subject to section 121A.031 must include in the student discipline policy it distributes or otherwise transmits to students and their parents annually at the beginning of each school year notice about the rights and responsibilities of students and their parents under the Safe and Supportive Minnesota Schools Act.

121A.61. Discipline and removal of students from class.

3. Policy components. The policy must include at least the following components:

(a) rules governing student conduct and procedures for informing students of the rules;

121A.69. Hazing policy.

3. School board policy. Each school board shall adopt a written policy governing student or staff hazing. The policy must apply to student behavior that occurs on or off school property and during and after school hours and be consistent with section 121A.031. The policy must include reporting procedures and disciplinary consequences for violating the policy. Disciplinary consequences must be sufficiently severe to deter violations and appropriately discipline prohibited behavior. Disciplinary consequences must conform with sections 121A.031 and 121A.41. to 121A.56. Each school must include the policy in the student handbook on school policies.

121A.72. School locker policy.

2. Dissemination. The locker policy must be disseminated to parents and students in the way that other policies of general application to students are disseminated. A copy of the policy must be provided to a student the first time that the student is given the use of a locker.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Major Category
In-School Discipline
Sub Category
Use of multi-tiered discipline approaches
Statute

No relevant laws or regulations found.

Sub Category
Teacher authority to remove students from classrooms
Statute

LAWS

121A.60. Definitions.

1. Removal from class. "Removal from class" and "removal" mean any actions taken by a teacher, principal, or other school district employee to prohibit a pupil from attending a class or activity period for a period of time not to exceed five days, pursuant to procedures established in the school district discipline policy adopted by the school board pursuant to section 121A.61.

2. Class period. "Class period" or "activity period" means a period of time as defined in the district's written discipline policy.

121A.61. Discipline and removal of students from class.

1. Required policy. Each school board must adopt a written districtwide school discipline policy which includes written rules of conduct for students, minimum consequences for violations of the rules, and grounds and procedures for removal of a student from class. The policy must be developed in consultation with administrators, teachers, employees, pupils, parents, community members, law enforcement agencies, county attorney offices, social service agencies, and such other individuals or organizations as the board determines appropriate. A school site council may adopt additional provisions to the policy subject to the approval of the school board.

2. Grounds for removal from class. The policy must establish the various grounds for which a student may be removed from a class in the district for a period of time under the procedures specified in the policy. The policy must include a procedure for notifying and meeting with a student's parent or guardian to discuss the problem that is causing the student to be removed from class after the student has been removed from class more than ten times in one school year. The grounds in the policy must include at least the following provisions as well as other grounds determined appropriate by the board:

(a) willful conduct that significantly disrupts the rights of others to an education, including conduct that interferes with a teacher's ability to teach or communicate effectively with students in a class or with the ability of other students to learn;

(b) willful conduct that endangers surrounding persons, including school district employees, the student or other students, or the property of the school; and

(c) willful violation of any rule of conduct specified in the discipline policy adopted by the board.

3. Policy components. The policy must include at least the following components:

(a) rules governing student conduct and procedures for informing students of the rules;

(b) the grounds for removal of a student from a class;

(c) the authority of the classroom teacher to remove students from the classroom pursuant to procedures and rules established in the district's policy;

(d) the procedures for removal of a student from a class by a teacher, school administrator, or other school district employee;

(e) the period of time for which a student may be removed from a class, which may not exceed five class periods for a violation of a rule of conduct;

(f) provisions relating to the responsibility for and custody of a student removed from a class;

(g) the procedures for return of a student to the specified class from which the student has been removed;

(h) the procedures for notifying a student and the student's parents or guardian of violations of the rules of conduct and of resulting disciplinary actions;

(i) any procedures determined appropriate for encouraging early involvement of parents or guardians in attempts to improve a student's behavior;

(j) any procedures determined appropriate for encouraging early detection of behavioral problems;

(k) any procedures determined appropriate for referring a student in need of special education services to those services;

(l) the procedures for consideration of whether there is a need for a further assessment or of whether there is a need for a review of the adequacy of a current individualized education program of a student with a disability who is removed from class;

(m) procedures for detecting and addressing chemical abuse problems of a student while on the school premises;

(n) the minimum consequences for violations of the code of conduct;

(o) procedures for immediate and appropriate interventions tied to violations of the code;

(p) a provision that states that a teacher, school employee, school bus driver, or other agent of a district may use reasonable force in compliance with section 121A.582 and other laws;

(q) an agreement regarding procedures to coordinate crisis services to the extent funds are available with the county board responsible for implementing sections 245.487 to 245.4889 for students with a serious emotional disturbance or other students who have an individualized education program whose behavior may be addressed by crisis intervention; and

(r) a provision that states a student must be removed from class immediately if the student engages in assault or violent behavior. For purposes of this paragraph, "assault" has the meaning given it in section 609.02, subdivision 10. The removal shall be for a period of time deemed appropriate by the principal, in consultation with the teacher.

122A.42. General control of schools.

(a) The teacher of record shall have the general control and government of the school and classroom. When more than one teacher is employed in any district, one of the teachers may be designated by the board as principal and shall have the general control and supervision of the schools of the district, subject to the general supervisory control of the board and other officers.

(b) Consistent with paragraph (a), the teacher may remove students from class under section 121A.61, subdivision 2, for violent or disruptive conduct.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Alternatives to suspension
Statute

LAWS

121A.45. Grounds for dismissal.

(1) No school shall dismiss any pupil without attempting to provide alternative educational services before dismissal proceedings, except where it appears that the pupil will create an immediate and substantial danger to self or to surrounding persons or property.

121A.575. Alternatives to pupil suspension.

Notwithstanding any law to the contrary and in accordance with sections 121A.40. to 121A.56, after a school administration notifies a pupil of the grounds for suspension, the school administration may, instead of imposing the suspension, do one or more of the following:

(1) strongly encourage a parent or guardian of the pupil to attend school with the pupil for one day;

(2) assign the pupil to attend school on Saturday as supervised by the principal or the principal's designee; and

(3) petition the juvenile court that the student is in need of services under chapter 260C.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Use of corporal punishment
Statute

LAWS

121A.58. Corporal punishment.

1. Definition. For the purpose of this section, "corporal punishment" means conduct involving:

(1) hitting or spanking a person with or without an object; or

(2) unreasonable physical force that causes bodily harm or substantial emotional harm.

2. Corporal punishment not allowed. An employee or agent of a district shall not inflict corporal punishment or cause corporal punishment to be inflicted upon a pupil to reform unacceptable conduct or as a penalty for unacceptable conduct.

3. Violation. Conduct that violates subdivision 2 is not a crime under section 645.241, but may be a crime under chapter 609 if the conduct violates a provision of chapter 609.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Use of student and locker searches
Statute

LAWS

121A.72. School locker policy.

1. Policy. It is the policy of the state of Minnesota that:

"School lockers are the property of the school district. At no time does the school district relinquish its exclusive control of lockers provided for the convenience of students. Inspection of the interior of lockers may be conducted by school authorities for any reason at any time, without notice, without student consent, and without a search warrant. The personal possessions of students within a school locker may be searched only when school authorities have a reasonable suspicion that the search will uncover evidence of a violation of law or school rules. As soon as practicable after the search of a student's personal possessions, the school authorities must provide notice of the search to students whose lockers were searched unless disclosure would impede an ongoing investigation by police or school officials."

2. Dissemination. The locker policy must be disseminated to parents and students in the way that other policies of general application to students are disseminated. A copy of the policy must be provided to a student the first time that the student is given the use of a locker.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Other in-school disciplinary approaches
Statute

LAWS

121A.61. Discipline and removal of students from class.

1. Required policy. Each school board must adopt a written districtwide school discipline policy which includes written rules of conduct for students, minimum consequences for violations of the rules, and grounds and procedures for removal of a student from class. The policy must be developed in consultation with administrators, teachers, employees, pupils, parents, community members, law enforcement agencies, county attorney offices, social service agencies, and such other individuals or organizations as the board determines appropriate. A school site council may adopt additional provisions to the policy subject to the approval of the school board.

2. Grounds for removal from class. The policy must establish the various grounds for which a student may be removed from a class in the district for a period of time under the procedures specified in the policy. The policy must include a procedure for notifying and meeting with a student's parent or guardian to discuss the problem that is causing the student to be removed from class after the student has been removed from class more than ten times in one school year. The grounds in the policy must include at least the following provisions as well as other grounds determined appropriate by the board:

(a) willful conduct that significantly disrupts the rights of others to an education, including conduct that interferes with a teacher's ability to teach or communicate effectively with students in a class or with the ability of other students to learn;

(b) willful conduct that endangers surrounding persons, including school district employees, the student or other students, or the property of the school; and

(c) willful violation of any rule of conduct specified in the discipline policy adopted by the board.

3. Policy components. The policy must include at least the following components:

(a) rules governing student conduct and procedures for informing students of the rules;

(b) the grounds for removal of a student from a class;

(c) the authority of the classroom teacher to remove students from the classroom pursuant to procedures and rules established in the district's policy;

(d) the procedures for removal of a student from a class by a teacher, school administrator, or other school district employee;

(e) the period of time for which a student may be removed from a class, which may not exceed five class periods for a violation of a rule of conduct;

(f) provisions relating to the responsibility for and custody of a student removed from a class;

(g) the procedures for return of a student to the specified class from which the student has been removed;

(h) the procedures for notifying a student and the student's parents or guardian of violations of the rules of conduct and of resulting disciplinary actions;

(i) any procedures determined appropriate for encouraging early involvement of parents or guardians in attempts to improve a student's behavior;

(j) any procedures determined appropriate for encouraging early detection of behavioral problems;

(k) any procedures determined appropriate for referring a student in need of special education services to those services;

(l) the procedures for consideration of whether there is a need for a further assessment or of whether there is a need for a review of the adequacy of a current individualized education program of a student with a disability who is removed from class;

(m) procedures for detecting and addressing chemical abuse problems of a student while on the school premises;

(n) the minimum consequences for violations of the code of conduct;

(o) procedures for immediate and appropriate interventions tied to violations of the code;

(p) a provision that states that a teacher, school employee, school bus driver, or other agent of a district may use reasonable force in compliance with section 121A.582 and other laws;

(q) an agreement regarding procedures to coordinate crisis services to the extent funds are available with the county board responsible for implementing sections 245.487 to 245.4889 for students with a serious emotional disturbance or other students who have an individualized education program whose behavior may be addressed by crisis intervention; and

(r) a provision that states a student must be removed from class immediately if the student engages in assault or violent behavior. For purposes of this paragraph, "assault" has the meaning given it in section 609.02, subdivision 10. The removal shall be for a period of time deemed appropriate by the principal, in consultation with the teacher.

121A.70. Secret fraternities and societies.

2. Penalties. A school board may suspend or dismiss any pupil from school, or prevent the pupil from graduating or participating in school honors when, after investigation, in the judgment of the board or a majority of its membership, the pupil is guilty of violating any of the provisions of this section or is guilty of violating any rule or regulation adopted by the board for the purpose of governing its schools, or enforcing this section.

122A.627. Positive behavioral interventions and supports.

"Positive behavioral interventions and supports" or "PBIS" means an evidence-based framework for preventing problem behavior, providing instruction and support for positive and prosocial behaviors, and supporting social, emotional, and behavioral needs for all students. Schoolwide implementation of PBIS requires training, coaching, and evaluation for school staff to consistently implement the key components that make PBIS effective for all students, including:

(1) establishing, defining, teaching, and practicing three to five positively stated schoolwide behavioral expectations that are representative of the local community and cultures;

(2) developing and implementing a consistent system used by all staff to provide positive feedback and acknowledgment for students who display schoolwide behavioral expectations;

(3) developing and implementing a consistent and specialized support system for students who do not display behaviors representative of schoolwide positive expectations;

(4) developing a system to support decisions based on data related to student progress, effective implementation of behavioral practices, and screening for students requiring additional behavior supports;

(5) using a continuum of evidence-based interventions that is integrated and aligned to support academic and behavioral success for all students; and

(6) using a team-based approach to support effective implementation, monitor progress, and evaluate outcome

Consistent with section 120B.232, subdivision 1, character education curriculum and programs may be used to support implementation of the key components of PBIS.

REGULATIONS

3525.0850. Behavior interventions.

This policy is intended to encourage the use of positive approaches to behavioral interventions. The objective of any behavioral intervention must be that pupils acquire appropriate behaviors and skills. It is critical that behavioral intervention programs focus on skills acquisition rather than merely behavior reduction or elimination. Behavioral intervention policies, programs, or procedures must be designed to enable a pupil to benefit from an appropriate, individualized educational program as well as develop skills to enable them to function as independently as possible in their communities.

Major Category
Out-of-School and Exclusionary Discipline: Suspension,Expulsion, Restraint and Seclusion, and Alternative Placements
Sub Category
Grounds for possible suspension or expulsion
Statute

LAWS

121A.45. Grounds for dismissal.

1. Provision of alternative programs. No school shall dismiss any pupil without attempting to provide alternative educational services before dismissal proceedings, except where it appears that the pupil will create an immediate and substantial danger to self or to surrounding persons or property.

2. Grounds for dismissal. A pupil may be dismissed on any of the following grounds:

(a) willful violation of any reasonable school board regulation. Such regulation must be clear and definite to provide notice to pupils that they must conform their conduct to its requirements;

(b) willful conduct that significantly disrupts the rights of others to an education, or the ability of school personnel to perform their duties, or school sponsored extracurricular activities; or

(c) willful conduct that endangers the pupil or other pupils, or surrounding persons, including school district employees, or property of the school.

3. Parent notification and meeting. If a pupil's total days of removal from school exceeds ten cumulative days in a school year, the school district shall make reasonable attempts to convene a meeting with the pupil and the pupil's parent or guardian before subsequently removing the pupil from school and, with the permission of the parent or guardian, arrange for a mental health screening for the pupil. The district is not required to pay for the mental health screening. The purpose of this meeting is to attempt to determine the pupil's need for assessment or other services or whether the parent or guardian should have the pupil assessed or diagnosed to determine whether the pupil needs treatment for a mental health disorder.

121A.61. Discipline and removal of students from class.

1. Required policy. Each school board must adopt a written districtwide school discipline policy which includes written rules of conduct for students, minimum consequences for violations of the rules, and grounds and procedures for removal of a student from class. The policy must be developed in consultation with administrators, teachers, employees, pupils, parents, community members, law enforcement agencies, county attorney offices, social service agencies, and such other individuals or organizations as the board determines appropriate. A school site council may adopt additional provisions to the policy subject to the approval of the school board.

2. Grounds for removal from class. The policy must establish the various grounds for which a student may be removed from a class in the district for a period of time under the procedures specified in the policy. The policy must include a procedure for notifying and meeting with a student's parent or guardian to discuss the problem that is causing the student to be removed from class after the student has been removed from class more than ten times in one school year. The grounds in the policy must include at least the following provisions as well as other grounds determined appropriate by the board:

(a) willful conduct that significantly disrupts the rights of others to an education, including conduct that interferes with a teacher's ability to teach or communicate effectively with students in a class or with the ability of other students to learn;

(b) willful conduct that endangers surrounding persons, including school district employees, the student or other students, or the property of the school; and

(c) willful violation of any rule of conduct specified in the discipline policy adopted by the board.

121A.70. Secret fraternities and societies.

1. Membership regulated. It is unlawful for any pupil, registered and attending any public school to join, become a member of, or to solicit any other pupil of any public school to join, or become a member of, any secret fraternity or society wholly or partially formed from the membership of pupils attending any public schools or to take part in the organization or formation of any fraternity or society, except societies or associations sanctioned by the district school board.

2. Penalties. A school board may suspend or dismiss any pupil from school, or prevent the pupil from graduating or participating in school honors when, after investigation, in the judgment of the board or a majority of its membership, the pupil is guilty of violating any of the provisions of this section or is guilty of violating any rule or regulation adopted by the board for the purpose of governing its schools, or enforcing this section.

121A.69. Hazing policy.

1. Definitions.

(a) "Hazing" means committing an act against a student, or coercing a student into committing an act, that creates a substantial risk of harm to a person in order for the student to be initiated into or affiliated with a student organization.

(b) "Student organization" means a group, club, or organization having students as its primary members or participants.

2. Model policy. The commissioner of education shall maintain and make available to school boards a model policy on student or staff hazing that addresses the requirements of subdivision 3.

3. School board policy. Each school board shall adopt a written policy governing student or staff hazing. The policy must apply to student behavior that occurs on or off school property and during and after school hours and be consistent with section 121A.031. The policy must include reporting procedures and disciplinary consequences for violating the policy. Disciplinary consequences must be sufficiently severe to deter violations and appropriately discipline prohibited behavior. Disciplinary consequences must conform with sections 121A.031 and 121A.41. to 121A.56. Each school must include the policy in the student handbook on school policies.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Grounds for mandatory suspension or expulsion
Statute

LAWS

121A.44. Expulsion for possession of firearm.

(a) Notwithstanding the time limitation in section 121A.41, subdivision 5, a school board must expel for a period of at least one year a pupil who is determined to have brought a firearm to school except the board may modify this expulsion requirement for a pupil on a case-by-case basis. For the purposes of this section, firearm is as defined in United States Code, title 18, section 921.

(b) Notwithstanding chapter 13, a student's expulsion or withdrawal or transfer from a school after an expulsion action is initiated against the student for a weapons violation under paragraph (a) may be disclosed by the school district initiating the expulsion proceeding. Unless the information is otherwise public, the disclosure may be made only to another school district in connection with the possible admission of the student to the other district.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Limitations, conditions, or exclusions for use of suspension and expulsion
Statute

LAWS

121A.43. Exclusion and expulsion of pupils with a disability.

(a) Consistent with federal law governing days of removal and section 121A.46, school personnel may suspend a child with a disability. When a child with a disability has been suspended for more than five consecutive school days or ten cumulative school days in the same school year, and that suspension does not involve a recommendation for expulsion or exclusion or other change of placement under federal law, relevant members of the child's individualized education program team, including at least one of the child's teachers, shall meet and determine the extent to which the child needs services in order to continue to participate in the general education curriculum, although in another setting, and to progress toward meeting the goals in the child's individualized education program. That meeting must occur as soon as possible, but no more than ten days after the sixth consecutive day of suspension or the tenth cumulative day of suspension has elapsed.

(b) A dismissal for one school day or less is a day or a partial day of suspension if the child with a disability does not receive regular or special education instruction during that dismissal period. The notice requirements under section 121A.46 do not apply to a dismissal of one day or less.

(c) A child with a disability shall be provided alternative educational services to the extent a suspension exceeds five consecutive school days.

(d) Before initiating an expulsion or exclusion under sections 121A.40. to 121A.56, the district, relevant members of the child's individualized education program team, and the child's parent shall, consistent with federal law, determine whether the child's behavior was caused by or had a direct and substantial relationship to the child's disability and whether the child's conduct was a direct result of a failure to implement the child's individualized education program. When a child with a disability who has an individualized education program is excluded or expelled under sections 121A.40. to 121A.56 for misbehavior that is not a manifestation of the child's disability, the district shall continue to provide special education and related services during the exclusion or expulsion.

121A.44. Expulsion for possession of firearm.

(a) Notwithstanding the time limitation in section 121A.41, subdivision 5, a school board must expel for a period of at least one year a pupil who is determined to have brought a firearm to school except the board may modify this expulsion requirement for a pupil on a case-by-case basis. For the purposes of this section, firearm is as defined in United States Code, title 18, section 921.

121A.61. Discipline and removal of students from class.

3. Policy components. The policy must include at least the following components:

(e) the period of time for which a student may be removed from a class, which may not exceed five class periods for a violation of a rule of conduct;

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Administrative procedures related to suspension and expulsion
Statute

LAWS

121A.40. Citation.

Sections 121A.40 to 121A.56 may be cited as the "Pupil Fair Dismissal Act."

121A.42. Policy.

No public school shall deny due process or equal protection of the law to any public school pupil involved in a dismissal proceeding which may result in suspension, exclusion, or expulsion.

121A.46. Suspension procedures.

1. Informal administrative conference before suspension. The school administration shall not suspend a pupil from school without an informal administrative conference with the pupil. The informal administrative conference shall take place before the suspension, except where it appears that the pupil will create an immediate and substantial danger to self or to surrounding persons or property, in which case the conference shall take place as soon as practicable following the suspension.

2. Administrator notifies pupil of grounds for suspension. At the informal administrative conference, a school administrator shall notify the pupil of the grounds for the suspension, provide an explanation of the evidence the authorities have, and the pupil may present the pupil's version of the facts.

3. Written notice of grounds for suspension. A written notice containing the grounds for suspension, a brief statement of the facts, a description of the testimony, a readmission plan, and a copy of sections 121A.40. to 121A.56, shall be personally served upon the pupil at or before the time the suspension is to take effect, and upon the pupil's parent or guardian by mail within 48 hours of the conference. The district shall make reasonable efforts to notify the parents of the suspension by telephone as soon as possible following suspension. In the event a pupil is suspended without an informal administrative conference on the grounds that the pupil will create an immediate and substantial danger to surrounding persons or property, the written notice shall be served upon the pupil and the pupil's parent or guardian within 48 hours of the suspension. Service by mail is complete upon mailing.

4. Suspension pending expulsion or exclusion hearing. Notwithstanding the provisions of subdivisions 1 and 3, the pupil may be suspended pending the school board's decision in the expulsion or exclusion hearing; provided that alternative educational services are implemented to the extent that suspension exceeds five days.

121A.47. Exclusion and expulsion procedures.

1. Requiring a hearing; pupil may waive hearing. No exclusion or expulsion shall be imposed without a hearing, unless the right to a hearing is waived in writing by the pupil and parent or guardian. The action shall be initiated by the school board or its agent.

2. Written notice. Written notice of intent to take action shall:

(a) be served upon the pupil and the pupil's parent or guardian personally or by mail;

(b) contain a complete statement of the facts, a list of the witnesses and a description of their testimony;

(c) state the date, time, and place of the hearing;

(d) be accompanied by a copy of sections 121A.40. to 121A.56;

(e) describe alternative educational services accorded the pupil in an attempt to avoid the expulsion proceedings; and

(f) inform the pupil and parent or guardian of the right to:

(1) have a representative of the pupil's own choosing, including legal counsel, at the hearing. The district shall advise the pupil's parent or guardian that free or low-cost legal assistance may be available and that a legal assistance resource list is available from the Department of Education;

(2) examine the pupil's records before the hearing;

(3) present evidence; and

(4) confront and cross-examine witnesses.

3. Hearing schedule. The hearing shall be scheduled within ten days of the service of the written notice unless an extension, not to exceed five days, is requested for good cause by the school board, pupil, parent or guardian.

4. Convenient time and place of hearing. The hearing shall be at a time and place reasonably convenient to pupil, parent or guardian.

5. Closed or open hearing. The hearing shall be closed unless the pupil, parent or guardian requests an open hearing.

6. Impartial hearer. The hearing shall take place before:

(1) an independent hearing officer;

(2) a member of the school board;

(3) a committee of the school board; or

(4) the full school board;

as determined by the school board. The hearing shall be conducted in a fair and impartial manner.

7. Creating hearing record. The school board shall record the hearing proceedings at district expense, and a party may obtain a transcript at its own expense. Testimony shall be given under oath. The hearing officer or a member of the school board shall have the power to issue subpoenas and administer oaths.

8. Access to pupil's records. At a reasonable time prior to the hearing, the pupil, parent or guardian, or representative, shall be given access to all public school system records pertaining to the pupil, including any tests or reports upon which the proposed action may be based.

9. Pupil's right to compel testimony. The pupil, parent or guardian, or representative, shall have the right to compel the attendance of any official employee or agent of the public school system or any public employee or any other person who may have evidence upon which the proposed action may be based, and to confront and to cross-examine any witness testifying for the public school system.

10. Pupil's right to present evidence and testimony. The pupil, parent or guardian, or representative, shall have the right to present evidence and testimony, including expert psychological or educational testimony.

11. Pupil not compelled to testify. The pupil cannot be compelled to testify in the dismissal proceedings.

12. Hearer's recommendation limited to evidence at hearing; service within two days. The recommendation of the hearing officer or school board member or committee shall be based solely upon substantial evidence presented at the hearing and must be made to the school board and served upon the parties within two days of the end of the hearing.

13. Basis of school board decision; opportunity for comment. The school board shall base its decision upon the recommendation of the hearing officer or school board member or committee and shall render its decision at a meeting held within five days after receiving the recommendation. The school board may provide the parties with the opportunity to present exceptions and comments to the hearing officer's recommendations provided that neither party presents any evidence not admitted at the hearing. The decision by the school board must be based on the record, must be in writing, and must state the controlling facts on which the decision is made in sufficient detail to apprise the parties and the commissioner of education of the basis and reason for the decision.

14. Admission or readmission plan.

(a) A school administrator shall prepare and enforce an admission or readmission plan for any pupil who is excluded or expelled from school. The plan may include measures to improve the pupil's behavior, including completing a character education program, consistent with section 120B.232, subdivision 1, and require parental involvement in the admission or readmission process, and may indicate the consequences to the pupil of not improving the pupil's behavior.

(b) The definition of suspension under section 121A.41, subdivision 10, does not apply to a student's dismissal from school for one school day or less, except as provided under federal law for a student with a disability. Each suspension action may include a readmission plan. A readmission plan must provide, where appropriate, alternative education services, which must not be used to extend the student's current suspension period. Consistent with section 125A.091, subdivision 5, a readmission plan must not obligate a parent or guardian to provide psychotropic drugs to their student as a condition of readmission. School officials must not use the refusal of a parent or guardian to consent to the administration of psychotropic drugs to their student or to consent to a psychiatric evaluation, screening or examination of the student as a ground, by itself, to prohibit the student from attending class or participating in a school-related activity, or as a basis of a charge of child abuse, child neglect or medical or educational neglect.

121A.48. Good faith exception.

A violation of the technical provisions of the Pupil Fair Dismissal Act, made in good faith, is not a defense to a disciplinary procedure under the act unless the pupil can demonstrate actual prejudice as a result of the violation.

121A.49. Appeal.

A party to an exclusion or expulsion decision made under sections 121A.40. to 121A.56 may appeal the decision to the commissioner of education within 21 calendar days of school board action. Upon being served with a notice of appeal, the district shall provide the commissioner and the parent or guardian with a complete copy of the hearing record within five days of its receipt of the notice of appeal. All written submissions by the appellant must be submitted and served on the respondent within ten days of its actual receipt of the transcript. All written submissions by the respondent must be submitted and served on the appellant within ten days of its actual receipt of the written submissions of the appellant. The decision of the school board must be implemented during the appeal to the commissioner.

In an appeal under this section, the commissioner may affirm the decision of the agency, may remand the decision for additional findings, or may reverse or modify the decision if the substantial rights of the petitioners have been prejudiced because the administrative findings, inferences, conclusions, or decisions are:

(1) in violation of constitutional provisions;

(2) in excess of the statutory authority or jurisdiction of the school district;

(3) made upon unlawful procedure, except as provided in section 121A.48;

(4) affected by other error of law;

(5) unsupported by substantial evidence in view of the entire record submitted; or

(6) arbitrary or capricious.

The commissioner or the commissioner's representative shall make a final decision based upon the record. The commissioner shall issue a decision within 30 calendar days of receiving the entire record and the parties' written submission on appeal. The commissioner's decision shall be final and binding upon the parties after the time for appeal expires under section 121A.50.

121A.50. Judicial review.

The decision of the commissioner of education made under sections 121A.40. to 121A.56 is subject to judicial review under sections 14.63 to 14.69. The decision of the commissioner is stayed pending an appeal under this section.

121A.52. Nonapplication of compulsory attendance law.

The provisions of section 120A.22, subdivision 5, shall not apply to any pupil during a dismissal pursuant to sections 121A.40 to 121A.56.

121A.53. Report to commissioner of education.

1. Exclusions and expulsions; physical assaults. The school board must report through the department electronic reporting system each exclusion or expulsion and each physical assault of a district employee by a student within 30 days of the effective date of the dismissal action or assault to the commissioner of education. This report must include a statement of alternative educational services, or other sanction, intervention, or resolution in response to the assault given the pupil and the reason for, the effective date, and the duration of the exclusion or expulsion or other sanction, intervention, or resolution. The report must also include the student's age, grade, gender, race, and special education status.

2. Report.

(a) The school board must include state student identification numbers of affected pupils on all dismissal and other disciplinary reports required by the department. The department must report annually to the commissioner summary data on the number of dismissals and physical assaults of district employees by a student by age, grade, gender, race, and special education status of the affected pupils. All dismissal and other disciplinary reports must be submitted through the department electronic reporting system.

(b) The commissioner must aggregate the district data reported under this section and include the aggregated data, including aggregated data on physical assaults of a district employee by a student, in the annual school performance reports under section 120B.36.

121A.55. Policies to be established.

(a) The commissioner of education shall promulgate guidelines to assist each school board to establish uniform criteria for dismissal and adopt written policies and rules to effectuate sections 121A.031 and 121A.40. to 121A.56. The policies shall emphasize preventing dismissals through early detection of problems and be designed to prevent students' inappropriate behavior from recurring. The policies shall recognize the continuing responsibility of the school to educate the pupil during the dismissal period. The alternative educational services, if the pupil wishes to take advantage of them, must be adequate to allow the pupil to make progress towards meeting the graduation standards adopted under section 120B.02 and help prepare the pupil for readmission.

(b) An area learning center under section 123A.05 may not prohibit an expelled or excluded pupil from enrolling solely because a district expelled or excluded the pupil. The board of the area learning center may use the provisions of the Pupil Fair Dismissal Act to exclude a pupil or to require an admission plan.

(c) Each school district shall develop a policy and report it to the commissioner on the appropriate use of peace officers and crisis teams to remove students who have an individualized education program from school grounds.

121A.61. Discipline and removal of students from class.

1. Required policy. Each school board must adopt a written districtwide school discipline policy which includes written rules of conduct for students, minimum consequences for violations of the rules, and grounds and procedures for removal of a student from class. The policy must be developed in consultation with administrators, teachers, employees, pupils, parents, community members, law enforcement agencies, county attorney offices, social service agencies, and such other individuals or organizations as the board determines appropriate. A school site council may adopt additional provisions to the policy subject to the approval of the school board.

2. Grounds for removal from class. The policy must establish the various grounds for which a student may be removed from a class in the district for a period of time under the procedures specified in the policy. The policy must include a procedure for notifying and meeting with a student's parent or guardian to discuss the problem that is causing the student to be removed from class after the student has been removed from class more than ten times in one school year. The grounds in the policy must include at least the following provisions as well as other grounds determined appropriate by the board:

(a) willful conduct that significantly disrupts the rights of others to an education, including conduct that interferes with a teacher's ability to teach or communicate effectively with students in a class or with the ability of other students to learn;

(b) willful conduct that endangers surrounding persons, including school district employees, the student or other students, or the property of the school; and

(c) willful violation of any rule of conduct specified in the discipline policy adopted by the board.

3. Policy components. The policy must include at least the following components:

(a) rules governing student conduct and procedures for informing students of the rules;

(b) the grounds for removal of a student from a class;

(c) the authority of the classroom teacher to remove students from the classroom pursuant to procedures and rules established in the district's policy;

(d) the procedures for removal of a student from a class by a teacher, school administrator, or other school district employee;

(e) the period of time for which a student may be removed from a class, which may not exceed five class periods for a violation of a rule of conduct;

(f) provisions relating to the responsibility for and custody of a student removed from a class;

(g) the procedures for return of a student to the specified class from which the student has been removed;

(h) the procedures for notifying a student and the student's parents or guardian of violations of the rules of conduct and of resulting disciplinary actions;

(i) any procedures determined appropriate for encouraging early involvement of parents or guardians in attempts to improve a student's behavior;

(j) any procedures determined appropriate for encouraging early detection of behavioral problems;

(k) any procedures determined appropriate for referring a student in need of special education services to those services;

(l) the procedures for consideration of whether there is a need for a further assessment or of whether there is a need for a review of the adequacy of a current individualized education program of a student with a disability who is removed from class;

(m) procedures for detecting and addressing chemical abuse problems of a student while on the school premises;

(n) the minimum consequences for violations of the code of conduct;

(o) procedures for immediate and appropriate interventions tied to violations of the code;

(p) a provision that states that a teacher, school employee, school bus driver, or other agent of a district may use reasonable force in compliance with section 121A.582 and other laws;

(q) an agreement regarding procedures to coordinate crisis services to the extent funds are available with the county board responsible for implementing sections 245.487 to 245.4889 for students with a serious emotional disturbance or other students who have an individualized education program whose behavior may be addressed by crisis intervention; and

(r) a provision that states a student must be removed from class immediately if the student engages in assault or violent behavior. For purposes of this paragraph, "assault" has the meaning given it in section 609.02, subdivision 10. The removal shall be for a period of time deemed appropriate by the principal, in consultation with the teacher.

121A.67. Removal by peace officer.

2. Removal by peace officer. If a pupil who has an individualized education program is restrained or removed from a classroom, school building, or school grounds by a peace officer at the request of a school administrator or a school staff person during the school day twice in a 30-day period, the pupil's individualized education program team must meet to determine if the pupil's individualized education program is adequate or if additional evaluation is needed.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
In-school suspension
Statute

No relevant laws or regulations found.

Sub Category
Return to school following removal
Statute

LAWS

121A.41. Definitions.

10. "Suspension" means an action by the school administration, under rules promulgated by the school board, prohibiting a pupil from attending school for a period of no more than ten school days. If a suspension is longer than five days, the suspending administrator must provide the superintendent with a reason for the longer suspension. This definition does not apply to dismissal from school for one school day or less, except as provided in federal law for a student with a disability. Each suspension action may include a readmission plan. The readmission plan shall include, where appropriate, a provision for implementing alternative educational services upon readmission and may not be used to extend the current suspension. Consistent with section 125A.091, subdivision 5, the readmission plan must not obligate a parent to provide a sympathomimetic medication for the parent's child as a condition of readmission. The school administration may not impose consecutive suspensions against the same pupil for the same course of conduct, or incident of misconduct, except where the pupil will create an immediate and substantial danger to self or to surrounding persons or property, or where the district is in the process of initiating an expulsion, in which case the school administration may extend the suspension to a total of 15 school days.

121A.47. Exclusion and expulsion procedures.

14. Admission or readmission plan.

(a) A school administrator shall prepare and enforce an admission or readmission plan for any pupil who is excluded or expelled from school. The plan may include measures to improve the pupil's behavior, including completing a character education program, consistent with section 120B.232, subdivision 1, and require parental involvement in the admission or readmission process, and may indicate the consequences to the pupil of not improving the pupil's behavior.

(b) The definition of suspension under section 121A.41, subdivision 10, does not apply to a student's dismissal from school for one school day or less, except as provided under federal law for a student with a disability. Each suspension action may include a readmission plan. A readmission plan must provide, where appropriate, alternative education services, which must not be used to extend the student's current suspension period. Consistent with section 125A.091, subdivision 5, a readmission plan must not obligate a parent or guardian to provide psychotropic drugs to their student as a condition of readmission. School officials must not use the refusal of a parent or guardian to consent to the administration of psychotropic drugs to their student or to consent to a psychiatric evaluation, screening or examination of the student as a ground, by itself, to prohibit the student from attending class or participating in a school-related activity, or as a basis of a charge of child abuse, child neglect or medical or educational neglect.

121A.54. Notice of right to be reinstated.

Whenever a pupil fails to return to school within ten school days of the termination of dismissal, a school administrator shall inform the pupil and the pupil's parents by mail of the pupil's right to attend and to be reinstated in the public school.

121A.61. Discipline and removal of students from class.

3. Policy components. The policy must include at least the following components:

(g) the procedures for return of a student to the specified class from which the student has been removed;

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Use of restraint and seclusion
Statute

LAWS

121A.67. Removal by peace officer.

2. Removal by peace officer. If a pupil who has an individualized education program is restrained or removed from a classroom, school building, or school grounds by a peace officer at the request of a school administrator or a school staff person during the school day twice in a 30-day period, the pupil's individualized education program team must meet to determine if the pupil's individualized education program is adequate or if additional evaluation is needed.

125A.0941. Definitions.

(a) The following terms have the meanings given them.

(b) "Emergency" means a situation where immediate intervention is needed to protect a child or other individual from physical injury. Emergency does not mean circumstances such as: a child who does not respond to a task or request and instead places his or her head on a desk or hides under a desk or table; a child who does not respond to a staff person's request unless failing to respond would result in physical injury to the child or other individual; or an emergency incident has already occurred and no threat of physical injury currently exists.

(c) "Physical holding" means physical intervention intended to hold a child immobile or limit a child's movement, where body contact is the only source of physical restraint, and where immobilization is used to effectively gain control of a child in order to protect a child or other individual from physical injury. The term physical holding does not mean physical contact that:

(1) helps a child respond or complete a task;

(2) assists a child without restricting the child's movement;

(3) is needed to administer an authorized health-related service or procedure; or

(4) is needed to physically escort a child when the child does not resist or the child's resistance is minimal.

(d) "Positive behavioral interventions and supports" means interventions and strategies to improve the school environment and teach children the skills to behave appropriately, including the key components under section 122A.627.

(e) "Prone restraint" means placing a child in a face down position.

(f) "Restrictive procedures" means the use of physical holding or seclusion in an emergency. Restrictive procedures must not be used to punish or otherwise discipline a child.

(g) "Seclusion" means confining a child alone in a room from which egress is barred. Egress may be barred by an adult locking or closing the door in the room or preventing the child from leaving the room. Removing a child from an activity to a location where the child cannot participate in or observe the activity is not seclusion.

125A.0942. Standards for restrictive procedures.

1. Restrictive procedures plan.

(a) Schools that intend to use restrictive procedures shall maintain and make publicly accessible in an electronic format on a school or district Web site or make a paper copy available upon request describing a restrictive procedures plan for children with disabilities that at least:

(1) lists the restrictive procedures the school intends to use;

(2) describes how the school will implement a range of positive behavior strategies and provide links to mental health services;

(3) describes how the school will provide training on de-escalation techniques, consistent with section 122A.09, subdivision 4, paragraph (k);

(4) describes how the school will monitor and review the use of restrictive procedures, including:

(i) conducting post-use debriefings, consistent with subdivision 3, paragraph (a), clause (5); and

(ii) convening an oversight committee to undertake a quarterly review of the use of restrictive procedures based on patterns or problems indicated by similarities in the time of day, day of the week, duration of the use of a procedure, the individuals involved, or other factors associated with the use of restrictive procedures; the number of times a restrictive procedure is used schoolwide and for individual children; the number and types of injuries, if any, resulting from the use of restrictive procedures; whether restrictive procedures are used in nonemergency situations; the need for additional staff training; and proposed actions to minimize the use of restrictive procedures; and

(5) includes a written description and documentation of the training staff completed under subdivision 5.

(b) Schools annually must publicly identify oversight committee members who must at least include:

(1) a mental health professional, school psychologist, or school social worker;

(2) an expert in positive behavior strategies;

(3) a special education administrator; and

(4) a general education administrator.

2. Restrictive procedures.

(a) Restrictive procedures may be used only by a licensed special education teacher, school social worker, school psychologist, behavior analyst certified by the National Behavior Analyst Certification Board, a person with a master's degree in behavior analysis, other licensed education professional, paraprofessional under section 120B.363, or mental health professional under section 245.4871, subdivision 27, who has completed the training program under subdivision 5.

(b) A school shall make reasonable efforts to notify the parent on the same day a restrictive procedure is used on the child, or if the school is unable to provide same-day notice, notice is sent within two days by written or electronic means or as otherwise indicated by the child's parent under paragraph (f).

(c) The district must hold a meeting of the individualized education program team, conduct or review a functional behavioral analysis, review data, consider developing additional or revised positive behavioral interventions and supports, consider actions to reduce the use of restrictive procedures, and modify the individualized education program or behavior intervention plan as appropriate. The district must hold the meeting: within ten calendar days after district staff use restrictive procedures on two separate school days within 30 calendar days or a pattern of use emerges and the child's individualized education program or behavior intervention plan does not provide for using restrictive procedures in an emergency; or at the request of a parent or the district after restrictive procedures are used. The district must review use of restrictive procedures at a child's annual individualized education program meeting when the child's individualized education program provides for using restrictive procedures in an emergency.

(d) If the individualized education program team under paragraph (c) determines that existing interventions and supports are ineffective in reducing the use of restrictive procedures or the district uses restrictive procedures on a child on ten or more school days during the same school year, the team, as appropriate, either must consult with other professionals working with the child; consult with experts in behavior analysis, mental health, communication, or autism; consult with culturally competent professionals; review existing evaluations, resources, and successful strategies; or consider whether to reevaluate the child.

(e) At the individualized education program meeting under paragraph (c), the team must review any known medical or psychological limitations, including any medical information the parent provides voluntarily, that contraindicate the use of a restrictive procedure, consider whether to prohibit that restrictive procedure, and document any prohibition in the individualized education program or behavior intervention plan.

(f) An individualized education program team may plan for using restrictive procedures and may include these procedures in a child's individualized education program or behavior intervention plan; however, the restrictive procedures may be used only in response to behavior that constitutes an emergency, consistent with this section. The individualized education program or behavior intervention plan shall indicate how the parent wants to be notified when a restrictive procedure is used.

3. Physical holding or seclusion.

(a) Physical holding or seclusion may be used only in an emergency. A school that uses physical holding or seclusion shall meet the following requirements:

(1) physical holding or seclusion is the least intrusive intervention that effectively responds to the emergency;

(2) physical holding or seclusion is not used to discipline a noncompliant child;

(3) physical holding or seclusion ends when the threat of harm ends and the staff determines the child can safely return to the classroom or activity;

(4) staff directly observes the child while physical holding or seclusion is being used;

(5) each time physical holding or seclusion is used, the staff person who implements or oversees the physical holding or seclusion documents, as soon as possible after the incident concludes, the following information:

(i) a description of the incident that led to the physical holding or seclusion;

(ii) why a less restrictive measure failed or was determined by staff to be inappropriate or impractical;

(iii) the time the physical holding or seclusion began and the time the child was released; and

(iv) a brief record of the child's behavioral and physical status;

(6) the room used for seclusion must:

(i) be at least six feet by five feet;

(ii) be well lit, well ventilated, adequately heated, and clean;

(iii) have a window that allows staff to directly observe a child in seclusion;

(iv) have tamperproof fixtures, electrical switches located immediately outside the door, and secure ceilings;

(v) have doors that open out and are unlocked, locked with keyless locks that have immediate release mechanisms, or locked with locks that have immediate release mechanisms connected with a fire and emergency system; and

(vi) not contain objects that a child may use to injure the child or others; and

(7) before using a room for seclusion, a school must:

(i) receive written notice from local authorities that the room and the locking mechanisms comply with applicable building, fire, and safety codes; and

(ii) register the room with the commissioner, who may view that room.

(b) By February 1, 2015, and annually thereafter, stakeholders may, as necessary, recommend to the commissioner specific and measurable implementation and outcome goals for reducing the use of restrictive procedures and the commissioner must submit to the legislature a report on districts' progress in reducing the use of restrictive procedures that recommends how to further reduce these procedures and eliminate the use of seclusion. The statewide plan includes the following components: measurable goals; the resources, training, technical assistance, mental health services, and collaborative efforts needed to significantly reduce districts' use of seclusion; and recommendations to clarify and improve the law governing districts' use of restrictive procedures. The commissioner must consult with interested stakeholders when preparing the report, including representatives of advocacy organizations, special education directors, teachers, paraprofessionals, intermediate school districts, school boards, day treatment providers, county social services, state human services department staff, mental health professionals, and autism experts. Beginning with the 2016-2017 school year, in a form and manner determined by the commissioner, districts must report data quarterly to the department by January 15, April 15, July 15, and October 15 about individual students who have been secluded. By July 15 each year, districts must report summary data on their use of restrictive procedures to the department for the prior school year, July 1 through June 30, in a form and manner determined by the commissioner. The summary data must include information about the use of restrictive procedures, including use of reasonable force under section 121A.582.

4. Prohibitions. The following actions or procedures are prohibited:

(1) engaging in conduct prohibited under section 121A.58;

(2) requiring a child to assume and maintain a specified physical position, activity, or posture that induces physical pain;

(3) totally or partially restricting a child's senses as punishment;

(4) presenting an intense sound, light, or other sensory stimuli using smell, taste, substance, or spray as punishment;

(5) denying or restricting a child's access to equipment and devices such as walkers, wheelchairs, hearing aids, and communication boards that facilitate the child's functioning, except when temporarily removing the equipment or device is needed to prevent injury to the child or others or serious damage to the equipment or device, in which case the equipment or device shall be returned to the child as soon as possible;

(6) interacting with a child in a manner that constitutes sexual abuse, neglect, or physical abuse under section 626.556;

(7) withholding regularly scheduled meals or water;

(8) denying access to bathroom facilities;

(9) physical holding that restricts or impairs a child's ability to breathe, restricts or impairs a child's ability to communicate distress, places pressure or weight on a child's head, throat, neck, chest, lungs, sternum, diaphragm, back, or abdomen, or results in straddling a child's torso; and

(10) prone restraint.

5. Training for staff.

(a) To meet the requirements of subdivision 1, staff who use restrictive procedures, including paraprofessionals, shall complete training in the following skills and knowledge areas:

(1) positive behavioral interventions;

(2) communicative intent of behaviors;

(3) relationship building;

(4) alternatives to restrictive procedures, including techniques to identify events and environmental factors that may escalate behavior;

(5) de-escalation methods;

(6) standards for using restrictive procedures only in an emergency;

(7) obtaining emergency medical assistance;

(8) the physiological and psychological impact of physical holding and seclusion;

(9) monitoring and responding to a child's physical signs of distress when physical holding is being used;

(10) recognizing the symptoms of and interventions that may cause positional asphyxia when physical holding is used;

(11) district policies and procedures for timely reporting and documenting each incident involving use of a restricted procedure; and

(12) schoolwide programs on positive behavior strategies.

(b) The commissioner, after consulting with the commissioner of human services, must develop and maintain a list of training programs that satisfy the requirements of paragraph (a). The commissioner also must develop and maintain a list of experts to help individualized education program teams reduce the use of restrictive procedures. The district shall maintain records of staff who have been trained and the organization or professional that conducted the training. The district may collaborate with children's community mental health providers to coordinate trainings.

6. Behavior supports; reasonable force.

(a) School districts are encouraged to establish effective schoolwide systems of positive behavior interventions and supports.

(b) Nothing in this section or section 125A.0941 precludes the use of reasonable force under sections 121A.582; 609.06, subdivision 1; and 609.379. For the 2014-2015 school year and later, districts must collect and submit to the commissioner summary data, consistent with subdivision 3, paragraph (b), on district use of reasonable force that is consistent with the definition of physical holding or seclusion for a child with a disability under this section.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Alternative placements
Statute

LAWS

121A.41. Definitions.

11. Alternative educational services. "Alternative educational services" may include, but are not limited to, special tutoring, modified curriculum, modified instruction, other modifications or adaptations, instruction through electronic media, special education services as indicated by appropriate assessment, homebound instruction, supervised homework, or enrollment in another district or in an alternative learning center under section 123A.05 selected to allow the pupil to progress toward meeting graduation standards under section 120B.02, although in a different setting.

121A.43. Exclusion and expulsion of pupils with a disability.

(a) Consistent with federal law governing days of removal and section 121A.46, school personnel may suspend a child with a disability. When a child with a disability has been suspended for more than five consecutive school days or ten cumulative school days in the same school year, and that suspension does not involve a recommendation for expulsion or exclusion or other change of placement under federal law, relevant members of the child's individualized education program team, including at least one of the child's teachers, shall meet and determine the extent to which the child needs services in order to continue to participate in the general education curriculum, although in another setting, and to progress toward meeting the goals in the child's individualized education program. That meeting must occur as soon as possible, but no more than ten days after the sixth consecutive day of suspension or the tenth cumulative day of suspension has elapsed.

(b) A dismissal for one school day or less is a day or a partial day of suspension if the child with a disability does not receive regular or special education instruction during that dismissal period. The notice requirements under section 121A.46 do not apply to a dismissal of one day or less.

(c) A child with a disability shall be provided alternative educational services to the extent a suspension exceeds five consecutive school days.

(d) Before initiating an expulsion or exclusion under sections 121A.40. to 121A.56, the district, relevant members of the child's individualized education program team, and the child's parent shall, consistent with federal law, determine whether the child's behavior was caused by or had a direct and substantial relationship to the child's disability and whether the child's conduct was a direct result of a failure to implement the child's individualized education program. When a child with a disability who has an individualized education program is excluded or expelled under sections 121A.40. to 121A.56 for misbehavior that is not a manifestation of the child's disability, the district shall continue to provide special education and related services during the exclusion or expulsion.

121A.45. Grounds for dismissal.

1. Provision of alternative programs. No school shall dismiss any pupil without attempting to provide alternative educational services before dismissal proceedings, except where it appears that the pupil will create an immediate and substantial danger to self or to surrounding persons or property.

121A.53. Report to commissioner of education.

1. Exclusions and expulsions; physical assaults. The school board must report through the department electronic reporting system each exclusion or expulsion and each physical assault of a district employee by a student within 30 days of the effective date of the dismissal action or assault to the commissioner of education. This report must include a statement of alternative educational services, or other sanction, intervention, or resolution in response to the assault given the pupil and the reason for, the effective date, and the duration of the exclusion or expulsion or other sanction, intervention, or resolution. The report must also include the student's age, grade, gender, race, and special education status.

2. Report.

(a) The school board must include state student identification numbers of affected pupils on all dismissal and other disciplinary reports required by the department. The department must report annually to the commissioner summary data on the number of dismissals and physical assaults of district employees by a student by age, grade, gender, race, and special education status of the affected pupils. All dismissal and other disciplinary reports must be submitted through the department electronic reporting system.

(b) The commissioner must aggregate the district data reported under this section and include the aggregated data, including aggregated data on physical assaults of a district employee by a student, in the annual school performance reports under section 120B.36.

121A.55. Policies to be established.

(a) The commissioner of education shall promulgate guidelines to assist each school board to establish uniform criteria for dismissal and adopt written policies and rules to effectuate sections 121A.031 and 121A.40. to 121A.56. The policies shall emphasize preventing dismissals through early detection of problems and be designed to prevent students' inappropriate behavior from recurring. The policies shall recognize the continuing responsibility of the school to educate the pupil during the dismissal period. The alternative educational services, if the pupil wishes to take advantage of them, must be adequate to allow the pupil to make progress towards meeting the graduation standards adopted under section 120B.02 and help prepare the pupil for readmission.

(b) An area learning center under section 123A.05 may not prohibit an expelled or excluded pupil from enrolling solely because a district expelled or excluded the pupil. The board of the area learning center may use the provisions of the Pupil Fair Dismissal Act to exclude a pupil or to require an admission plan.

(c) Each school district shall develop a policy and report it to the commissioner on the appropriate use of peace officers and crisis teams to remove students who have an individualized education program from school grounds.

121A.61. Discipline and removal of students from class.

3. Policy components. The policy must include at least the following components:

(l) the procedures for consideration of whether there is a need for a further assessment or of whether there is a need for a review of the adequacy of a current individualized education program of a student with a disability who is removed from class;

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Major Category
Disciplinary Approaches Addressing Specific Infractions and Conditions
Sub Category
Firearms (as required by the Guns-Free Schools Act)
Statute

LAWS

121A.05. Policy to refer firearms possessor.

A school board must have a policy requiring the appropriate school official to, as soon as practicable, refer to the criminal justice or juvenile delinquency system, as appropriate, a pupil who brings a firearm to school unlawfully.

121A.44. Expulsion for possession of firearm.

(a) Notwithstanding the time limitation in section 121A.41, subdivision 5, a school board must expel for a period of at least one year a pupil who is determined to have brought a firearm to school except the board may modify this expulsion requirement for a pupil on a case-by-case basis. For the purposes of this section, firearm is as defined in United States Code, title 18, section 921.

(b) Notwithstanding chapter 13, a student's expulsion or withdrawal or transfer from a school after an expulsion action is initiated against the student for a weapons violation under paragraph (a) may be disclosed by the school district initiating the expulsion proceeding. Unless the information is otherwise public, the disclosure may be made only to another school district in connection with the possible admission of the student to the other district

609.66. Dangerous weapons.

1d. Possession on school property; penalty.

(a) Except as provided under paragraphs (d) and (f), whoever possesses, stores, or keeps a dangerous weapon while knowingly on school property is guilty of a felony and may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than five years or to payment of a fine of not more than $10,000, or both.

(b) Whoever uses or brandishes a replica firearm or a BB gun while knowingly on school property is guilty of a gross misdemeanor.

(c) Whoever possesses, stores, or keeps a replica firearm or a BB gun while knowingly on school property is guilty of a misdemeanor.

(d) Notwithstanding paragraph (a), (b), or (c), it is a misdemeanor for a person authorized to carry a firearm under the provisions of a permit or otherwise to carry a firearm on or about the person's clothes or person in a location the person knows is school property. Notwithstanding section 609.531, a firearm carried in violation of this paragraph is not subject to forfeiture.

(e) As used in this subdivision:

(1) "BB gun" means a device that fires or ejects a shot measuring .18 of an inch or less in diameter;

(2) "dangerous weapon" has the meaning given it in section 609.02, subdivision 6;

(3) "replica firearm" has the meaning given it in section 609.713; and

(4) "school property" means:

(i) a public or private elementary, middle, or secondary school building and its improved grounds, whether leased or owned by the school;

(ii) a child care center licensed under chapter 245A during the period children are present and participating in a child care program;

(iii) the area within a school bus when that bus is being used by a school to transport one or more elementary, middle, or secondary school students to and from school-related activities, including curricular, cocurricular, noncurricular, extracurricular, and supplementary activities; and

(iv) that portion of a building or facility under the temporary, exclusive control of a public or private school, a school district, or an association of such entities where conspicuous signs are prominently posted at each entrance that give actual notice to persons of the school-related use.

(f) This subdivision does not apply to:

(1) active licensed peace officers;

(2) military personnel or students participating in military training, who are on-duty, performing official duties;

(3) persons authorized to carry a pistol under section 624.714 while in a motor vehicle or outside of a motor vehicle to directly place a firearm in, or retrieve it from, the trunk or rear area of the vehicle;

(4) persons who keep or store in a motor vehicle pistols in accordance with section 624.714 or 624.715 or other firearms in accordance with section 97B.045;

(5) firearm safety or marksmanship courses or activities conducted on school property;

(6) possession of dangerous weapons, BB guns, or replica firearms by a ceremonial color guard;

(7) a gun or knife show held on school property;

(8) possession of dangerous weapons, BB guns, or replica firearms with written permission of the principal or other person having general control and supervision of the school or the director of a child care center; or

(9) persons who are on unimproved property owned or leased by a child care center, school, or school district unless the person knows that a student is currently present on the land for a school-related activity.

(g) Notwithstanding section 471.634, a school district or other entity composed exclusively of school districts may not regulate firearms, ammunition, or their respective components, when possessed or carried by nonstudents or nonemployees, in a manner that is inconsistent with this subdivision.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Other weapons
Statute

LAWS

121A.06. Reports of dangerous weapon incidents in school zones.

1. Definitions. As used in this section:

(1) "dangerous weapon" has the meaning given it in section 609.02, subdivision 6;

(2) "school" has the meaning given it in section 120A.22, subdivision 4; and

(3) "school zone" has the meaning given it in section 152.01, subdivision 14a, clauses (1) and (3).

2. Reports; content. School districts must electronically report to the commissioner of education incidents involving the use or possession of a dangerous weapon in school zones. The form must include the following information:

(1) a description of each incident, including a description of the dangerous weapon involved in the incident;

(2) where, at what time, and under what circumstances the incident occurred;

(3) information about the offender, other than the offender's name, including the offender's age; whether the offender was a student and, if so, where the offender attended school; and whether the offender was under school expulsion or suspension at the time of the incident;

(4) information about the victim other than the victim's name, if any, including the victim's age; whether the victim was a student and, if so, where the victim attended school; and if the victim was not a student, whether the victim was employed at the school;

(5) the cost of the incident to the school and to the victim; and

(6) the action taken by the school administration to respond to the incident.

The commissioner shall provide an electronic reporting format that allows school districts to provide aggregate data.

3. Reports; filing requirements. By July 31 of each year, each public school shall report incidents involving the use or possession of a dangerous weapon in school zones to the commissioner. The reports must be submitted using the electronic reporting system developed by the commissioner under subdivision 2. The commissioner shall compile the information it receives from the schools and report it annually to the commissioner of public safety and the legislature.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Students with chronic disciplinary issues
Statute

LAWS

260A.02. Definitions.

1. Scope. The definitions in this section apply to this chapter.

2. Board. "Board" means a school attendance review board created under section 260A.05.

3. Continuing truant. "Continuing truant" means a child who is subject to the compulsory instruction requirements of section 120A.22 and is absent from instruction in a school, as defined in section 120A.05, without valid excuse within a single school year for:

(1) three days if the child is in elementary school; or

(2) three or more class periods on three days if the child is in middle school, junior high school, or high school.

Nothing in this section shall prevent a school district or charter school from notifying a truant child's parent or legal guardian of the child's truancy or otherwise addressing a child's attendance problems prior to the child becoming a continuing truant.

260C.007. Definitions.

19. Habitual truant. "Habitual truant" means a child under the age of 17 years who is absent from attendance at school without lawful excuse for seven school days per school year if the child is in elementary school or for one or more class periods on seven school days per school year if the child is in middle school, junior high school, or high school or a child who is 17 years of age who is absent from attendance at school without lawful excuse for one or more class periods on seven school days per school year and who has not lawfully withdrawn from school under section 120A.22, subdivision 8.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Attendance and truancy
Statute

LAWS

120A.22. Compulsory instruction.

1. Parental responsibility. The parent of a child is primarily responsible for assuring that the child acquires knowledge and skills that are essential for effective citizenship.

1a. Noncustodial parent access to records. Upon request, a noncustodial parent has the right of access to, and to receive copies of, school records and information, to attend conferences, and to be informed about the child's welfare, educational progress, and status, as authorized under section 518.17, subdivision 3. The school is not required to hold a separate conference for each parent.

2. Applicability. This section and sections 120A.24; 120A.26; 120A.32; and 120A.34 apply only to a child required to receive instruction according to subdivision 5 and to instruction that is intended to fulfill that requirement.

3. Parent defined; residency determined.

(a) In this section and sections 120A.24 and 120A.26, "parent" means a parent, guardian, or other person having legal custody of a child.

(b) In sections 125A.03 to 125A.24 and 125A.65, "parent" means a parent, guardian, or other person having legal custody of a child under age 18. For an unmarried pupil age 18 or over, "parent" means the pupil unless a guardian or conservator has been appointed, in which case it means the guardian or conservator

(c) For purposes of sections 125A.03 to 125A.24 and 125A.65, the school district of residence for an unmarried pupil age 18 or over who is a parent under paragraph (b) and who is placed in a center for care and treatment, shall be the school district in which the pupil's biological or adoptive parent or designated guardian resides.

(d) For a married pupil age 18 or over, the school district of residence is the school district in which the married pupil resides.

(e) If a district reasonably believes that a student does not meet the residency requirements of the school district in which the student is attending school, the student may be removed from the school only after the district sends the student's parents written notice of the district's belief, including the facts upon which the belief is based, and an opportunity to provide documentary evidence of residency in person to the superintendent or designee, or, at the option of the parents, by sending the documentary evidence to the superintendent, or a designee, who will then make a determination as to the residency status of the student.

4. School defined. For the purpose of compulsory attendance, a "school" means a public school, as defined in section 120A.05, subdivisions 9, 11, 13, and 17, or a nonpublic school, church or religious organization, or home school in which a child is provided instruction in compliance with this section and section 120A.24.

5. Ages and terms.

(a) Every child between seven and 17 years of age must receive instruction unless the child has graduated. Every child under the age of seven who is enrolled in a half-day kindergarten, or a full-day kindergarten program on alternate days, or other kindergarten programs shall receive instruction. Except as provided in subdivision 6, a parent may withdraw a child under the age of seven from enrollment at any time.

(b) A school district by annual board action may require children subject to this subdivision to receive instruction in summer school. A district that acts to require children to receive instruction in summer school shall establish at the time of its action the criteria for determining which children must receive instruction.

(c) A pupil 16 years of age or older who meets the criteria of section 124D.68, subdivision 2, and under clause (5) of that subdivision has been excluded or expelled from school or under clause (11) of that subdivision has been chronically truant may be referred to an area learning center. Such referral may be made only after consulting the principal, area learning center director, student, and parent or guardian and only if, in the school administrator's professional judgment, the referral is in the best educational interest of the pupil. Nothing in this paragraph limits a pupil's eligibility to apply to enroll in other eligible programs under section 124D.68

6. Children under seven.

(a) Once a pupil under the age of seven is enrolled in kindergarten or a higher grade in a public school, the pupil is subject to the compulsory attendance provisions of this chapter and section 120A.34, unless the board of the district in which the pupil is enrolled has a policy that exempts children under seven from this subdivision.

(b) In a district in which children under seven are subject to compulsory attendance under this subdivision, paragraphs (c) to (e) apply.

(c) A parent or guardian may withdraw the pupil from enrollment in the school for good cause by notifying the district. Good cause includes, but is not limited to, enrollment of the pupil in another school, as defined in subdivision 4, or the immaturity of the child.

(d) When the pupil enrolls, the enrolling official must provide the parent or guardian who enrolls the pupil with a written explanation of the provisions of this subdivision.

(e) A pupil under the age of seven who is withdrawn from enrollment in the public school under paragraph (c) is no longer subject to the compulsory attendance provisions of this chapter.

(f) In a district that had adopted a policy to exempt children under seven from this subdivision, the district's chief attendance officer must keep the truancy enforcement authorities supplied with a copy of the board's current policy certified by the clerk of the board.

7. Education records.

(a) A district, a charter school, or a nonpublic school that receives services or aid under sections 123B.40 to 123B.48 from which a student is transferring must transmit the student's educational records, within ten business days of a request, to the district, the charter school, or the nonpublic school in which the student is enrolling. Districts, charter schools, and nonpublic schools that receive services or aid under sections 123B.40 to 123B.48 must make reasonable efforts to determine the district, the charter school, or the nonpublic school in which a transferring student is next enrolling in order to comply with this subdivision.

(b) A closed charter school must transfer the student's educational records, within ten business days of the school's closure, to the student's school district of residence where the records must be retained unless the records are otherwise transferred under this subdivision.

(c) A school district, a charter school, or a nonpublic school that receives services or aid under sections 123B.40 to 123B.48 that transmits a student's educational records to another school district or other educational entity, charter school, or nonpublic school to which the student is transferring must include in the transmitted records information about any formal suspension, expulsion, and exclusion disciplinary action under sections 121A.40 to 121A.56. The district, the charter school, or the nonpublic school that receives services or aid under sections 123B.40 to 123B.48 must provide notice to a student and the student's parent or guardian that formal disciplinary records will be transferred as part of the student's educational record, in accordance with data practices under chapter 13 and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, United States Code, title 20, section 1232(g).

(d) Notwithstanding section 138.17, a principal or chief administrative officer must remove from a student's educational record and destroy a probable cause notice received under section 260B.171, subdivision 5, or paragraph (e), if one year has elapsed since the date of the notice and the principal or chief administrative officer has not received a disposition or court order related to the offense described in the notice. This paragraph does not apply if the student no longer attends the school when this one-year period expires.

(e) A principal or chief administrative officer who receives a probable cause notice under section 260B.171, subdivision 5, or a disposition or court order, must include a copy of that data in the student's educational records if they are transmitted to another school, unless the data are required to be destroyed under paragraph (d) or section 121A.75.

8. Withdrawal from school. Any student who is 17 years old who seeks to withdraw from school, and the student's parent or guardian must:

(1) attend a meeting with school personnel to discuss the educational opportunities available to the student, including alternative educational opportunities; and

(2) sign a written election to withdraw from school.

9. Knowledge and skills. Instruction must be provided in at least the following subject areas:

(1) basic communication skills including reading and writing, literature, and fine arts;

(2) mathematics and science;

(3) social studies including history, geography, economics, government, and citizenship; and

(4) health and physical education.

Instruction, textbooks, and materials must be in the English language. Another language may be used pursuant to sections 124D.59 to 124D.61.

10. Requirements for instructors. A person who is providing instruction to a child must meet at least one of the following requirements:

(1) hold a valid Minnesota teaching license in the field and for the grade level taught;

(2) be directly supervised by a person holding a valid Minnesota teaching license;

(3) successfully complete a teacher competency examination;

(4) provide instruction in a school that is accredited by an accrediting agency, recognized according to section 123B.445, or recognized by the commissioner;

(5) hold a baccalaureate degree; or

(6) be the parent of a child who is assessed according to the procedures in subdivision 11.

Any person providing instruction in a public school must meet the requirements of clause (1).

11. Assessment of performance.

(a) Each year the performance of every child ages seven through 16 and every child ages 16 through 17 for which an initial report was filed pursuant to section 120A.24, subdivision 1, after the child is 16 and who is not enrolled in a public school must be assessed using a nationally norm-referenced standardized achievement examination. The superintendent of the district in which the child receives instruction and the person in charge of the child's instruction must agree about the specific examination to be used and the administration and location of the examination.

(b) To the extent the examination in paragraph (a) does not provide assessment in all of the subject areas in subdivision 9, the parent must assess the child's performance in the applicable subject area. This requirement applies only to a parent who provides instruction and does not meet the requirements of subdivision 10, clause (1), (2), or (3).

(c) If the results of the assessments in paragraphs (a) and (b) indicate that the child's performance on the total battery score is at or below the 30th percentile or one grade level below the performance level for children of the same age, the parent must obtain additional evaluation of the child's abilities and performance for the purpose of determining whether the child has learning problems.

(d) A child receiving instruction from a nonpublic school, person, or institution that is accredited by an accrediting agency, recognized according to section 123B.445, or recognized by the commissioner, is exempt from the requirements of this subdivision.

12. Legitimate exemptions.

(a) A parent, guardian, or other person having control of a child may apply to a school district to have the child excused from attendance for the whole or any part of the time school is in session during any school year. Application may be made to any member of the board, a truant officer, a principal, or the superintendent. The school district may state in its school attendance policy that it may ask the student's parent or legal guardian to verify in writing the reason for the child's absence from school. A note from a physician or a licensed mental health professional stating that the child cannot attend school is a valid excuse. The board of the district in which the child resides may approve the application upon the following being demonstrated to the satisfaction of that board:

(1) that the child's physical or mental health is such as to prevent attendance at school or application to study for the period required, which includes:

(i) child illness, medical, dental, orthodontic, or counseling appointments;

(ii) family emergencies;

(iii) the death or serious illness or funeral of an immediate family member;

(iv) active duty in any military branch of the United States;

(v) the child has a condition that requires ongoing treatment for a mental health diagnosis; or

(vi) other exemptions included in the district's school attendance policy;

(2) that the child has already completed state and district standards required for graduation from high school; or

(3) that it is the wish of the parent, guardian, or other person having control of the child, that the child attend for a period or periods not exceeding in the aggregate three hours in any week, a school for religious instruction conducted and maintained by some church, or association of churches, or any Sunday school association incorporated under the laws of this state, or any auxiliary thereof. This school for religious instruction must be conducted and maintained in a place other than a public school building, and it must not, in whole or in part, be conducted and maintained at public expense. However, a child may be absent from school on such days as the child attends upon instruction according to the ordinances of some church

(b) Notwithstanding subdivision 6, paragraph (a), a parent may withdraw a child from an all-day, every day kindergarten program and put their child in a half-day program, if offered, or an alternate-day program without being truant. A school board must excuse a kindergarten child from a part of a school day at the request of the child's parent.

13. Issuing and reporting excuses. The clerk or any authorized officer of the board must issue and keep a record of such excuses, under such rules as the board may from time to time establish.

120A.24. Reporting.

4. Reports to the state. A superintendent must make an annual report to the commissioner of education by December 1 of the total number of nonpublic children reported as residing in the district. The report must include the following information:

(1) the number of children residing in the district attending nonpublic schools or receiving instruction from persons or institutions other than a public school;

(2) the number of children in clause (1) who are in compliance with section 120A.22 and this section; and

(3) the number of children in clause (1) who the superintendent has determined are not in compliance with section 120A.22 and this section.

5. Obligations. Nothing in this section alleviates the obligations under section 120A.22.

120A.26. Enforcement and prosecution.

1. [Repealed, 1Sp2011 c 11 art 1 s 37]

2. [Repealed, 1Sp2011 c 11 art 1 s 37]

3. Notice to parents. The superintendent must notify the parent, in writing, if a child is alleged to be receiving instruction in violation of sections 120A.22 and 120A.24. The written notification must include a list of the specific alleged violations.

4. Fact-finding and mediation. If the specified alleged violations of the compulsory attendance requirements are not corrected within 15 days of receipt of the written notification, the superintendent must request fact-finding and mediation services from the commissioner.

5. Notice to county attorney. If the alleged violations are not corrected through the fact-finding and mediation process under subdivision 4, the superintendent must notify the county attorney of the alleged violations. The superintendent must notify the parents, by certified mail, of the superintendent's intent to notify the county attorney of the alleged violations.

6. Criminal complaint; prosecution. The county attorney in the county in which the alleged violations have occurred has jurisdiction to conduct a prosecution for violations of this section, section 120A.22, or section 120A.24. A criminal complaint may be filed in any court in the county exercising criminal jurisdiction and must name the persons neglecting or refusing to comply with this section, section 120A.22, or section 120A.24. After the complaint has been filed, a warrant must be issued and proceedings in trial must commence as provided by law in misdemeanor cases.

120A.32. Officers, teachers; Neglect of duty, penalty.

Any school officer, truant officer, public or nonpublic school teacher, principal, district superintendent, or person providing instruction other than a parent refusing, willfully failing, or neglecting to perform any duty imposed by sections 120A.22, 120A.26, 120A.35, 120A.41, and 123B.03 is guilty of a misdemeanor. All persons found guilty shall be punished for each offense by a fine of not more than $10 or by imprisonment for not more than ten days. All fines, when collected, shall be paid into the county treasury for the benefit of the school district in which the offense is committed.

120A.34. Violations; Penalties.

Any person who fails or refuses to provide for instruction of a child of whom the person has legal custody, and who is required by section 120A.22, subdivision 5, to receive instruction, when notified so to do by a truant officer or other official, or any person who induces or attempts to induce any child unlawfully to be absent from school, or who knowingly harbors or employs, while school is in session, any child unlawfully absent from school, shall be guilty of a petty misdemeanor. Any fines collected shall be paid into the county treasury for the benefit of the school district in which the offense is committed.'

124D.03. Enrollment options program.

12. Termination of enrollment. A district may terminate the enrollment of a nonresident student enrolled under this section or section 124D.08 at the end of a school year if the student meets the definition of a habitual truant under section 260C.007, subdivision 19, the student has been provided appropriate services under chapter 260A, and the student's case has been referred to juvenile court. A district may also terminate the enrollment of a nonresident student over the age of 17 enrolled under this section if the student is absent without lawful excuse for one or more periods on 15 school days and has not lawfully withdrawn from school under section 120A.22, subdivision 8.

260A.01. Truancy programs and services.

(a) The programs in this chapter are designed to provide a continuum of intervention and services to support families and children in keeping children in school and combating truancy and educational neglect. School districts, county attorneys, and law enforcement may establish the programs and coordinate them with other community-based truancy services in order to provide the necessary and most effective intervention for children and their families. This continuum of intervention and services involves progressively intrusive intervention, beginning with strong service-oriented efforts at the school and community level and involving the court's authority only when necessary.

(b) Consistent with section 125A.091, subdivision 5, a parent's refusal to provide the parent's child with sympathomimetic medications does not constitute educational neglect.

260A.02. Definitions.

1. Scope. The definitions in this section apply to this chapter.

2. Board. "Board" means a school attendance review board created under section 260A.05.

3. Continuing truant. "Continuing truant" means a child who is subject to the compulsory instruction requirements of section 120A.22 and is absent from instruction in a school, as defined in section 120A.05, without valid excuse within a single school year for:

(1) three days if the child is in elementary school; or

(2) three or more class periods on three days if the child is in middle school, junior high school, or high school.

Nothing in this section shall prevent a school district or charter school from notifying a truant child's parent or legal guardian of the child's truancy or otherwise addressing a child's attendance problems prior to the child becoming a continuing truant.

260A.03. Notice to parent or guardian when child is a continuing truant.

Upon a child's initial classification as a continuing truant, the school attendance officer or other designated school official shall notify the child's parent or legal guardian, by first-class mail or other reasonable means, of the following:

(1) that the child is truant;

(2) that the parent or guardian should notify the school if there is a valid excuse for the child's absences;

(3) that the parent or guardian is obligated to compel the attendance of the child at school pursuant to section 120A.22 and parents or guardians who fail to meet this obligation may be subject to prosecution under section 120A.34;

(4) that this notification serves as the notification required by section 120A.34;

(5) that alternative educational programs and services may be available in the child's enrolling or resident district;

(6) that the parent or guardian has the right to meet with appropriate school personnel to discuss solutions to the child's truancy;

(7) that if the child continues to be truant, the parent and child may be subject to juvenile court proceedings under chapter 260C;

(8) that if the child is subject to juvenile court proceedings, the child may be subject to suspension, restriction, or delay of the child's driving privilege pursuant to section 260C.201; and

(9) that it is recommended that the parent or guardian accompany the child to school and attend classes with the child for one day.

260A.04. Community-based truancy projects and service centers

1. Establishment.

(a) Community-based truancy projects and service centers may be established to:

(1) provide for identification of students with school attendance problems;

(2) facilitate the provision of services geared to address the underlying issues that are contributing to a student's truant behavior; and

(3) provide facilities to receive truant students from peace officers and probation officers.

(b) Truancy projects and service centers may provide any of these services and shall provide for referral of children and families to other appropriate programs and services.

2. Community-based action projects. Schools, community agencies, law enforcement, parent associations, and other interested groups may cooperate to provide coordinated intervention, prevention, and educational services for truant students and their families. Services may include:

(1) assessment for underlying issues that are contributing to the child's truant behavior;

(2) referral to other community-based services for the child and family, such as individual or family counseling, educational testing, psychological evaluations, tutoring, mentoring, and mediation;

(3) transition services to integrate the child back into school and to help the child succeed once there;

(4) culturally sensitive programming and staffing; and

(5) increased school response, including in-school suspension, better attendance monitoring and enforcement, after-school study programs, and in-service training for teachers and staff.

3. Truancy service centers.

(a) Truancy service centers may be established as facilities to receive truant students from peace officers and probation officers and provide other appropriate services. A truancy service center may:

(1) assess a truant student's attendance situation, including enrollment status, verification of truancy, and school attendance history;

(2) assist in coordinating intervention efforts where appropriate, including checking with juvenile probation and children and family services to determine whether an active case is pending and facilitating transfer to an appropriate facility, if indicated; and evaluating the need for and making referral to a health clinic, chemical dependency treatment, protective services, social or recreational programs, or other school or community-based services and programs described in subdivision 2;

(3) contact the parents or legal guardian of the truant student and release the truant student to the custody of the parents, guardian, or other suitable person; and

(4) facilitate the student's earliest possible return to school.

(b) Truancy service centers may not accept:

(1) juveniles taken into custody for violations of law that would be crimes if committed by adults;

(2) intoxicated juveniles;

(3) ill or injured juveniles; or

(4) juveniles older than mandatory school attendance age.

(c) Truancy service centers may expand their service capability in order to receive curfew violators and take appropriate action, such as coordination of intervention efforts, contacting parents, and developing strategies to ensure that parents assume responsibility for their children's curfew violations.

260A.05. School attendance review boards.

1. Establishment. A school district or charter school may establish one or more school attendance review boards to exercise the powers and duties in this section. The school district or charter school board shall appoint the members of the school attendance review board and designate the schools within the board's jurisdiction. Members of a school attendance review board may include:

(1) the superintendent of the school district or the superintendent's designee or charter school director or the director's designee;

(2) a principal and one or more other school officials from within the district or charter school;

(3) parent representatives;

(4) representatives from community agencies that provide services for truant students and their families;

(5) a juvenile probation officer;

(6) school counselors and attendance officers; and

(7) law enforcement officers.

2. General powers and duties. A school attendance review board shall prepare an annual plan to promote interagency and community cooperation and to reduce duplication of services for students with school attendance problems. The plan shall include a description of truancy procedures and services currently in operation within the board's jurisdiction, including the programs and services under section 260A.04. A board may provide consultant services to, and coordinate activities of, truancy programs and services. If a board determines that it will be unable to provide services for all truant students who are referred to it, the board shall establish procedures and criteria for determining whether to accept referrals of students or refer them for other appropriate action.

3. Oversight of truant students. A school attendance review board shall oversee referrals of truant students and provide appropriate intervention and services under section 260A.06. The board shall establish procedures for documenting student attendance and verifying actions and interventions with respect to truant students and their families.

260A.07. County attorney truancy mediation program.

1. Establishment; referrals. A county attorney may establish a truancy mediation program for the purpose of resolving truancy problems without court action. If a student is in a school district or charter school that has established a school attendance review board, the student may be referred to the county attorney under section 260A.06, subdivision 3. If the student's school district or charter school has not established a board, the student may be referred to the county attorney by the school district or charter school if the student continues to be truant after the parent or guardian has been sent or conveyed the notice under section 260A.03.

2. Meeting; notice. The county attorney may request the parent or legal guardian and the child referred under subdivision 1 to attend a meeting to discuss the possible legal consequences of the minor's truancy. The notice of the meeting must be served personally or by certified mail at least five days before the meeting on each person required to attend the meeting. The notice must include:

(1) the name and address of the person to whom the notice is directed;

(2) the date, time, and place of the meeting;

(3) the name of the minor classified as a truant;

(4) the basis for the referral to the county attorney;

(5) a warning that a criminal complaint may be filed against the parents or guardians pursuant to section 120A.34 for failure to compel the attendance of the minor at school or that action may be taken in juvenile court; and

(6) a statement that the meeting is voluntary.

260C.007. Definitions.

19. Habitual truant. "Habitual truant" means a child under the age of 17 years who is absent from attendance at school without lawful excuse for seven school days per school year if the child is in elementary school or for one or more class periods on seven school days per school year if the child is in middle school, junior high school, or high school or a child who is 17 years of age who is absent from attendance at school without lawful excuse for one or more class periods on seven school days per school year and who has not lawfully withdrawn from school under section 120A.22, subdivision 8.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Substance use
Statute

LAWS

121A.29. Reporting; chemical abuse.

1. Teacher's duty. A teacher in a nonpublic school participating in a school district chemical use program, or a public school teacher, who knows or has reason to believe that a student is using, possessing, or transferring alcohol or a controlled substance while on the school premises or involved in school-related activities, shall immediately notify the school's chemical abuse preassessment team of this information. A teacher who complies with this section shall be defended and indemnified under section 466.07, subdivision 1, in any action for damages arising out of the compliance.

2. Other reports. Nothing in this section prevents a teacher or any other school employee from reporting to a law enforcement agency any violation of law occurring on school premises or at school sponsored events.

121A.61. Discipline and removal of students from class.

3. Policy components. The policy must include at least the following components:

(m) procedures for detecting and addressing chemical abuse problems of a student while on the school premises;

122A.66. Teacher training; effects of drugs and alcohol

All educational institutions providing teacher education must offer a program in the personal use and misuse of and dependency on tobacco, alcohol, drugs and other chemicals. Every student attending educational institutions in preparation for teaching service shall be required to take and to satisfactorily complete a program under this section.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Bullying, harassment, or hazing
Statute

LAWS

121A.031. School student bullying policy.

1. Student bullying policy; scope and application.

(a) This section applies to bullying by a student against another student enrolled in a public school and which occurs:

(1) on the school premises, at the school functions or activities, or on the school transportation;

(2) by use of electronic technology and communications on the school premises, during the school functions or activities, on the school transportation, or on the school computers, networks, forums, and mailing lists; or

(3) by use of electronic technology and communications off the school premises to the extent such use substantially and materially disrupts student learning or the school environment.

(b) A nonpublic school under section 123B.41, subdivision 9, consistent with its school accreditation cycle, is encouraged to electronically transmit to the commissioner its antibullying policy, if any, and any summary data on its bullying incidents.

(c) This section does not apply to a home school under sections 120A.22, subdivision 4, and 120A.24, or a nonpublic school under section 123B.41, subdivision 9.

(d) A school-aged child who voluntarily participates in a public school activity, such as a cocurricular or extracurricular activity, is subject to the same student bullying policy provisions applicable to the public school students participating in the activity.

2. Definitions.

(a) For purposes of this section, the following terms have the meanings given them.

(b) "District" means a district under section 120A.05, subdivision 8.

(c) "Public school" or "school" means a public school under section 120A.05, subdivisions 9, 11, 13, and 17, and a charter school under chapter 124E.

(d) "Student" means a student enrolled in a school under paragraph (c).

(e) "Bullying" means intimidating, threatening, abusive, or harming conduct that is objectively offensive and:

(1) there is an actual or perceived imbalance of power between the student engaging in prohibited conduct and the target of the behavior and the conduct is repeated or forms a pattern; or

(2) materially and substantially interferes with a student's educational opportunities or performance or ability to participate in school functions or activities or receive school benefits, services, or privileges.

(f) "Cyberbullying" means bullying using technology or other electronic communication, including but not limited to a transfer of a sign, signal, writing, image, sound, or data, including a post on a social network Internet Web site or forum, transmitted through a computer, cell phone, or other electronic device.

(g) Intimidating, threatening, abusive, or harming conduct may involve, but is not limited to, conduct that causes physical harm to a student or a student's property or causes a student to be in reasonable fear of harm to person or property; under Minnesota common law, violates a student's reasonable expectation of privacy, defames a student, or constitutes intentional infliction of emotional distress against a student; is directed at any student or students, including those based on a person's actual or perceived race, ethnicity, color, creed, religion, national origin, immigration status, sex, marital status, familial status, socioeconomic status, physical appearance, sexual orientation, including gender identity and expression, academic status related to student performance, disability, or status with regard to public assistance, age, or any additional characteristic defined in chapter 363A. However, prohibited conduct need not be based on any particular characteristic defined in this paragraph or chapter 363A.

(h) "Prohibited conduct" means bullying or cyberbullying as defined under this subdivision or retaliation for asserting, alleging, reporting, or providing information about such conduct or knowingly making a false report about bullying.

(i) "Remedial response" means a measure to stop and correct prohibited conduct, prevent prohibited conduct from recurring, and protect, support, and intervene on behalf of the student who is the target of the prohibited conduct. Districts and schools may seek the assistance of the school safety technical assistance center under section 127A.052 to develop and implement remedial responses on behalf of a student who is the target of prohibited conduct, to stop and correct a student engaging in prohibited conduct, and for use with students and adults in the school community.

3. Local district and school policy.

(a) Districts and schools, in consultation with students, parents, and community organizations, to the extent practicable, shall adopt, implement, and, on a cycle consistent with other district policies, review, and revise where appropriate, a written policy to prevent and prohibit student bullying consistent with this section. The policy must conform with sections 121A.41 to 121A.56. A district or school must adopt and implement a local policy under subdivisions 3 to 5 or comply with the provisions of the state model policy in subdivision 6.

(b) Each local district and school policy must establish research-based, developmentally appropriate best practices that include preventive and remedial measures and effective discipline for deterring policy violations; apply throughout the school or district; and foster active student, parent, and community participation. A district or school may request assistance from the school safety technical assistance center under section 127A.052 in complying with local policy requirements. The policy shall:

(1) define the roles and responsibilities of students, school personnel, and volunteers under the policy;

(2) specifically list the characteristics contained in subdivision 2, paragraph (g);

(3) emphasize remedial responses;

(4) be conspicuously posted in the administrative offices of the school and school district in summary form;

(5) be given to each school employee and independent contractor, if a contractor regularly interacts with students, at the time of employment with the district or school;

(6) be included in the student handbook on school policies; and

(7) be available to all parents and other school community members in an electronic format in the languages appearing on the district or school Web site, consistent with the district policies and practices.

(c) Consistent with its applicable policies and practices, each district and school under this subdivision must discuss its policy with students, school personnel, and volunteers and provide appropriate training for all school personnel to prevent, identify, and respond to prohibited conduct. Districts and schools must establish a training cycle, not to exceed a period of three school years, for school personnel under this paragraph. Newly employed school personnel must receive the training within the first year of their employment with the district or school. A district or school administrator may accelerate the training cycle or provide additional training based on a particular need or circumstance.

(d) Each district and school under this subdivision must submit an electronic copy of its prohibited conduct policy to the commissioner.

4. Local policy components.

(a) Each district and school policy implemented under this section must, at a minimum:

(1) designate a staff member as the primary contact person in the school building to receive reports of prohibited conduct under clause (3), ensure the policy and its procedures including restorative practices, consequences, and sanctions are fairly and fully implemented, and serve as the primary contact on policy and procedural matters implicating both the district or school and the department;

(2) require school employees who witness prohibited conduct or possess reliable information that would lead a reasonable person to suspect that a student is a target of prohibited conduct to make reasonable efforts to address and resolve the prohibited conduct;

(3) provide a procedure to begin to investigate reports of prohibited conduct within three school days of the report, and make the primary contact person responsible for the investigation and any resulting record and for keeping and regulating access to any record;

(4) indicate how a school will respond to an identified incident of prohibited conduct, including immediately intervening to protect the target of the prohibited conduct; at the school administrator's discretion and consistent with state and federal data practices law governing access to data, including section 13.02, subdivision 8, a presumption that a district or school official will notify the parent of the reported target of the prohibited conduct and the parent of the actor engaged in the prohibited conduct; providing other remedial responses to the prohibited conduct; and ensuring that remedial responses are tailored to the particular incident and nature of the conduct and the student's developmental age and behavioral history;

(5) prohibit reprisals or retaliation against any person who asserts, alleges, or reports prohibited conduct or provides information about such conduct and establish appropriate consequences for a person who engages in reprisal or retaliation;

(6) allow anonymous reporting but do not rely solely on an anonymous report to determine discipline;

(7) provide information about available community resources to the target, actor, and other affected individuals, as appropriate;

(8) where appropriate for a child with a disability to prevent or respond to prohibited conduct, allow the child's individualized education program or section 504 plan to address the skills and proficiencies the child needs to respond to or not engage in prohibited conduct;

(9) use new employee training materials, the school publication on school rules, procedures, and standards of conduct, and the student handbook on school policies to publicize the policy;

(10) require ongoing professional development, consistent with section 122A.60, to build the skills of all school personnel who regularly interact with students, including but not limited to educators, administrators, school counselors, social workers, psychologists, other school mental health professionals, school nurses, cafeteria workers, custodians, bus drivers, athletic coaches, extracurricular activities advisors, and paraprofessionals to identify, prevent, and appropriately address prohibited conduct;

(11) allow the alleged actor in an investigation of prohibited conduct to present a defense; and

(12) inform affected students and their parents of their rights under state and federal data practices laws to obtain access to data related to the incident and their right to contest the accuracy or completeness of the data.

(b) Professional development under a local policy includes, but is not limited to, information about:

(1) developmentally appropriate strategies both to prevent and to immediately and effectively intervene to stop prohibited conduct;

(2) the complex dynamics affecting an actor, target, and witnesses to prohibited conduct;

(3) research on prohibited conduct, including specific categories of students at risk for prohibited conduct in school;

(4) the incidence and nature of cyberbullying; and

(5) Internet safety and cyberbullying.

5. Safe and supportive schools programming.

(a) Districts and schools are encouraged to provide developmentally appropriate programmatic instruction to help students identify, prevent, and reduce prohibited conduct; value diversity in school and society; develop and improve students' knowledge and skills for solving problems, managing conflict, engaging in civil discourse, and recognizing, responding to, and reporting prohibited conduct; and make effective prevention and intervention programs available to students. Upon request, the school safety technical assistance center under section 127A.052 must assist a district or school in helping students understand social media and cyberbullying. Districts and schools must establish strategies for creating a positive school climate and use evidence-based social-emotional learning to prevent and reduce discrimination and other improper conduct.

(b) Districts and schools are encouraged to:

(1) engage all students in creating a safe and supportive school environment;

(2) partner with parents and other community members to develop and implement prevention and intervention programs;

(3) engage all students and adults in integrating education, intervention, and other remedial responses into the school environment;

(4) train student bystanders to intervene in and report incidents of prohibited conduct to the school's primary contact person;

(5) teach students to advocate for themselves and others;

(6) prevent inappropriate referrals to special education of students who may engage in prohibited conduct; and

(7) foster student collaborations that foster a safe and supportive school climate.

6. State model policy.

(a) The commissioner, in consultation with the commissioner of human rights, shall develop and maintain a state model policy. A district or school that does not adopt and implement a local policy under subdivisions 3 to 5 must implement and may supplement the provisions of the state model policy. The commissioner must assist districts and schools under this subdivision to implement the state policy. The state model policy must:

(1) define prohibited conduct, consistent with this section;

(2) apply the prohibited conduct policy components in this section;

(3) for a child with a disability, whenever an evaluation by an individualized education program team or a section 504 team indicates that the child's disability affects the child's social skills development or the child is vulnerable to prohibited conduct because of the child's disability, the child's individualized education program or section 504 plan may address the skills and proficiencies the child needs to not engage in and respond to such conduct; and

(4) encourage violence prevention and character development education programs under section 120B.232, subdivision 1.

(b) The commissioner shall develop and post departmental procedures for:

(1) periodically reviewing district and school programs and policies for compliance with this section;

(2) investigating, reporting, and responding to noncompliance with this section, which may include an annual review of plans to improve and provide a safe and supportive school climate; and

(3) allowing students, parents, and educators to file a complaint about noncompliance with the commissioner.

(c) The commissioner must post on the department's Web site information indicating that when districts and schools allow non-curriculum-related student groups access to school facilities, the district or school must give all student groups equal access to the school facilities regardless of the content of the group members' speech.

7. Relation to existing law.

(a)This section does not:

(1) establish any private right of action;

(2) limit rights currently available to an individual under other civil or criminal law, including, but not limited to, chapter 363A; or

(3) interfere with a person's rights of religious expression and free speech and expression under the First Amendment of the United States Constitution.

121A.69. Hazing policy.

1. Definitions.

(a) "Hazing" means committing an act against a student, or coercing a student into committing an act, that creates a substantial risk of harm to a person in order for the student to be initiated into or affiliated with a student organization.

(b) "Student organization" means a group, club, or organization having students as its primary members or participants.

2. Model policy. The commissioner of education shall maintain and make available to school boards a model policy on student or staff hazing that addresses the requirements of subdivision 3.

3. School board policy. Each school board shall adopt a written policy governing student or staff hazing. The policy must apply to student behavior that occurs on or off school property and during and after school hours and be consistent with section 121A.031. The policy must include reporting procedures and disciplinary consequences for violating the policy. Disciplinary consequences must be sufficiently severe to deter violations and appropriately discipline prohibited behavior. Disciplinary consequences must conform with sections 121A.031 and 121A.41. to 121A.56. Each school must include the policy in the student handbook on school policies.

125B.15. Internet access for students.

(a) Recognizing the difference between school libraries, school computer labs, and school media centers, which serve unique educational purposes, and public libraries, which are designed for public inquiry, all computers at a school site with access to the Internet available for student use must be equipped to restrict, including by use of available software filtering technology or other effective methods, all student access to material that is reasonably believed to be obscene or child pornography or material harmful to minors under federal or state law.

(b) A school site is not required to purchase filtering technology if the school site would incur more than incidental expense in making the purchase.

(c) A school district receiving technology revenue under section 125B.26 must prohibit, including through use of available software filtering technology or other effective methods, adult access to material that under federal or state law is reasonably believed to be obscene or child pornography.

(d) A school district, its agents or employees, are immune from liability for failure to comply with this section if they have made a good faith effort to comply with the requirements of this section.

(e) "School site" means an education site as defined in section 123B.04, subdivision 1, or charter school under chapter 124E.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Other special infractions or conditions
Statute

LAWS

121A.69. Hazing policy.

1. Definitions.

(a) "Hazing" means committing an act against a student, or coercing a student into committing an act, that creates a substantial risk of harm to a person in order for the student to be initiated into or affiliated with a student organization.

(b) "Student organization" means a group, club, or organization having students as its primary members or participants.

2. Model policy. The commissioner of education shall maintain and make available to school boards a model policy on student or staff hazing that addresses the requirements of subdivision 3.

3. School board policy. Each school board shall adopt a written policy governing student or staff hazing. The policy must apply to student behavior that occurs on or off school property and during and after school hours and be consistent with section 121A.031. The policy must include reporting procedures and disciplinary consequences for violating the policy. Disciplinary consequences must be sufficiently severe to deter violations and appropriately discipline prohibited behavior. Disciplinary consequences must conform with sections 121A.031 and 121A.41. to 121A.56. Each school must include the policy in the student handbook on school policies.

121A.70. Secret fraternities and societies.

1. Membership regulated. It is unlawful for any pupil, registered and attending any public school to join, become a member of, or to solicit any other pupil of any public school to join, or become a member of, any secret fraternity or society wholly or partially formed from the membership of pupils attending any public schools or to take part in the organization or formation of any fraternity or society, except societies or associations sanctioned by the district school board.

2. Penalties. A school board may suspend or dismiss any pupil from school, or prevent the pupil from graduating or participating in school honors when, after investigation, in the judgment of the board or a majority of its membership, the pupil is guilty of violating any of the provisions of this section or is guilty of violating any rule or regulation adopted by the board for the purpose of governing its schools, or enforcing this section.

3. "Rushing" or soliciting forbidden. It is a misdemeanor for any person, not a pupil of the schools, to be upon school grounds, or to enter any school building, for the purpose of "rushing" or soliciting any pupil of the schools to join any fraternity, society, or association organized outside of the schools. The district court has jurisdiction of offenses committed under this subdivision. All persons found guilty shall be fined not less than $2, nor more than $10, to be paid to the county treasurer or, upon failure to pay the fine, to be imprisoned for not more than ten days.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Major Category
Prevention and Behavioral Interventions (Non-Punitive)
Sub Category
Prevention
Statute

LAWS

121A.03. Model policy.

1. Model policy. The commissioner shall maintain and make available to school boards a model sexual, religious, and racial harassment and violence policy. The model policy shall address the requirements of subdivision 2, and may encourage violence prevention and character development education programs, consistent with section 120B.232, subdivision 1, to prevent and reduce policy violations.

120B.21. Mental health education.

School districts and charter schools are encouraged to provide mental health instruction for students in grades 6 through 12 aligned with local health standards and integrated into existing programs, curriculum, or the general school environment of a district or charter school. The commissioner, in consultation with the commissioner of human services and mental health organizations, is encouraged to provide districts and charter schools with:

(1) age-appropriate model learning activities for grades 6 through 12 that encompass the mental health components of the National Health Education Standards and the benchmarks developed by the department's quality teaching network in health and best practices in mental health education; and

(2) a directory of resources for planning and implementing age-appropriate mental health curriculum and instruction in grades 6 through 12.

120B.22. Violence prevention education.

1. Violence prevention curriculum.

(a) The commissioner of education, in consultation with the commissioners of health and human services, state minority councils, battered women's and domestic abuse programs, battered women's shelters, sexual assault centers, representatives of religious communities, and the assistant commissioner of the Office of Drug Policy and Violence Prevention, shall assist districts on request in developing or implementing a violence prevention program for students in kindergarten to grade 12 that can be integrated into existing curriculum. The purpose of the program is to help students learn how to resolve conflicts within their families and communities in nonviolent, effective ways.

(b) Each district is encouraged to integrate into its existing curriculum a program for violence prevention that includes at least:

(1) a comprehensive, accurate, and age appropriate curriculum on violence prevention, nonviolent conflict resolution, sexual, racial, and cultural harassment, self-protection, and student hazing that promotes equality, respect, understanding, effective communication, individual responsibility, thoughtful decision making, positive conflict resolution, useful coping skills, critical thinking, listening and watching skills, and personal safety;

(2) planning materials, guidelines, and other accurate information on preventing physical and emotional violence, identifying and reducing the incidence of sexual, racial, and cultural harassment, and reducing child abuse and neglect;

(3) a special parent education component of early childhood family education programs to prevent child abuse and neglect and to promote positive parenting skills, giving priority to services and outreach programs for at-risk families;

(4) involvement of parents and other community members, including the clergy, business representatives, civic leaders, local elected officials, law enforcement officials, and the county attorney;

(5) collaboration with local community services, agencies, and organizations that assist in violence intervention or prevention, including family-based services, crisis services, life management skills services, case coordination services, mental health services, and early intervention services;

(6) collaboration among districts and service cooperatives;

(7) targeting early adolescents for prevention efforts, especially early adolescents whose personal circumstances may lead to violent or harassing behavior;

(8) opportunities for teachers to receive in-service training or attend other programs on strategies or curriculum designed to assist students in intervening in or preventing violence in school and at home; and

(9) administrative policies that reflect, and a staff that models, nonviolent behaviors that do not display or condone sexual, racial, or cultural harassment or student hazing.

(c) The department may provide assistance at a neutral site to a nonpublic school participating in a district's program.

2. In-service training. Each district is encouraged to provide training for district staff and school board members on the following:

(1) helping students identify violence in the family and the community so that students may learn to resolve conflicts in effective, nonviolent ways

(2) responding to a disclosure of child sexual abuse in a supportive, appropriate manner; and

(3) complying with mandatory reporting requirements under section 626.556

The in-service training must be ongoing and involve experts familiar with sexual abuse, domestic violence, and personal safety issues.

3. Funding sources. Districts may accept funds from public and private sources for violence prevention programs developed and implemented under this section.

120B.232. Character development education.

1. Character development education.

(a) Character education is the shared responsibility of parents, teachers, and members of the community. The legislature encourages districts to integrate or offer instruction on character education including, but not limited to, character qualities such as attentiveness, truthfulness, respect for authority, diligence, gratefulness, self-discipline, patience, forgiveness, respect for others, peacemaking, and resourcefulness. Instruction should be integrated into a district's existing programs, curriculum, or the general school environment. To the extent practicable, instruction should be integrated into positive behavioral intervention strategies, under section 122A.627. The commissioner shall provide assistance at the request of a district to develop character education curriculum and programs.

(b) Character development education under paragraph (a) may include a voluntary elementary, middle, and high school program that incorporates the history and values of Congressional Medal of Honor recipients and may be offered as part of the social studies, English language arts, or other curriculum, as a schoolwide character building and veteran awareness initiative, or as an after-school program, among other possibilities.

1a. Staff development; continuing education.

(a) Staff development opportunities under section 122A.60 may include training in character development education that incorporates the history and values of Congressional Medal of Honor recipients under subdivision 1, paragraph (b), and is provided without cost to the interested school or district.

(b) Local continuing education and relicensure committees or other local relicensure committees under section 122A.18, subdivision 4, are encouraged to approve up to six clock hours of continuing education for licensed teachers who complete the training in character development education under paragraph (a).

2. Funding sources. The commissioner must first use federal funds for character development education programs to the extent available under United States Code, title 20, section 7247. Districts may accept funds from private and other public sources for character development education programs developed and implemented under this section, including programs funded through the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation, among other sources.

121A.031. School student bullying policy.

5. Safe and supportive schools programming.

(a) Districts and schools are encouraged to provide developmentally appropriate programmatic instruction to help students identify, prevent, and reduce prohibited conduct; value diversity in school and society; develop and improve students' knowledge and skills for solving problems, managing conflict, engaging in civil discourse, and recognizing, responding to, and reporting prohibited conduct; and make effective prevention and intervention programs available to students. Upon request, the school safety technical assistance center under section 127A.052 must assist a district or school in helping students understand social media and cyberbullying. Districts and schools must establish strategies for creating a positive school climate and use evidence-based social-emotional learning to prevent and reduce discrimination and other improper conduct.

(b) Districts and schools are encouraged to:

(1) engage all students in creating a safe and supportive school environment;

(2) partner with parents and other community members to develop and implement prevention and intervention programs;

(3) engage all students and adults in integrating education, intervention, and other remedial responses into the school environment;

(4) train student bystanders to intervene in and report incidents of prohibited conduct to the school's primary contact person;

(5) teach students to advocate for themselves and others;

(6) prevent inappropriate referrals to special education of students who may engage in prohibited conduct; and

(7) foster student collaborations that foster a safe and supportive school climate.

122A.627. Positive behavioral interventions and supports.

"Positive behavioral interventions and supports" or "PBIS" means an evidence-based framework for preventing problem behavior, providing instruction and support for positive and prosocial behaviors, and supporting social, emotional, and behavioral needs for all students. Schoolwide implementation of PBIS requires training, coaching, and evaluation for school staff to consistently implement the key components that make PBIS effective for all students, including:

(1) establishing, defining, teaching, and practicing three to five positively stated schoolwide behavioral expectations that are representative of the local community and cultures;

(2) developing and implementing a consistent system used by all staff to provide positive feedback and acknowledgment for students who display schoolwide behavioral expectations;

(3) developing and implementing a consistent and specialized support system for students who do not display behaviors representative of schoolwide positive expectations;

(4) developing a system to support decisions based on data related to student progress, effective implementation of behavioral practices, and screening for students requiring additional behavior supports;

(5) using a continuum of evidence-based interventions that is integrated and aligned to support academic and behavioral success for all students; and

(6) using a team-based approach to support effective implementation, monitor progress, and evaluate outcome

Consistent with section 120B.232, subdivision 1, character education curriculum and programs may be used to support implementation of the key components of PBIS.

124D.895. Parental involvement programs.

1. Program goals. The department, in consultation with the state curriculum advisory committee, must develop guidelines and model plans for parental involvement programs that will:

(1) engage the interests and talents of parents or guardians in recognizing and meeting the emotional, intellectual, native and English language development, and physical needs of their school-age children;

(2) promote healthy self-concepts among parents or guardians and other family members;

(3) offer parents or guardians a chance to share and learn about educational skills, techniques, and ideas;

(4) provide creative learning experiences for parents or guardians and their school-age children, including involvement from parents or guardians of color;

(5) encourage parents to actively participate in their district's curriculum advisory committee under section 120B.11 in order to assist the school board in improving children's education programs;

(6) encourage parents to help in promoting school desegregation/integration under sections 124D.861 and 124D.862; and

(7) partner with parents in establishing a positive school climate by developing and implementing prevention and intervention programs on prohibited conduct under section 121A.031.

2. Plan contents. Model plans for a parental involvement program must include at least the following:

(1) program goals;

(2) means for achieving program goals;

(3) methods for informing parents or guardians, in a timely way, about the program;

(4) strategies for ensuring the full participation of parents or guardians, including those parents or guardians who lack literacy skills or whose native language is not English, including the involvement of parents or guardians of color;

(5) procedures for coordinating the program with kindergarten through grade 12 curriculum, with parental involvement programs currently available in the community, with the world's best workforce under section 120B.11, and with other education facilities located in the community;

(6) strategies for training teachers and other school staff to work effectively with parents and guardians;

(7) procedures for parents or guardians and educators to evaluate and report progress toward program goals; and

(8) a mechanism for convening a local community advisory committee composed primarily of parents or guardians to advise a district on implementing a parental involvement program.

3. Plan activities. Activities contained in the model plans must include:

(1) educational opportunities for families that enhance children's learning and native and English language development;

(2) educational programs for parents or guardians on families' educational responsibilities and resources;

(3) the hiring, training, and use of parental involvement liaison workers to coordinate family involvement activities and to foster linguistic and culturally competent communication among families, educators, and students, consistent with the definition of culturally competent under section 120B.30, subdivision 1, paragraph (q);

(4) curriculum materials and assistance in implementing home and community-based learning activities that reinforce and extend classroom instruction and student motivation;

(5) technical assistance, including training to design and carry out family involvement programs;

(6) parent resource centers;

(7) parent training programs and reasonable and necessary expenditures associated with parents' attendance at training sessions;

(8) reports to parents on children's progress;

(9) use of parents as classroom volunteers, or as volunteers in before and after school programs for school-age children, tutors, and aides;

(10) soliciting parents' suggestions in planning, developing, and implementing school programs;

(11) educational programs and opportunities for parents or guardians that are multicultural, multilingual, gender fair, and disability sensitive;

(12) involvement in a district's curriculum advisory committee or a site team under section 120B.11; and

(13) opportunities for parent involvement in developing, implementing, or evaluating school and district desegregation/integration plans under sections 124D.861 and 124D.862.

124D.8955. Parent and family involvement policy.

(a) In order to promote and support student achievement, a local school board is encouraged to formally adopt and implement a parent and family involvement policy that promotes and supports:

(1) oral and written communication between home and school that is regular, two-way, meaningful, and in families' native language;

(2) parenting skills;

(3) parents and caregivers who play an integral role in assisting student learning and learn about fostering students' academic success and learning at home and school;

(4) welcoming parents in the school and using networks that support families' cultural connections, seeking their support and assistance;

(5) partnerships with parents in the decisions that affect children and families in the schools; and

(6) providing community resources to strengthen schools, families, and student learning, including establishing a safe and supportive school climate by developing and implementing prevention and intervention programs on prohibited conduct under section 121A.031.

(b) A school board that implements a parent and family involvement policy under paragraph (a) must convene an advisory committee composed of an equal number of resident parents who are not district employees and school staff to make recommendations to the board on developing and evaluating the board's parent and family involvement policy. If possible, the advisory committee must represent the diversity of the district. The advisory committee must consider the district's demographic diversity and barriers to parent involvement when developing its recommendations. The advisory committee must recommend to the school board and district or school how programs serving children and adolescents can collaborate on:

(1) understanding child and adolescent development;

(2) encouraging healthy communication between parents and children;

(3) managing students' behavior through positive reinforcement;

(4) establishing expectations for student behavior;

(5) providing media and Internet limits and supervision; and

(6) promoting resilience and reducing risks for children.

The advisory committee must present its recommendations to the board for board consideration.

(c) The board must consider research-based best practices when implementing this policy.

(d) The board periodically must review this policy to determine whether it is aligned with the most current research findings on parent involvement policies and practices and how effective the policy is in supporting increased student achievement.

(e) Nothing in this section obligates a school district to exceed any parent or family involvement requirement under federal law.

126C.44. Safe schools levy.

(a) Each district may make a levy on all taxable property located within the district for the purposes specified in this section. The maximum amount which may be levied for all costs under this section shall be equal to $36 multiplied by the district's adjusted pupil units for the school year. The proceeds of the levy must be reserved and used for directly funding the following purposes or for reimbursing the cities and counties who contract with the district for the following purposes:

(1) to pay the costs incurred for the salaries, benefits, and transportation costs of peace officers and sheriffs for liaison in services in the district's schools;

(2) to pay the costs for a drug abuse prevention program as defined in section 609.101, subdivision 3, paragraph (e), in the elementary schools;

(3) to pay the costs for a gang resistance education training curriculum in the district's schools;

(4) to pay the costs for security in the district's schools and on school property;

(5) to pay the costs for other crime prevention, drug abuse, student and staff safety, voluntary opt-in suicide prevention tools, and violence prevention measures taken by the school district;

(6) to pay costs for licensed school counselors, licensed school nurses, licensed school social workers, licensed school psychologists, and licensed alcohol and chemical dependency counselors to help provide early responses to problems;

(7) to pay for facility security enhancements including laminated glass, public announcement systems, emergency communications devices, and equipment and facility modifications related to violence prevention and facility security;

(8) to pay for costs associated with improving the school climate; or

(9) to pay costs for colocating and collaborating with mental health professionals who are not district employees or contractors.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Behavioral interventions and student support services
Statute

LAWS

121A.25. Chemical abuse preassessment teams; definitions.

1. Applicability. The definitions in this section apply to sections 121A.26 to 121A.29 and 121A.61, subdivision 3.

2. Controlled substances. "Controlled substances" means the term as defined in section 152.01, subdivision 4, and "marijuana" as defined in section 152.01, subdivision 9.

3. Chemical abuse. "Chemical abuse" means use of any psychoactive or mood-altering chemical substance, without compelling medical reason, in a manner that induces mental, emotional, or physical impairment and causes socially dysfunctional or socially disordering behavior, to the extent that the minor's normal functioning in academic, school, or social activities is chronically impaired.

4. Teachers. "Teachers" has the meaning given it in section 122A.15, subdivision 1.

121A.26. School preassessment teams.

Every public school, and every nonpublic school that participates in a school district chemical abuse program shall establish a chemical abuse preassessment team. The preassessment team must be composed of classroom teachers, administrators, and to the extent they exist in each school, school nurse, school counselor or psychologist, social worker, chemical abuse specialist, and other appropriate professional staff. The superintendents or their designees shall designate the team members in the public schools. The preassessment team is responsible for addressing reports of chemical abuse problems and making recommendations for appropriate responses to the individual reported cases.

Within 45 days after receiving an individual reported case, the preassessment team shall make a determination whether to provide the student and, in the case of a minor, the student's parents with information about school and community services in connection with chemical abuse. Data may be disclosed without consent in health and safety emergencies pursuant to section 13.32 and applicable federal law and regulations.

Notwithstanding section 138.163, destruction of records identifying individual students shall be governed by this section. If the preassessment team decides not to provide a student and, in the case of a minor, the student's parents with information about school or community services in connection with chemical abuse, records created or maintained by the preassessment team about the student shall be destroyed not later than six months after the determination is made. If the preassessment team decides to provide a student and, in the case of a minor, the student's parents with information about school or community services in connection with chemical abuse, records created or maintained by the preassessment team about the student shall be destroyed not later than six months after the student is no longer enrolled in the district.

121A.031. School student bullying policy.

4. Local policy components.

(a) Each district and school policy implemented under this section must, at a minimum:

(7) provide information about available community resources to the target, actor, and other affected individuals, as appropriate;

121A.45. Grounds for dismissal.

3. Parent notification and meeting. If a pupil's total days of removal from school exceeds ten cumulative days in a school year, the school district shall make reasonable attempts to convene a meeting with the pupil and the pupil's parent or guardian before subsequently removing the pupil from school and, with the permission of the parent or guardian, arrange for a mental health screening for the pupil. The district is not required to pay for the mental health screening. The purpose of this meeting is to attempt to determine the pupil's need for assessment or other services or whether the parent or guardian should have the pupil assessed or diagnosed to determine whether the pupil needs treatment for a mental health disorder.

121A.67. Removal by peace officer.

2. Removal by peace officer. If a pupil who has an individualized education program is restrained or removed from a classroom, school building, or school grounds by a peace officer at the request of a school administrator or a school staff person during the school day twice in a 30-day period, the pupil's individualized education program team must meet to determine if the pupil's individualized education program is adequate or if additional evaluation is needed.

122A.627. Positive behavioral interventions and supports.

"Positive behavioral interventions and supports" or "PBIS" means an evidence-based framework for preventing problem behavior, providing instruction and support for positive and prosocial behaviors, and supporting social, emotional, and behavioral needs for all students. Schoolwide implementation of PBIS requires training, coaching, and evaluation for school staff to consistently implement the key components that make PBIS effective for all students, including:

(1) establishing, defining, teaching, and practicing three to five positively stated schoolwide behavioral expectations that are representative of the local community and cultures;

(2) developing and implementing a consistent system used by all staff to provide positive feedback and acknowledgment for students who display schoolwide behavioral expectations;

(3) developing and implementing a consistent and specialized support system for students who do not display behaviors representative of schoolwide positive expectations;

(4) developing a system to support decisions based on data related to student progress, effective implementation of behavioral practices, and screening for students requiring additional behavior supports;

(5) using a continuum of evidence-based interventions that is integrated and aligned to support academic and behavioral success for all students; and

(6) using a team-based approach to support effective implementation, monitor progress, and evaluate outcome

Consistent with section 120B.232, subdivision 1, character education curriculum and programs may be used to support implementation of the key components of PBIS.

123B.41. Definitions.

4. Pupil support services. "Pupil support services" means guidance and counseling services and health services.

14. Guidance and counseling services. "Guidance and counseling services" means all activities of a licensed counselor in counseling pupils and parents, providing counseling on learning problems, evaluating the abilities of pupils, assisting pupils in personal and social development and providing referral assistance.

124D.68. Graduation incentives program.

1. Purpose. The legislature finds that it is critical to provide options for children to succeed in school. Therefore, the purpose of this section is to provide incentives for and encourage all Minnesota students who have experienced or are experiencing difficulty in the traditional education system to enroll in alternative programs.

2. Eligible pupils.

(a) A pupil under the age of 21 or who meets the requirements of section 120A.20, subdivision 1, paragraph (c), is eligible to participate in the graduation incentives program, if the pupil:

(1) performs substantially below the performance level for pupils of the same age in a locally determined achievement test;

(2) is behind in satisfactorily completing coursework or obtaining credits for graduation;

(3) is pregnant or is a parent;

(4) has been assessed as chemically dependent;

(5) has been excluded or expelled according to sections 121A.40 to 121A.56;

(6) has been referred by a school district for enrollment in an eligible program or a program pursuant to section 124D.69;

(7) is a victim of physical or sexual abuse;

(8) has experienced mental health problems;

(9) has experienced homelessness sometime within six months before requesting a transfer to an eligible program;

(10) speaks English as a second language or is an English learner; or

(11) has withdrawn from school or has been chronically truant; or

(12) is being treated in a hospital in the seven-county metropolitan area for cancer or other life threatening illness or is the sibling of an eligible pupil who is being currently treated, and resides with the pupil's family at least 60 miles beyond the outside boundary of the seven-county metropolitan area.

(b) For fiscal years 2017 and 2018 only, a pupil otherwise qualifying under paragraph (a) who is at least 21 years of age and not yet 22 years of age, is an English learner with an interrupted formal education according to section 124D.59, subdivision 2a, and was in an early middle college program during the previous school year is eligible to participate in the graduation incentives program under section 124D.68 and in concurrent enrollment courses offered under section 124D.09, subdivision 10, and is funded in the same manner as other pupils under this section.

3. Eligible programs.

(a) A pupil who is eligible according to subdivision 2 may enroll in a state-approved alternative program under sections 123A.05 to 123A.08.

(b) A pupil who is eligible according to subdivision 2 and who is a high school junior or senior may enroll in postsecondary courses under section 124D.09.

(c) A pupil who is eligible under subdivision 2, may enroll in any public elementary or secondary education program.

(d) A pupil who is eligible under subdivision 2, may enroll in any nonpublic, nonsectarian school that has contracted with the serving school district to provide educational services. However, notwithstanding other provisions of this section, only a pupil who is eligible under subdivision 2, clause (12), may enroll in a contract alternative school that is specifically structured to provide educational services to such a pupil.

(e) A pupil who is between the ages of 16 and 21 may enroll in any adult basic education programs approved under section 124D.52 and operated under the community education program contained in section 124D.19.

4. Additional eligible program. A pupil who is at least 16 years of age, who is eligible under subdivision 2, and who has been enrolled only in a public school, if the pupil has been enrolled in any school, during the year immediately before transferring under this subdivision, may transfer to any nonpublic school that has contracted with the serving school district to provide nonsectarian educational services. The school must enroll every eligible pupil who seeks to transfer to the school under this program subject to available space.

5. Pupil enrollment.

(a) Any eligible pupil may apply to enroll in an eligible program. Approval of the resident district is not required for:

(1) an eligible pupil to enroll in any eligible program in a nonresident district under subdivision 3 or 4 or a state-approved alternative program established under section 123A.05; o

(2) an eligible pupil under subdivision 2, to enroll in an adult basic education program approved under section 124D.52.

(b) Notwithstanding paragraph (a), a nonresident district must first approve the enrollment application of any eligible pupil who was expelled under section 121A.45 for a reason stated in section 124D.03, subdivision 1, paragraph (b).

6. Dissemination of information. A district must disseminate information, developed by the department, about the graduation incentives program to residents in the district who are under the age of 21.

7. Desegregation plans. Notwithstanding any provision to the contrary, students may not enroll in a nonresident district under this section if their enrollment in another district would result in a violation of a district's desegregation plan, as mandated and approved by the commissioner of education.

8. Aid adjustments. General education aid and transportation aid attributable to a pupil covered by programs under this section must be paid according to sections 127A.47, subdivision 7, and 123B.92, subdivision 3, respectively.

9. Enrollment verification.

(a) For a pupil attending an eligible program full time under subdivision 3, paragraph (d), the department must pay 90 percent of the district's average general education revenue less basic skills revenue to the eligible program and ten percent of the district's average general education revenue less basic skills revenue to the contracting district within 30 days after the eligible program verifies enrollment using the form provided by the department. For a pupil attending an eligible program part time, revenue, excluding compensatory revenue, shall be reduced proportionately, according to the amount of time the pupil attends the program, and the payments to the eligible program and the contracting district shall be reduced accordingly. A pupil for whom payment is made according to this section may not be counted by any district for any purpose other than computation of general education revenue. If payment is made for a pupil under this subdivision, a district shall not reimburse a program under section 124D.69 for the same pupil. The basic skills revenue generated by pupils attending the eligible program according to section 126C.10, subdivision 4, shall be paid to the eligible program.

(b) The department must pay up to 100 percent of the revenue to the eligible program if there is an agreement to that effect between the school district and the eligible program.

(c) Notwithstanding paragraphs (a) and (b), for an eligible program that provides chemical treatment services to students, the department must pay 100 percent of the revenue to the eligible program.

10. Severability. If for any reason any portion of this section is found by a court to be unconstitutional, the remaining portions of the section shall remain in effect.

125A.0941. Definitions.

(d) "Positive behavioral interventions and supports" means interventions and strategies to improve the school environment and teach children the skills to behave appropriately, including the key components under section 122A.627.

125A.0942. Standards for restrictive procedures.

6. Behavior supports; reasonable force.

(a) School districts are encouraged to establish effective schoolwide systems of positive behavior interventions and supports.

(b) Nothing in this section or section 125A.0941 precludes the use of reasonable force under sections 121A.582; 609.06, subdivision 1; and 609.379. For the 2014-2015 school year and later, districts must collect and submit to the commissioner summary data, consistent with subdivision 3, paragraph (b), on district use of reasonable force that is consistent with the definition of physical holding or seclusion for a child with a disability under this section.

260A.01. Truancy programs and services.

(a) The programs in this chapter are designed to provide a continuum of intervention and services to support families and children in keeping children in school and combating truancy and educational neglect. School districts, county attorneys, and law enforcement may establish the programs and coordinate them with other community-based truancy services in order to provide the necessary and most effective intervention for children and their families. This continuum of intervention and services involves progressively intrusive intervention, beginning with strong service-oriented efforts at the school and community level and involving the court's authority only when necessary.

(b) Consistent with section 125A.091, subdivision 5, a parent's refusal to provide the parent's child with sympathomimetic medications does not constitute educational neglect.

126C.44. Safe schools levy.

(a) Each district may make a levy on all taxable property located within the district for the purposes specified in this section. The maximum amount which may be levied for all costs under this section shall be equal to $36 multiplied by the district's adjusted pupil units for the school year. The proceeds of the levy must be reserved and used for directly funding the following purposes or for reimbursing the cities and counties who contract with the district for the following purposes:

(1) to pay the costs incurred for the salaries, benefits, and transportation costs of peace officers and sheriffs for liaison in services in the district's schools;

(2) to pay the costs for a drug abuse prevention program as defined in section 609.101, subdivision 3, paragraph (e), in the elementary schools;

(3) to pay the costs for a gang resistance education training curriculum in the district's schools;

(4) to pay the costs for security in the district's schools and on school property;

(5) to pay the costs for other crime prevention, drug abuse, student and staff safety, voluntary opt-in suicide prevention tools, and violence prevention measures taken by the school district;

(6) to pay costs for licensed school counselors, licensed school nurses, licensed school social workers, licensed school psychologists, and licensed alcohol and chemical dependency counselors to help provide early responses to problems;

(7) to pay for facility security enhancements including laminated glass, public announcement systems, emergency communications devices, and equipment and facility modifications related to violence prevention and facility security;

(8) to pay for costs associated with improving the school climate; or

(9) to pay costs for colocating and collaborating with mental health professionals who are not district employees or contractors.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Professional development
Statute

LAWS

120B.22. Violence prevention education.

2. In-service training. Each district is encouraged to provide training for district staff and school board members on the following:

(1) helping students identify violence in the family and the community so that students may learn to resolve conflicts in effective, nonviolent ways

(2) responding to a disclosure of child sexual abuse in a supportive, appropriate manner; and

(3) complying with mandatory reporting requirements under section 626.556

The in-service training must be ongoing and involve experts familiar with sexual abuse, domestic violence, and personal safety issues.

3. Funding sources. Districts may accept funds from public and private sources for violence prevention programs developed and implemented under this section.

121A.031. School student bullying policy.

4. Local policy components.

(a) Each district and school policy implemented under this section must, at a minimum:

(9) use new employee training materials, the school publication on school rules, procedures, and standards of conduct, and the student handbook on school policies to publicize the policy;

(10) require ongoing professional development, consistent with section 122A.60, to build the skills of all school personnel who regularly interact with students, including but not limited to educators, administrators, school counselors, social workers, psychologists, other school mental health professionals, school nurses, cafeteria workers, custodians, bus drivers, athletic coaches, extracurricular activities advisors, and paraprofessionals to identify, prevent, and appropriately address prohibited conduct;

(b) Professional development under a local policy includes, but is not limited to, information about:

(1) developmentally appropriate strategies both to prevent and to immediately and effectively intervene to stop prohibited conduct;

(2) the complex dynamics affecting an actor, target, and witnesses to prohibited conduct;

(3) research on prohibited conduct, including specific categories of students at risk for prohibited conduct in school;

(4) the incidence and nature of cyberbullying; and

(5) Internet safety and cyberbullying.

122A.60. Staff development program.

1. Staff development committee.

(a) A school board must use the revenue authorized in section 122A.61 for

(1) teacher development and evaluation plans under this section 122A.40, subdivision 8, or 122A.41, subdivision 5;

(2) principal development and evaluation under section 123B.147, subdivision 3;

(3) in-service education programs under section 120B.22, subdivision 2; and

(4) other staff development needs.

(b) The board must establish an advisory staff development committee to develop the plan, assist site professional development teams in developing a site plan consistent with the goals of the plan, and evaluate staff development efforts at the site level. A majority of the advisory committee and the site professional development team must be teachers representing various grade levels, subject areas, and special education. The advisory committee must also include nonteaching staff, parents, and administrators

1a. Effective staff development activities.

(a) Staff development activities must:

(1) focus on the school classroom and research-based strategies that improve student learning;

(2) provide opportunities for teachers to practice and improve their instructional skills over time;

(3) provide opportunities for teachers to use student data as part of their daily work to increase student achievement;

(4) enhance teacher content knowledge and instructional skills, including to accommodate the delivery of digital and blended learning and curriculum and engage students with technology;

(5) align with state and local academic standards;

(6) provide opportunities to build professional relationships, foster collaboration among principals and staff who provide instruction, and provide opportunities for teacher-to-teacher mentoring;

(7) align with the plan of the district or site for an alternative teacher professional pay system;

(8) provide teachers of English learners, including English as a second language and content teachers, with differentiated instructional strategies critical for ensuring students' long-term academic success; the means to effectively use assessment data on the academic literacy, oral academic language, and English language development of English learners; and skills to support native and English language development across the curriculum; and

(9) provide opportunities for staff to learn about current workforce trends, the connections between workforce trends and postsecondary education, and training options, including career and technical education options.

Staff development activities may include curriculum development and curriculum training programs, and activities that provide teachers and other members of site-based teams training to enhance team performance. The school district also may implement other staff development activities required by law and activities associated with professional teacher compensation models.

(b) Release time provided for teachers to supervise students on field trips and school activities, or independent tasks not associated with enhancing the teacher's knowledge and instructional skills, such as preparing report cards, calculating grades, or organizing classroom materials, may not be counted as staff development time that is financed with staff development reserved revenue under section 122A.61.

2. Contents of plan. The plan must include the staff development outcomes under section 122A.40, subdivision 8, or 122A.41, subdivision 5, and section 123B.147, subdivision 3, the means to achieve the outcomes, and procedures for evaluating progress at each school site toward meeting education and staff development outcomes, consistent with relicensure requirements under section 122A.18, subdivision 4. The plan also must:

(1) support stable and productive professional communities achieved through ongoing and schoolwide progress and growth in teaching practice;

(2) emphasize coaching, professional learning communities, classroom action research, and other job-embedded models;

(3) maintain a strong subject matter focus premised on students' learning goals, consistent with section 120B.125;

(4) ensure specialized preparation and learning about issues related to teaching English learners and students with special needs by focusing on long-term systemic efforts to improve educational services and opportunities and raise student achievement; and

(5) reinforce national and state standards of effective teaching practice.

3. Staff development outcomes. The advisory staff development committee must adopt a staff development plan, consistent with section 122A.40, subdivision 8, or 122A.41, subdivision 5, for developing and evaluating teachers and for improving student achievement outcomes and with section 123B.147, subdivision 3, for strengthening principals' capacity in areas of instruction, supervision, evaluation, and teacher development. The plan must be consistent with education outcomes that the school board determines. The plan must include ongoing staff development activities that contribute toward continuous improvement in achievement of achieving the following goals:

(1) improve student achievement of state and local education standards in all areas of the curriculum, including areas of regular academic and applied and experiential learning, by using research-based best practices methods;

(2) effectively meet the needs of a diverse student population, including at-risk children, children with disabilities, English learners, and gifted children, within the regular classroom, applied and experiential learning settings, and other settings;

(3) provide an inclusive curriculum for a racially, ethnically, linguistically, and culturally diverse student population that is consistent with the state education diversity rule and the district's education diversity plan;

(4) improve staff collaboration and develop mentoring and peer coaching programs for teachers new to the school or district;

(5) effectively teach and model violence prevention policy and curriculum that address early intervention alternatives, issues of harassment, and teach nonviolent alternatives for conflict resolution;

(6) effectively deliver digital and blended learning and curriculum and engage students with technology; and

(7) provide teachers and other members of site-based management teams with appropriate management and financial management skills.

4. Staff development report.

(a) The district and site staff development committees shall write a report of staff development activities and expenditures for the previous year. The report, signed by the district superintendent and staff development chair, must include assessment and evaluation data indicating progress toward district and site staff development goals based on teaching and learning outcomes, including the percentage of teachers and other staff involved in instruction who participate in effective staff development activities under subdivision 3 as part of the district's world's best workforce report under section 120B.11, subdivision 5.

(b) The report must break down expenditures for:

(1) curriculum development and curriculum training programs; and

(2) staff development training models, workshops, and conferences, and the cost of releasing teachers or providing substitute teachers for staff development purposes.

The report also must indicate whether the expenditures were incurred at the district level or the school site level, and whether the school site expenditures were made possible by grants to school sites that demonstrate exemplary use of allocated staff development revenue. These expenditures must be reported using the uniform financial and accounting and reporting standards.

122A.66. Teacher training; effects of drugs and alcohol

All educational institutions providing teacher education must offer a program in the personal use and misuse of and dependency on tobacco, alcohol, drugs and other chemicals. Every student attending educational institutions in preparation for teaching service shall be required to take and to satisfactorily complete a program under this section.

125A.0942. Standards for restrictive procedures.

5. Training for staff.

(a) To meet the requirements of subdivision 1, staff who use restrictive procedures, including paraprofessionals, shall complete training in the following skills and knowledge areas:

(1) positive behavioral interventions;

(2) communicative intent of behaviors;

(3) relationship building;

(4) alternatives to restrictive procedures, including techniques to identify events and environmental factors that may escalate behavior;

(5) de-escalation methods;

(6) standards for using restrictive procedures only in an emergency;

(7) obtaining emergency medical assistance;

(8) the physiological and psychological impact of physical holding and seclusion;

(9) monitoring and responding to a child's physical signs of distress when physical holding is being used;

(10) recognizing the symptoms of and interventions that may cause positional asphyxia when physical holding is used;

(11) district policies and procedures for timely reporting and documenting each incident involving use of a restricted procedure; and

(12) schoolwide programs on positive behavior strategies.

(b) The commissioner, after consulting with the commissioner of human services, must develop and maintain a list of training programs that satisfy the requirements of paragraph (a). The commissioner also must develop and maintain a list of experts to help individualized education program teams reduce the use of restrictive procedures. The district shall maintain records of staff who have been trained and the organization or professional that conducted the training. The district may collaborate with children's community mental health providers to coordinate trainings.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Major Category
Monitoring and Accountability
Sub Category
Formal incident reporting of conduct violations
Statute

LAWS

121A.03. Model policy.

2. Sexual, religious, and racial harassment and violence policy. A school board must adopt a written sexual, religious, and racial harassment and sexual, religious, and racial violence policy that conforms with chapter 363A. The policy shall apply to pupils, teachers, administrators, and other school personnel, include reporting procedures, and set forth disciplinary actions that will be taken for violation of the policy. [...]

121A.031. School student bullying policy.

4. Local policy components.

(a) Each district and school policy implemented under this section must, at a minimum:

(1) designate a staff member as the primary contact person in the school building to receive reports of prohibited conduct under clause (3), ensure the policy and its procedures including restorative practices, consequences, and sanctions are fairly and fully implemented, and serve as the primary contact on policy and procedural matters implicating both the district or school and the department;

(2) require school employees who witness prohibited conduct or possess reliable information that would lead a reasonable person to suspect that a student is a target of prohibited conduct to make reasonable efforts to address and resolve the prohibited conduct;

(3) provide a procedure to begin to investigate reports of prohibited conduct within three school days of the report, and make the primary contact person responsible for the investigation and any resulting record and for keeping and regulating access to any record;

(4) indicate how a school will respond to an identified incident of prohibited conduct, including immediately intervening to protect the target of the prohibited conduct; at the school administrator's discretion and consistent with state and federal data practices law governing access to data, including section 13.02, subdivision 8, a presumption that a district or school official will notify the parent of the reported target of the prohibited conduct and the parent of the actor engaged in the prohibited conduct; providing other remedial responses to the prohibited conduct; and ensuring that remedial responses are tailored to the particular incident and nature of the conduct and the student's developmental age and behavioral history;

(5) prohibit reprisals or retaliation against any person who asserts, alleges, or reports prohibited conduct or provides information about such conduct and establish appropriate consequences for a person who engages in reprisal or retaliation;

(6) allow anonymous reporting but do not rely solely on an anonymous report to determine discipline;

(7) provide information about available community resources to the target, actor, and other affected individuals, as appropriate;

(8) where appropriate for a child with a disability to prevent or respond to prohibited conduct, allow the child's individualized education program or section 504 plan to address the skills and proficiencies the child needs to respond to or not engage in prohibited conduct;

121A.69. Hazing policy.

3. School board policy. Each school board shall adopt a written policy governing student or staff hazing. The policy must apply to student behavior that occurs on or off school property and during and after school hours and be consistent with section 121A.031. The policy must include reporting procedures and disciplinary consequences for violating the policy. Disciplinary consequences must be sufficiently severe to deter violations and appropriately discipline prohibited behavior. Disciplinary consequences must conform with sections 121A.031 and 121A.41. to 121A.56. Each school must include the policy in the student handbook on school policies.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Parental notification
Statute

LAWS

120A.26. Enforcement and prosecution.

3. Notice to parents. The superintendent must notify the parent, in writing, if a child is alleged to be receiving instruction in violation of sections 120A.22 and 120A.24. The written notification must include a list of the specific alleged violations.

121A.45. Grounds for dismissal.

3. Parent notification and meeting. If a pupil's total days of removal from school exceeds ten cumulative days in a school year, the school district shall make reasonable attempts to convene a meeting with the pupil and the pupil's parent or guardian before subsequently removing the pupil from school and, with the permission of the parent or guardian, arrange for a mental health screening for the pupil. The district is not required to pay for the mental health screening. The purpose of this meeting is to attempt to determine the pupil's need for assessment or other services or whether the parent or guardian should have the pupil assessed or diagnosed to determine whether the pupil needs treatment for a mental health disorder.

121A.46. Suspension procedures.

3. Written notice of grounds for suspension. A written notice containing the grounds for suspension, a brief statement of the facts, a description of the testimony, a readmission plan, and a copy of sections 121A.40. to 121A.56, shall be personally served upon the pupil at or before the time the suspension is to take effect, and upon the pupil's parent or guardian by mail within 48 hours of the conference. The district shall make reasonable efforts to notify the parents of the suspension by telephone as soon as possible following suspension. In the event a pupil is suspended without an informal administrative conference on the grounds that the pupil will create an immediate and substantial danger to surrounding persons or property, the written notice shall be served upon the pupil and the pupil's parent or guardian within 48 hours of the suspension. Service by mail is complete upon mailing.

121A.47. Exclusion and expulsion procedures.

1. Requiring a hearing; pupil may waive hearing. No exclusion or expulsion shall be imposed without a hearing, unless the right to a hearing is waived in writing by the pupil and parent or guardian. The action shall be initiated by the school board or its agent.

2. Written notice. Written notice of intent to take action shall:

(a) be served upon the pupil and the pupil's parent or guardian personally or by mail;

(b) contain a complete statement of the facts, a list of the witnesses and a description of their testimony;

(c) state the date, time, and place of the hearing;

(d) be accompanied by a copy of sections 121A.40. to 121A.56;

(e) describe alternative educational services accorded the pupil in an attempt to avoid the expulsion proceedings; and

(f) inform the pupil and parent or guardian of the right to:

(1) have a representative of the pupil's own choosing, including legal counsel, at the hearing. The district shall advise the pupil's parent or guardian that free or low-cost legal assistance may be available and that a legal assistance resource list is available from the Department of Education;

(2) examine the pupil's records before the hearing;

(3) present evidence; and

(4) confront and cross-examine witnesses.

121A.54. Notice of right to be reinstated.

Whenever a pupil fails to return to school within ten school days of the termination of dismissal, a school administrator shall inform the pupil and the pupil's parents by mail of the pupil's right to attend and to be reinstated in the public school.

121A.61. Discipline and removal of students from class.

2. Grounds for removal from class. The policy must establish the various grounds for which a student may be removed from a class in the district for a period of time under the procedures specified in the policy. The policy must include a procedure for notifying and meeting with a student's parent or guardian to discuss the problem that is causing the student to be removed from class after the student has been removed from class more than ten times in one school year...

3. Policy components. The policy must include at least the following components:

(h) the procedures for notifying a student and the student's parents or guardian of violations of the rules of conduct and of resulting disciplinary actions;

(i) any procedures determined appropriate for encouraging early involvement of parents or guardians in attempts to improve a student's behavior;

125A.0942. Standards for restrictive procedures.

2. Restrictive procedures.

(b) A school shall make reasonable efforts to notify the parent on the same day a restrictive procedure is used on the child, or if the school is unable to provide same-day notice, notice is sent within two days by written or electronic means or as otherwise indicated by the child's parent under paragraph (f).

260A.02. Definitions.

3. Continuing truant. "Continuing truant" means a child who is subject to the compulsory instruction requirements of section 120A.22 and is absent from instruction in a school, as defined in section 120A.05, without valid excuse within a single school year for:

(1) three days if the child is in elementary school; or

(2) three or more class periods on three days if the child is in middle school, junior high school, or high school.

Nothing in this section shall prevent a school district or charter school from notifying a truant child's parent or legal guardian of the child's truancy or otherwise addressing a child's attendance problems prior to the child becoming a continuing truant.

260A.03. Notice to parent or guardian when child is a continuing truant.

Upon a child's initial classification as a continuing truant, the school attendance officer or other designated school official shall notify the child's parent or legal guardian, by first-class mail or other reasonable means, of the following:

(1) that the child is truant;

(2) that the parent or guardian should notify the school if there is a valid excuse for the child's absences;

(3) that the parent or guardian is obligated to compel the attendance of the child at school pursuant to section 120A.22 and parents or guardians who fail to meet this obligation may be subject to prosecution under section 120A.34;

(4) that this notification serves as the notification required by section 120A.34;

(5) that alternative educational programs and services may be available in the child's enrolling or resident district;

(6) that the parent or guardian has the right to meet with appropriate school personnel to discuss solutions to the child's truancy;

(7) that if the child continues to be truant, the parent and child may be subject to juvenile court proceedings under chapter 260C;

(8) that if the child is subject to juvenile court proceedings, the child may be subject to suspension, restriction, or delay of the child's driving privilege pursuant to section 260C.201; and

(9) that it is recommended that the parent or guardian accompany the child to school and attend classes with the child for one day.

260A.04. Community-based truancy projects and service centers

3. Truancy service centers.

(a) Truancy service centers may be established as facilities to receive truant students from peace officers and probation officers and provide other appropriate services. A truancy service center may:

(3) contact the parents or legal guardian of the truant student and release the truant student to the custody of the parents, guardian, or other suitable person;

260A.06. Referral of truant students to school attendance review board.

1. Referral; notice.

An attendance officer or other school official may refer a student who is a continuing truant to the school attendance review board. The person making the referral shall provide a written notice by first class mail or other reasonable means to the student and the student's parent or legal guardian. The notice must:

(1) include the name and address of the board to which the student has been referred and the reason for the referral; and

(2) indicate that the student, the parent or legal guardian, and the referring person will meet with the board to determine a proper disposition of the referral, unless the board refers the student directly to the county attorney or for other appropriate legal action.

260A.07. County attorney truancy mediation program.

1. Establishment; referrals. A county attorney may establish a truancy mediation program for the purpose of resolving truancy problems without court action. If a student is in a school district or charter school that has established a school attendance review board, the student may be referred to the county attorney under section 260A.06, subdivision 3. If the student's school district or charter school has not established a board, the student may be referred to the county attorney by the school district or charter school if the student continues to be truant after the parent or guardian has been sent or conveyed the notice under section 260A.03.

2. Meeting; notice. The county attorney may request the parent or legal guardian and the child referred under subdivision 1 to attend a meeting to discuss the possible legal consequences of the minor's truancy. The notice of the meeting must be served personally or by certified mail at least five days before the meeting on each person required to attend the meeting. The notice must include:

(1) the name and address of the person to whom the notice is directed;

(2) the date, time, and place of the meeting;

(3) the name of the minor classified as a truant;

(4) the basis for the referral to the county attorney;

(5) a warning that a criminal complaint may be filed against the parents or guardians pursuant to section 120A.34 for failure to compel the attendance of the minor at school or that action may be taken in juvenile court; and

(6) a statement that the meeting is voluntary.

124D.8957. Prekindergarten through grade 12 parental rights coded elsewhere.

1. Scope. The sections referred to in subdivisions 2 to 30 are codified outside this section. Those sections include many but not all the sections governing parental rights related to topics in prekindergarten through grade 12 education.

2. Compulsory instruction. Parental rights related to compulsory instruction, including the right to withdraw a child from school; to receive notice related to transfer of disciplinary records; to excuse a child from school for illnesses, appointments, or religious events; and the right of noncustodial parents to access school records and conferences, among other rights, are governed by section 120A.22.

3. Longitudinal data. The parental right to annual summary longitudinal performance and progress data is governed by section 120B.31.

4. Antibullying. Parental rights related to school district antibullying policies, including the right to be involved in developing the policies, the right to be notified of incidents of prohibited conduct, and the right to be informed of data practices laws, are governed by section 121A.031.

5. Student discipline policies. The parental right to notice in student discipline policies of rights under the Safe and Supportive Minnesota Schools Act is governed by section 121A.0311.

6. Early childhood development screening. Parental rights to certain notice requirements related to early childhood development screening and to receive results of early childhood development screening are governed by section 121A.17. The parental right to provide consent before individual screening data may be disclosed to a school district is governed by section 121A.18.

7. Chemical abuse. The parental right to be informed of a reported case of chemical abuse by a minor student is governed by section 121A.26.

8. Pesticides. The parental right to be notified regarding the use of pesticides at a school is governed by the Janet B. Johnson Parents' Right-to-Know Act under section 121A.30.

9. Student dismissal. The parental right to notice and a meeting regarding the removal of a student for more than ten days is governed by section 121A.45.

10. Exclusion and expulsion. The parental right to be included in exclusion or expulsion hearing procedures, including access to records, ability to testify and present evidence, and inclusion in the student's readmission plan, is governed by section 121A.47.

11. Exclusion and expulsion appeal. The parental right to notice of the right to appeal an exclusion or expulsion decision is governed by section 121A.49.

12. Reinstatement after termination of dismissal. The parental right to notice of a student's right to be reinstated after the termination of dismissal is governed by section 121A.54.

13. Interdistrict cooperation. The parental right to notice of an informational school board meeting relating to discontinuing interdistrict cooperation is governed by section 123A.32.

14. Background checks. The parental right to notice of a school's background check policy for hiring teachers is governed by section 123B.03.

15. Textbook fees. The parental right to notice of a school board's policy to charge fees for textbooks lost or destroyed by students is governed by section 123B.37.

16. Transportation privileges. The parental right to surrender a student's privilege to receive transportation services from a school district is governed by section 123B.88.

17. Nonresident district policies. The parental right to receive notice of: a decision on an application by a student to attend school in a nonresident district; the transportation policies of the nonresident district; and the right to be reimbursed for costs of transportation to the nonresident district's border is governed by section 124D.03.

18. Out-of-state districts. Under section 124D.04, the parental rights related to a student attending a nonresident district under section 124D.03 apply to a student attending an out-of-state district.

19. Free or reduced-price lunch eligibility. The parental right to opt a child out of disclosing a child's eligibility for free or reduced-price lunch to the Department of Education and the Department of Human Services is governed by section 124D.1115.

20. Learning year programs. The parental right to notice of optional learning year programs is governed by section 124D.128.

21. English learners programs. Parental rights related to student enrollment in programs for English learners, including notice, withdrawal, and parental involvement, are governed by section 124D.60.

22. Charter school transportation. The parental right to receive pupil transportation information from the charter school or school district providing transportation services to a charter school student is governed by section 123B.88.

23. Services for children with disabilities. The parental right to be included in determining the appropriate and necessary services for students with disabilities is governed by section 125A.027.

24. Data on children with disabilities. The parental right to notice and involvement regarding online reporting of data related to children with disabilities is governed by section 125A.085.

25. Special education alternative dispute resolution. Parental rights regarding notice, participation, and due process related to special education alternative dispute resolution procedures are governed by section 125A.091.

26. Third-party reimbursement for children with disabilities. The parental right to notice of a school district seeking reimbursement from medical assistance or MinnesotaCare for services rendered to a student with a disability is governed by section 125A.21.

27. Services provided to children with disabilities. Parental rights related to services provided to students eligible for Part C services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the right to receive written materials regarding the implementation of Part C services are governed by sections 125A.42 and 125A.48. The parental right to use mediation to resolve disputes under section 125A.42 is governed by section 125A.43.

28. Minnesota State Academies discharge. The parental right to notice of a student's discharge from the Minnesota State Academies is governed by section 125A.68.

29. Education records for military children. The parental right to education records under the Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children is governed by section 127A.85.

30. Appeal adverse school board decision. The parental right to appeal a school board decision adversely affecting an academic program of an enrolled student is governed by section 129C.10, subdivision 3b.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Reporting and referrals between schools and law enforcement
Statute

LAWS

120A.26. Enforcement and prosecution.

5. Notice to county attorney. If the alleged violations are not corrected through the fact-finding and mediation process under subdivision 4, the superintendent must notify the county attorney of the alleged violations. The superintendent must notify the parents, by certified mail, of the superintendent's intent to notify the county attorney of the alleged violations.

6. Criminal complaint; prosecution. The county attorney in the county in which the alleged violations have occurred has jurisdiction to conduct a prosecution for violations of this section, section 120A.22, or section 120A.24. A criminal complaint may be filed in any court in the county exercising criminal jurisdiction and must name the persons neglecting or refusing to comply with this section, section 120A.22, or section 120A.24. After the complaint has been filed, a warrant must be issued and proceedings in trial must commence as provided by law in misdemeanor cases.

120A.32. Officers, teachers; Neglect of duty, penalty.

Any school officer, truant officer, public or nonpublic school teacher, principal, district superintendent, or person providing instruction other than a parent refusing, willfully failing, or neglecting to perform any duty imposed by sections 120A.22, 120A.26, 120A.35, 120A.41, and 123B.03 is guilty of a misdemeanor. All persons found guilty shall be punished for each offense by a fine of not more than $10 or by imprisonment for not more than ten days. All fines, when collected, shall be paid into the county treasury for the benefit of the school district in which the offense is committed.

120A.34. Violations; Penalties.

Any person who fails or refuses to provide for instruction of a child of whom the person has legal custody, and who is required by section 120A.22, subdivision 5, to receive instruction, when notified so to do by a truant officer or other official, or any person who induces or attempts to induce any child unlawfully to be absent from school, or who knowingly harbors or employs, while school is in session, any child unlawfully absent from school, shall be guilty of a petty misdemeanor. Any fines collected shall be paid into the county treasury for the benefit of the school district in which the offense is committed.'

121A.05. Policy to refer firearms possessor.

A school board must have a policy requiring the appropriate school official to, as soon as practicable, refer to the criminal justice or juvenile delinquency system, as appropriate, a pupil who brings a firearm to school unlawfully.

121A.28. Law enforcement records.

A law enforcement agency shall provide notice of any drug incident occurring within the agency's jurisdiction, in which the agency has probable cause to believe a student violated section 152.021, 152.022, 152.023, 152.024, 152.025, 152.0262, 152.027, 152.092, 152.097, or 340A.503, subdivision 1, 2, or 3. The notice shall be in writing and shall be provided, within two weeks after an incident occurs, to the chemical abuse preassessment team in the school where the student is enrolled.

121A.29. Reporting; chemical abuse.

1. Teacher's duty. A teacher in a nonpublic school participating in a school district chemical use program, or a public school teacher, who knows or has reason to believe that a student is using, possessing, or transferring alcohol or a controlled substance while on the school premises or involved in school-related activities, shall immediately notify the school's chemical abuse preassessment team of this information. A teacher who complies with this section shall be defended and indemnified under section 466.07, subdivision 1, in any action for damages arising out of the compliance.

2. Other reports. Nothing in this section prevents a teacher or any other school employee from reporting to a law enforcement agency any violation of law occurring on school premises or at school sponsored events.

121A.75. Receipt of records; sharing.

3. Peace officer records of children.

(a) A law enforcement agency must transmit the notice required by section 260B.171, subdivision 5, to the superintendent of the student's school district who must immediately transmit the notice to the principal of the school the student attends, or to the principal of the school the student attends if there is no superintendent. The principal must place the notice in the student's educational record. The principal must immediately notify any teacher, counselor, or administrator directly supervising the student who the principal believes needs the data to work with the student in an appropriate manner, to avoid being needlessly vulnerable, or to protect other persons from needless vulnerability. The principal may also notify other district employees, substitutes, or volunteers who are in direct contact with the student if the principal determines these individuals need the data to work with the juvenile in an appropriate manner, to avoid being needlessly vulnerable, or to protect other persons from needless vulnerability. When provided in the peace officer notice, the notice from the principal must identify the student and describe the alleged offense.

(b) Data received under this subdivision are private data on individuals under section 13.32 and are received for the limited purpose of serving the student's educational needs and protecting students or staff. The teacher, counselor, staff member, administrator, substitute, or volunteer must not further disseminate the data, except to communicate with the student or the student's parent or guardian as needed to serve the student, protect students or staff, or as otherwise required by law.

(c) The principal must include the notice in the student's educational record as required by section 120A.22, subdivision 7.

(d) If the county attorney determines not to proceed with a petition alleging any offense in section 260B.171, subdivision 3, paragraph (a), clauses (1) to (3), or directs the student into a diversion or mediation program, the county attorney must notify the superintendent of the student's school district who must immediately transmit the notice to the principal of the school the student attends, or to the principal of the school that the student attends if there is no superintendent. The notice must contain the name of the student and a summary of the resolution of the case. Notwithstanding section 138.17, the principal must delete the peace officer's report and notice from the student's educational record and destroy the data and make reasonable efforts to notify any teacher, counselor, staff member, administrator, substitute, or volunteer who received data from the peace officer notice.

(e) If the juvenile court makes a decision on a petition that alleges any offense in section 260B.171, subdivision 3, paragraph (a), clauses (1) to (3), and the decision affects a student and is not a disposition order, the court must notify the superintendent of the student's school district who must immediately transmit the notice to the principal of the school the student attends, or to the principal of the school that the student attends if there is no superintendent, of the decision. Notwithstanding section 138.17, the principal must delete the peace officer's report and notice from the student's educational record and destroy the data and make reasonable efforts to notify any teacher, counselor, staff member, administrator, substitute, or volunteer who received data from the peace officer notice.

(f) In addition to the data destruction requirements of this subdivision, a principal must comply with the requirements of section 120A.22, subdivision 7.

260A.06. Referral of truant students to school attendance review board.

3. Referral to county attorney; other appropriate action.

If the school attendance review board determines that available community services cannot resolve the attendance problems of the truant student, if the student or the parent or guardian has failed to comply with any referrals or agreements under subdivision 2 or to otherwise cooperate with the board, or if the board determines that a student should be referred directly under this subdivision, the board may:

(1) refer the matter to the county attorney under section 260A.07, if the county attorney has elected to participate in the truancy mediation program; or

(2) if the county attorney has not elected to participate in the truancy mediation program, refer the matter for appropriate legal action against the child or the child's parent or guardian under chapter 260 or section 120A.34.

260A.07. County attorney truancy mediation program.

1. Establishment; referrals. A county attorney may establish a truancy mediation program for the purpose of resolving truancy problems without court action. If a student is in a school district or charter school that has established a school attendance review board, the student may be referred to the county attorney under section 260A.06, subdivision 3. If the student's school district or charter school has not established a board, the student may be referred to the county attorney by the school district or charter school if the student continues to be truant after the parent or guardian has been sent or conveyed the notice under section 260A.03.

2. Meeting; notice. The county attorney may request the parent or legal guardian and the child referred under subdivision 1 to attend a meeting to discuss the possible legal consequences of the minor's truancy. The notice of the meeting must be served personally or by certified mail at least five days before the meeting on each person required to attend the meeting. The notice must include:

(1) the name and address of the person to whom the notice is directed;

(2) the date, time, and place of the meeting;

(3) the name of the minor classified as a truant;

(4) the basis for the referral to the county attorney;

(5) a warning that a criminal complaint may be filed against the parents or guardians pursuant to section 120A.34 for failure to compel the attendance of the minor at school or that action may be taken in juvenile court; and

(6) a statement that the meeting is voluntary.

609.66. Dangerous weapons.

1d. Possession on school property; penalty.

(a) Except as provided under paragraphs (d) and (f), whoever possesses, stores, or keeps a dangerous weapon while knowingly on school property is guilty of a felony and may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than five years or to payment of a fine of not more than $10,000, or both.

(b) Whoever uses or brandishes a replica firearm or a BB gun while knowingly on school property is guilty of a gross misdemeanor.

(c) Whoever possesses, stores, or keeps a replica firearm or a BB gun while knowingly on school property is guilty of a misdemeanor.

(d) Notwithstanding paragraph (a), (b), or (c), it is a misdemeanor for a person authorized to carry a firearm under the provisions of a permit or otherwise to carry a firearm on or about the person's clothes or person in a location the person knows is school property. Notwithstanding section 609.531, a firearm carried in violation of this paragraph is not subject to forfeiture.

(e) As used in this subdivision:

(1) "BB gun" means a device that fires or ejects a shot measuring .18 of an inch or less in diameter;

(2) "dangerous weapon" has the meaning given it in section 609.02, subdivision 6;

(3) "replica firearm" has the meaning given it in section 609.713; and

(4) "school property" means:

(i) a public or private elementary, middle, or secondary school building and its improved grounds, whether leased or owned by the school;

(ii) a child care center licensed under chapter 245A during the period children are present and participating in a child care program;

(iii) the area within a school bus when that bus is being used by a school to transport one or more elementary, middle, or secondary school students to and from school-related activities, including curricular, cocurricular, noncurricular, extracurricular, and supplementary activities; and

(iv) that portion of a building or facility under the temporary, exclusive control of a public or private school, a school district, or an association of such entities where conspicuous signs are prominently posted at each entrance that give actual notice to persons of the school-related use.

(f) This subdivision does not apply to:

(1) active licensed peace officers;

(2) military personnel or students participating in military training, who are on-duty, performing official duties;

(3) persons authorized to carry a pistol under section 624.714 while in a motor vehicle or outside of a motor vehicle to directly place a firearm in, or retrieve it from, the trunk or rear area of the vehicle;

(4) persons who keep or store in a motor vehicle pistols in accordance with section 624.714 or 624.715 or other firearms in accordance with section 97B.045;

(5) firearm safety or marksmanship courses or activities conducted on school property;

(6) possession of dangerous weapons, BB guns, or replica firearms by a ceremonial color guard;

(7) a gun or knife show held on school property;

(8) possession of dangerous weapons, BB guns, or replica firearms with written permission of the principal or other person having general control and supervision of the school or the director of a child care center; or

(9) persons who are on unimproved property owned or leased by a child care center, school, or school district unless the person knows that a student is currently present on the land for a school-related activity.

(g) Notwithstanding section 471.634, a school district or other entity composed exclusively of school districts may not regulate firearms, ammunition, or their respective components, when possessed or carried by nonstudents or nonemployees, in a manner that is inconsistent with this subdivision.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Disclosure of school records
Statute

LAWS

120A.22. Compulsory instruction.

7. Education records.

(a) A district, a charter school, or a nonpublic school that receives services or aid under sections 123B.40 to 123B.48 from which a student is transferring must transmit the student's educational records, within ten business days of a request, to the district, the charter school, or the nonpublic school in which the student is enrolling. Districts, charter schools, and nonpublic schools that receive services or aid under sections 123B.40 to 123B.48 must make reasonable efforts to determine the district, the charter school, or the nonpublic school in which a transferring student is next enrolling in order to comply with this subdivision.

(b) A closed charter school must transfer the student's educational records, within ten business days of the school's closure, to the student's school district of residence where the records must be retained unless the records are otherwise transferred under this subdivision.

(c) A school district, a charter school, or a nonpublic school that receives services or aid under sections 123B.40 to 123B.48 that transmits a student's educational records to another school district or other educational entity, charter school, or nonpublic school to which the student is transferring must include in the transmitted records information about any formal suspension, expulsion, and exclusion disciplinary action under sections 121A.40 to 121A.56. The district, the charter school, or the nonpublic school that receives services or aid under sections 123B.40 to 123B.48 must provide notice to a student and the student's parent or guardian that formal disciplinary records will be transferred as part of the student's educational record, in accordance with data practices under chapter 13 and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, United States Code, title 20, section 1232(g).

(d) Notwithstanding section 138.17, a principal or chief administrative officer must remove from a student's educational record and destroy a probable cause notice received under section 260B.171, subdivision 5, or paragraph (e), if one year has elapsed since the date of the notice and the principal or chief administrative officer has not received a disposition or court order related to the offense described in the notice. This paragraph does not apply if the student no longer attends the school when this one-year period expires.

(e) A principal or chief administrative officer who receives a probable cause notice under section 260B.171, subdivision 5, or a disposition or court order, must include a copy of that data in the student's educational records if they are transmitted to another school, unless the data are required to be destroyed under paragraph (d) or section 121A.75.

121A.44. Expulsion for possession of firearm.

(b) Notwithstanding chapter 13, a student's expulsion or withdrawal or transfer from a school after an expulsion action is initiated against the student for a weapons violation under paragraph (a) may be disclosed by the school district initiating the expulsion proceeding. Unless the information is otherwise public, the disclosure may be made only to another school district in connection with the possible admission of the student to the other district.

121A.47. Exclusion and expulsion procedures.

8. Access to pupil's records. At a reasonable time prior to the hearing, the pupil, parent or guardian, or representative, shall be given access to all public school system records pertaining to the pupil, including any tests or reports upon which the proposed action may be based.

121A.51. Reports to service agency.

The school board shall report any action taken pursuant to sections 121A.40. to 121A.56 to the appropriate public service agency, when the pupil is under the supervision of such agency.

121A.64. Notification; teachers' legitimate education interest.

(a) A classroom teacher has a legitimate educational interest in knowing which students placed in the teacher's classroom have a history of violent behavior, including any documented physical assault of a district employee by the student, and must be notified before such students are placed in the teacher's classroom.

(b) Representatives of the school board and the exclusive representative of the teachers shall discuss issues related to the model policy on student records adopted under Laws 1999, chapter 241, article 9, section 50, and any modifications adopted under Laws 2003, First Special Session chapter 9, for notifying classroom teachers and other school district employees having a legitimate educational interest in knowing about students with a history of violent behavior, including any documented physical assault of a district employee by students placed in classrooms. The representatives of the school board and the exclusive representative of the teachers also may discuss the need for intervention services or conflict resolution or training for staff related to placing students with a history of violent behavior in teachers' classrooms.

121A.75. Receipt of records; sharing.

1. Definitions.

(a) For purposes of this section "principal" means a principal or other person having general administrative control and supervision of a school.

(b) For purposes of this section, "school" means a public school under section 120A.22, subdivision 4; a nonpublic school under section 120A.22, subdivision 4, that elects to comply with this section; and a charter school under chapter 124E, but does not mean a home school.

2. Disposition orders.

(a) On receipt of a disposition order under section 260B.171, subdivision 3, the superintendent of the student's school district or chief administrative officer of the student's school must immediately transmit the order to the principal of the school where the student is in attendance. The principal must place the disposition order in the student's permanent education record. The principal must also immediately notify any counselor directly supervising or reporting on the behavior or progress of the student. In addition, the principal must immediately notify any teacher or administrator who directly supervises or reports on the behavior or progress of the student whom the principal believes needs the data to work with the student in an appropriate manner, to avoid being needlessly vulnerable, or to protect other persons from needless vulnerability. The principal may also notify other district employees, substitutes, and volunteers who are in direct contact with the student, if they determine these individuals need the data to work with the student in an appropriate manner, to avoid being needlessly vulnerable, or to protect other persons from needless vulnerability. When provided in the disposition order, the notice given under this paragraph by the principal must identify the student, outline the offense, and describe any conditions of probation about which the school must provide information.

(b) Information received under this subdivision is private data on individuals as defined in section 13.32 and is received for the limited purpose of serving the educational needs of the student and protecting students or staff. The data may not be further disseminated by the teacher, counselor, staff member, administrator, substitute, or volunteer, except as necessary to serve the student, to protect students or staff, or as otherwise required by law, and only to the following persons:

(1) the student; or

(2) the student's parent or guardian.

(c) If a student is removed from school as part of the disposition order, the superintendent of the student's school district or chief administrative officer of the student's school must maintain the copy of the order in a secure file and shall notify the principal when the student is returned to school. If the student is returned to a different school district or school, the student's probation officer must send a copy of the disposition order to the superintendent of the new school district or the chief administrative officer of the new school.

(d) The disposition order must be included if the student's permanent education record is released to another school district or educational entity to which the student is transferring under section 120A.22, subdivision 7.

(e) Notwithstanding section 138.17, a disposition order received under section 260B.171, subdivision 3, paragraph (a), must be destroyed when the student graduates from school or at the end of the school year in which the student reaches age 23, whichever is earlier. A disposition order received under section 260B.171, subdivision 3, paragraph (b), must be destroyed when the student is discharged from probation.

3. Peace officer records of children.

(a) A law enforcement agency must transmit the notice required by section 260B.171, subdivision 5, to the superintendent of the student's school district who must immediately transmit the notice to the principal of the school the student attends, or to the principal of the school the student attends if there is no superintendent. The principal must place the notice in the student's educational record. The principal must immediately notify any teacher, counselor, or administrator directly supervising the student who the principal believes needs the data to work with the student in an appropriate manner, to avoid being needlessly vulnerable, or to protect other persons from needless vulnerability. The principal may also notify other district employees, substitutes, or volunteers who are in direct contact with the student if the principal determines these individuals need the data to work with the juvenile in an appropriate manner, to avoid being needlessly vulnerable, or to protect other persons from needless vulnerability. When provided in the peace officer notice, the notice from the principal must identify the student and describe the alleged offense.

(b) Data received under this subdivision are private data on individuals under section 13.32 and are received for the limited purpose of serving the student's educational needs and protecting students or staff. The teacher, counselor, staff member, administrator, substitute, or volunteer must not further disseminate the data, except to communicate with the student or the student's parent or guardian as needed to serve the student, protect students or staff, or as otherwise required by law.

(c) The principal must include the notice in the student's educational record as required by section 120A.22, subdivision 7.

(d) If the county attorney determines not to proceed with a petition alleging any offense in section 260B.171, subdivision 3, paragraph (a), clauses (1) to (3), or directs the student into a diversion or mediation program, the county attorney must notify the superintendent of the student's school district who must immediately transmit the notice to the principal of the school the student attends, or to the principal of the school that the student attends if there is no superintendent. The notice must contain the name of the student and a summary of the resolution of the case. Notwithstanding section 138.17, the principal must delete the peace officer's report and notice from the student's educational record and destroy the data and make reasonable efforts to notify any teacher, counselor, staff member, administrator, substitute, or volunteer who received data from the peace officer notice.

(e) If the juvenile court makes a decision on a petition that alleges any offense in section 260B.171, subdivision 3, paragraph (a), clauses (1) to (3), and the decision affects a student and is not a disposition order, the court must notify the superintendent of the student's school district who must immediately transmit the notice to the principal of the school the student attends, or to the principal of the school that the student attends if there is no superintendent, of the decision. Notwithstanding section 138.17, the principal must delete the peace officer's report and notice from the student's educational record and destroy the data and make reasonable efforts to notify any teacher, counselor, staff member, administrator, substitute, or volunteer who received data from the peace officer notice.

(f) In addition to the data destruction requirements of this subdivision, a principal must comply with the requirements of section 120A.22, subdivision 7.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Data collection, review, and reporting of disciplinary policies and actions
Statute

LAWS

120A.24. Reporting.

4. Reports to the state. A superintendent must make an annual report to the commissioner of education by December 1 of the total number of nonpublic children reported as residing in the district. The report must include the following information:

(1) the number of children residing in the district attending nonpublic schools or receiving instruction from persons or institutions other than a public school;

(2) the number of children in clause (1) who are in compliance with section 120A.22 and this section; and

(3) the number of children in clause (1) who the superintendent has determined are not in compliance with section 120A.22 and this section.

5. Obligations. Nothing in this section alleviates the obligations under section 120A.22.

120B.36. School accountability.

1. School performance reports and public reporting.

(a) The commissioner shall report student academic performance data under section 120B.35, subdivisions 2 and 3; the percentages of students showing low, medium, and high growth under section 120B.35, subdivision 3, paragraph (b); school safety and student engagement and connection under section 120B.35, subdivision 3, paragraph (d); rigorous coursework under section 120B.35, subdivision 3, paragraph (c); the percentage of students under section 120B.35, subdivision 3, paragraph (b), clause (2), whose progress and performance levels are meeting career and college readiness benchmarks under sections 120B.30, subdivision 1, and 120B.35, subdivision 3, paragraph (e); longitudinal data on the progress of eligible districts in reducing disparities in students' academic achievement and realizing racial and economic integration under section 124D.861; the acquisition of English, and where practicable, native language academic literacy, including oral academic language, and the academic progress of all English learners enrolled in a Minnesota public school course or program who are currently or were previously counted as English learners under section 124D.59; two separate student-to-teacher ratios that clearly indicate the definition of teacher consistent with sections 122A.06 and 122A.15 for purposes of determining these ratios; staff characteristics excluding salaries; student enrollment demographics; foster care status, including all students enrolled in a Minnesota public school course or program who are currently or were previously in foster care, student homelessness, and district mobility; and extracurricular activities.

(b) The school performance report for a school site and a school district must include school performance reporting information and calculate proficiency rates as required by the most recently reauthorized Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

(c) The commissioner shall develop, annually update, and post on the department Web site school performance reports consistent with paragraph (a) and section 120B.11.

(d) The commissioner must make available performance reports by the beginning of each school year.

(e) A school or district may appeal its results in a form and manner determined by the commissioner and consistent with federal law. The commissioner's decision to uphold or deny an appeal is final.

(f) School performance data are nonpublic data under section 13.02, subdivision 9, until the commissioner publicly releases the data. The commissioner shall annually post school performance reports to the department's public Web site no later than September 1, except that in years when the reports reflect new performance standards, the commissioner shall post the school performance reports no later than October 1.

2. Student progress and other data.

(a) All data the department receives, collects, or creates under section 120B.11, governing the world's best workforce, or uses to determine federal expectations under the most recently reauthorized Elementary and Secondary Education Act, set state growth targets, and determine student growth, learning, and outcomes under section 120B.35 are nonpublic data under section 13.02, subdivision 9, until the commissioner publicly releases the data.

(b) Districts must provide parents sufficiently detailed summary data to permit parents to appeal under the most recently reauthorized federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The commissioner shall annually post federal expectations and state student growth, learning, and outcome data to the department's public Web site no later than September 1, except that in years when data or federal expectations reflect new performance standards, the commissioner shall post data on federal expectations and state student growth data no later than October 1.

121A.06. Reports of dangerous weapon incidents in school zones.

1. Definitions. As used in this section:

(1) "dangerous weapon" has the meaning given it in section 609.02, subdivision 6;

(2) "school" has the meaning given it in section 120A.22, subdivision 4; and

(3) "school zone" has the meaning given it in section 152.01, subdivision 14a, clauses (1) and (3).

2. Reports; content. School districts must electronically report to the commissioner of education incidents involving the use or possession of a dangerous weapon in school zones. The form must include the following information:

(1) a description of each incident, including a description of the dangerous weapon involved in the incident;

(2) where, at what time, and under what circumstances the incident occurred;

(3) information about the offender, other than the offender's name, including the offender's age; whether the offender was a student and, if so, where the offender attended school; and whether the offender was under school expulsion or suspension at the time of the incident;

(4) information about the victim other than the victim's name, if any, including the victim's age; whether the victim was a student and, if so, where the victim attended school; and if the victim was not a student, whether the victim was employed at the school;

(5) the cost of the incident to the school and to the victim; and

(6) the action taken by the school administration to respond to the incident.

The commissioner shall provide an electronic reporting format that allows school districts to provide aggregate data.

3. Reports; filing requirements. By July 31 of each year, each public school shall report incidents involving the use or possession of a dangerous weapon in school zones to the commissioner. The reports must be submitted using the electronic reporting system developed by the commissioner under subdivision 2. The commissioner shall compile the information it receives from the schools and report it annually to the commissioner of public safety and the legislature.

121A.031. School student bullying policy.

6. State model policy.

(b) The commissioner shall develop and post departmental procedures for:

(1) periodically reviewing district and school programs and policies for compliance with this section;

(2) investigating, reporting, and responding to noncompliance with this section, which may include an annual review of plans to improve and provide a safe and supportive school climate; and

(3) allowing students, parents, and educators to file a complaint about noncompliance with the commissioner.

121A.53. Report to commissioner of education.

1. Exclusions and expulsions; physical assaults. The school board must report through the department electronic reporting system each exclusion or expulsion and each physical assault of a district employee by a student within 30 days of the effective date of the dismissal action or assault to the commissioner of education. This report must include a statement of alternative educational services, or other sanction, intervention, or resolution in response to the assault given the pupil and the reason for, the effective date, and the duration of the exclusion or expulsion or other sanction, intervention, or resolution. The report must also include the student's age, grade, gender, race, and special education status.

2. Report.

(a) The school board must include state student identification numbers of affected pupils on all dismissal and other disciplinary reports required by the department. The department must report annually to the commissioner summary data on the number of dismissals and physical assaults of district employees by a student by age, grade, gender, race, and special education status of the affected pupils. All dismissal and other disciplinary reports must be submitted through the department electronic reporting system.

(b) The commissioner must aggregate the district data reported under this section and include the aggregated data, including aggregated data on physical assaults of a district employee by a student, in the annual school performance reports under section 120B.36.

121A.65. Review of policy.

The principal or other person having general control and supervision of the school, and representatives of parents, students, and staff in a school building shall confer at least annually to review the discipline policy and to assess whether the policy has been enforced. A school board must conduct an annual review of the districtwide discipline policy.

125A.0942. Standards for restrictive procedures.

3. Physical holding or seclusion.

(a) Physical holding or seclusion may be used only in an emergency. A school that uses physical holding or seclusion shall meet the following requirements:

(5) each time physical holding or seclusion is used, the staff person who implements or oversees the physical holding or seclusion documents, as soon as possible after the incident concludes, the following information:

(i) a description of the incident that led to the physical holding or seclusion;

(ii) why a less restrictive measure failed or was determined by staff to be inappropriate or impractical;

(iii) the time the physical holding or seclusion began and the time the child was released; and

(iv) a brief record of the child's behavioral and physical status;

(b) By February 1, 2015, and annually thereafter, stakeholders may, as necessary, recommend to the commissioner specific and measurable implementation and outcome goals for reducing the use of restrictive procedures and the commissioner must submit to the legislature a report on districts' progress in reducing the use of restrictive procedures that recommends how to further reduce these procedures and eliminate the use of seclusion. The statewide plan includes the following components: measurable goals; the resources, training, technical assistance, mental health services, and collaborative efforts needed to significantly reduce districts' use of seclusion; and recommendations to clarify and improve the law governing districts' use of restrictive procedures. The commissioner must consult with interested stakeholders when preparing the report, including representatives of advocacy organizations, special education directors, teachers, paraprofessionals, intermediate school districts, school boards, day treatment providers, county social services, state human services department staff, mental health professionals, and autism experts. Beginning with the 2016-2017 school year, in a form and manner determined by the commissioner, districts must report data quarterly to the department by January 15, April 15, July 15, and October 15 about individual students who have been secluded. By July 15 each year, districts must report summary data on their use of restrictive procedures to the department for the prior school year, July 1 through June 30, in a form and manner determined by the commissioner. The summary data must include information about the use of restrictive procedures, including use of reasonable force under section 121A.582.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Major Category
School Resource and Safety Officers (SROs/SSOs) and Truant/Attendance Officers
Sub Category
Authority and power to implement school arrest
Statute

LAWS

121A.67. Removal by peace officer.

2. Removal by peace officer. If a pupil who has an individualized education program is restrained or removed from a classroom, school building, or school grounds by a peace officer at the request of a school administrator or a school staff person during the school day twice in a 30-day period, the pupil's individualized education program team must meet to determine if the pupil's individualized education program is adequate or if additional evaluation is needed.

260A.06. Referral of truant students to school attendance review board.

1. Referral; notice.

An attendance officer or other school official may refer a student who is a continuing truant to the school attendance review board. The person making the referral shall provide a written notice by first class mail or other reasonable means to the student and the student's parent or legal guardian.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Certification or training
Statute

No relevant laws or regulations found.

Sub Category
MOUs, authorization, and/or funding
Statute

LAWS

126C.44. Safe schools levy.

(a) Each district may make a levy on all taxable property located within the district for the purposes specified in this section. The maximum amount which may be levied for all costs under this section shall be equal to $36 multiplied by the district's adjusted pupil units for the school year. The proceeds of the levy must be reserved and used for directly funding the following purposes or for reimbursing the cities and counties who contract with the district for the following purposes:

(1) to pay the costs incurred for the salaries, benefits, and transportation costs of peace officers and sheriffs for liaison in services in the district's schools;

(4) to pay the costs for security in the district's schools and on school property;

(b) For expenditures under paragraph (a), clause (1), the district must initially attempt to contract for services to be provided by peace officers or sheriffs with the police department of each city or the sheriff's department of the county within the district containing the school receiving the services. If a local police department or a county sheriff's department does not wish to provide the necessary services, the district may contract for these services with any other police or sheriff's department located entirely or partially within the school district's boundaries.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Major Category
State Education Agency Support
Sub Category
State model policies and implementation support
Statute

LAWS

121A.03. Model policy.

1. Model policy. The commissioner shall maintain and make available to school boards a model sexual, religious, and racial harassment and violence policy. The model policy shall address the requirements of subdivision 2, and may encourage violence prevention and character development education programs, consistent with section 120B.232, subdivision 1, to prevent and reduce policy violations.

2. Sexual, religious, and racial harassment and violence policy. A school board must adopt a written sexual, religious, and racial harassment and sexual, religious, and racial violence policy that conforms with chapter 363A. The policy shall apply to pupils, teachers, administrators, and other school personnel, include reporting procedures, and set forth disciplinary actions that will be taken for violation of the policy. Disciplinary actions must conform with collective bargaining agreements and sections 121A.41 to 121A.56. The policy must be conspicuously posted throughout each school building, given to each district employee and independent contractor at the time of entering into the person's employment contract, and included in each school's student handbook on school policies. Each school must develop a process for discussing the school's sexual, religious, and racial harassment and violence policy with students and school employees.

3. Submission to commissioner. Each school board must submit to the commissioner a copy of the sexual, religious, and racial harassment and sexual, religious, and racial violence policy the board has adopted.

121A.031. School student bullying policy.

6. State model policy.

(a) The commissioner, in consultation with the commissioner of human rights, shall develop and maintain a state model policy. A district or school that does not adopt and implement a local policy under subdivisions 3 to 5 must implement and may supplement the provisions of the state model policy. The commissioner must assist districts and schools under this subdivision to implement the state policy. The state model policy must:

(1) define prohibited conduct, consistent with this section;

(2) apply the prohibited conduct policy components in this section;

(3) for a child with a disability, whenever an evaluation by an individualized education program team or a section 504 team indicates that the child's disability affects the child's social skills development or the child is vulnerable to prohibited conduct because of the child's disability, the child's individualized education program or section 504 plan may address the skills and proficiencies the child needs to not engage in and respond to such conduct; and

(4) encourage violence prevention and character development education programs under section 120B.232, subdivision 1.

(b) The commissioner shall develop and post departmental procedures for:

(1) periodically reviewing district and school programs and policies for compliance with this section;

(2) investigating, reporting, and responding to noncompliance with this section, which may include an annual review of plans to improve and provide a safe and supportive school climate; and

(3) allowing students, parents, and educators to file a complaint about noncompliance with the commissioner.

(c) The commissioner must post on the department's Web site information indicating that when districts and schools allow non-curriculum-related student groups access to school facilities, the district or school must give all student groups equal access to the school facilities regardless of the content of the group members' speech.

121A.69. Hazing policy.

2. Model policy. The commissioner of education shall maintain and make available to school boards a model policy on student or staff hazing that addresses the requirements of subdivision 3.

122A.60. Staff development program.

1. Staff development committee.

(a) A school board must use the revenue authorized in section 122A.61 for

(1) teacher development and evaluation plans under this section 122A.40, subdivision 8, or 122A.41, subdivision 5;

(2) principal development and evaluation under section 123B.147, subdivision 3;

(3) in-service education programs under section 120B.22, subdivision 2; and

(4) other staff development needs.

(b) The board must establish an advisory staff development committee to develop the plan, assist site professional development teams in developing a site plan consistent with the goals of the plan, and evaluate staff development efforts at the site level. A majority of the advisory committee and the site professional development team must be teachers representing various grade levels, subject areas, and special education. The advisory committee must also include nonteaching staff, parents, and administrators

127A.052. School safety technical assistance center.

(a) The commissioner shall establish a school safety technical assistance center at the department to help districts and schools under section 121A.031 provide a safe and supportive learning environment and foster academic achievement for all students by focusing on prevention, intervention, support, and recovery efforts to develop and maintain safe and supportive schools. The center must work collaboratively with implicated state agencies identified by the center and schools, communities, and interested individuals and organizations to determine how to best use available resources.

(b) The center's services shall include:

(1) evidence-based policy review, development, and dissemination;

(2) single, point-of-contact services designed for schools, parents, and students seeking information or other help;

(3) qualitative and quantitative data gathering, interpretation, and dissemination of summary data for existing reporting systems and student surveys and the identification and pursuit of emerging trends and issues;

(4) assistance to districts and schools in using Minnesota student survey results to inform intervention and prevention programs;

(5) education and skill building;

(6) multisector and multiagency planning and advisory activities incorporating best practices and research; and

(7) administrative and financial support for school and district planning, schools recovering from incidents of violence, and school and district violence prevention education.

(c) The center shall:

(1) compile and make available to all districts and schools evidence-based elements and resources to develop and maintain safe and supportive schools;

(2) establish and maintain a central repository for collecting and analyzing information about prohibited conduct under section 121A.031, including, but not limited to:

(i) training materials on strategies and techniques to prevent and appropriately address prohibited conduct under section 121A.031;

(ii) model programming;

(iii) remedial responses consistent with section 121A.031, subdivision 2, paragraph (i); and

(iv) other resources for improving the school climate and preventing prohibited conduct under section 121A.031;

(3) assist districts and schools to develop strategies and techniques for effectively communicating with and engaging parents in efforts to protect and deter students from prohibited conduct under section 121A.031; and

(4) solicit input from social media experts on implementing this section.

(d) The commissioner shall provide administrative services including personnel, budget, payroll and contract services, and staff support for center activities including developing and disseminating materials, providing seminars, and developing and maintaining a Web site. Center staff shall include a center director, a data analyst coordinator, and trainers who provide training to affected state and local organizations under a fee-for-service agreement. The financial, administrative, and staff support the commissioner provides under this section must be based on an annual budget and work program developed by the center and submitted to the commissioner by the center director.

(e) School safety technical assistance center staff may consult with school safety center staff at the Department of Public Safety in providing services under this section.

(f) The center is voluntary and advisory. The center does not have enforcement, rulemaking, oversight, or regulatory authority.

(g) The center expires on June 30, 2019.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Funding appropriations
Statute

LAWS

120B.22. Violence prevention education.

3. Funding sources. Districts may accept funds from public and private sources for violence prevention programs developed and implemented under this section.

120B.23. Violence prevention education grants.

1. Grant program established. The commissioner of education, after consulting with the assistant commissioner of the Office of Drug Policy and Violence Prevention, shall establish a violence prevention education grant program to enable a school district, an education district, or a group of districts that cooperate for a particular purpose to develop and implement or to continue a violence prevention program for students in kindergarten through grade 12 that can be integrated into existing curriculum. A district or group of districts that elects to develop and implement or to continue a violence prevention program under section 120B.22 is eligible to apply for a grant under this section.

2. Grant application. To be eligible to receive a grant, a school district, an education district, a service cooperative, or a group of districts that cooperate for a particular purpose must submit an application to the commissioner in the form and manner and according to the timeline established by the commissioner. The application must describe how the applicant will: (1) continue or integrate into its existing K-12 curriculum a program for violence prevention that contains the program components listed in section 120B.22; (2) collaborate with local organizations involved in violence prevention and intervention; and (3) structure the program to reflect the characteristics of the children, their families and the community involved in the program. The commissioner may require additional information from the applicant. When reviewing the applications, the commissioner shall determine whether the applicant has met the requirements of this subdivision.

3. Grant awards.

(a) The commissioner may award grants for a violence prevention education program to eligible applicants as defined in subdivision 2. Grant amounts may not exceed $3 per resident pupil unit in the district or group of districts in the prior school year. Grant recipients should be geographically distributed throughout the state.

(b) School districts and charter schools may accept funds from private and other public sources for child sexual abuse prevention programs developed and implemented under sections 120B.021, subdivision 1, paragraph (d), and 120B.234, including federal funding under the Every Student Succeeds Act.

4. Grant proceeds. A successful applicant must use the grant money to develop and implement or to continue a violence prevention program according to the terms of the grant application.

120B.232. Character development education.

1. Character development education.

(a) Character education is the shared responsibility of parents, teachers, and members of the community. The legislature encourages districts to integrate or offer instruction on character education including, but not limited to, character qualities such as attentiveness, truthfulness, respect for authority, diligence, gratefulness, self-discipline, patience, forgiveness, respect for others, peacemaking, and resourcefulness. Instruction should be integrated into a district's existing programs, curriculum, or the general school environment. To the extent practicable, instruction should be integrated into positive behavioral intervention strategies, under section 122A.627. The commissioner shall provide assistance at the request of a district to develop character education curriculum and programs.

(b) Character development education under paragraph (a) may include a voluntary elementary, middle, and high school program that incorporates the history and values of Congressional Medal of Honor recipients and may be offered as part of the social studies, English language arts, or other curriculum, as a schoolwide character building and veteran awareness initiative, or as an after-school program, among other possibilities.

1a. Staff development; continuing education.

(a) Staff development opportunities under section 122A.60 may include training in character development education that incorporates the history and values of Congressional Medal of Honor recipients under subdivision 1, paragraph (b), and is provided without cost to the interested school or district.

(b) Local continuing education and relicensure committees or other local relicensure committees under section 122A.18, subdivision 4, are encouraged to approve up to six clock hours of continuing education for licensed teachers who complete the training in character development education under paragraph (a).

2. Funding sources. The commissioner must first use federal funds for character development education programs to the extent available under United States Code, title 20, section 7247. Districts may accept funds from private and other public sources for character development education programs developed and implemented under this section, including programs funded through the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation, among other sources.

121A.61. Discipline and removal of students from class.

3. Policy components. The policy must include at least the following components:

(q) an agreement regarding procedures to coordinate crisis services to the extent funds are available with the county board responsible for implementing sections 245.487 to 245.4889 for students with a serious emotional disturbance or other students who have an individualized education program whose behavior may be addressed by crisis intervention;

122A.60. Staff development program.

1. Staff development committee.

(a) A school board must use the revenue authorized in section 122A.61 for

(1) teacher development and evaluation plans under this section 122A.40, subdivision 8, or 122A.41, subdivision 5;

(2) principal development and evaluation under section 123B.147, subdivision 3;

(3) in-service education programs under section 120B.22, subdivision 2; and

(4) other staff development needs.

(b) The board must establish an advisory staff development committee to develop the plan, assist site professional development teams in developing a site plan consistent with the goals of the plan, and evaluate staff development efforts at the site level. A majority of the advisory committee and the site professional development team must be teachers representing various grade levels, subject areas, and special education. The advisory committee must also include nonteaching staff, parents, and administrators

126C.44. Safe schools levy.

(a) Each district may make a levy on all taxable property located within the district for the purposes specified in this section. The maximum amount which may be levied for all costs under this section shall be equal to $36 multiplied by the district's adjusted pupil units for the school year. The proceeds of the levy must be reserved and used for directly funding the following purposes or for reimbursing the cities and counties who contract with the district for the following purposes:

(1) to pay the costs incurred for the salaries, benefits, and transportation costs of peace officers and sheriffs for liaison in services in the district's schools;

(2) to pay the costs for a drug abuse prevention program as defined in section 609.101, subdivision 3, paragraph (e), in the elementary schools;

(3) to pay the costs for a gang resistance education training curriculum in the district's schools;

(4) to pay the costs for security in the district's schools and on school property;

(5) to pay the costs for other crime prevention, drug abuse, student and staff safety, voluntary opt-in suicide prevention tools, and violence prevention measures taken by the school district;

(6) to pay costs for licensed school counselors, licensed school nurses, licensed school social workers, licensed school psychologists, and licensed alcohol and chemical dependency counselors to help provide early responses to problems;

(7) to pay for facility security enhancements including laminated glass, public announcement systems, emergency communications devices, and equipment and facility modifications related to violence prevention and facility security;

(8) to pay for costs associated with improving the school climate; or

(9) to pay costs for colocating and collaborating with mental health professionals who are not district employees or contractors.

(b) For expenditures under paragraph (a), clause (1), the district must initially attempt to contract for services to be provided by peace officers or sheriffs with the police department of each city or the sheriff's department of the county within the district containing the school receiving the services. If a local police department or a county sheriff's department does not wish to provide the necessary services, the district may contract for these services with any other police or sheriff's department located entirely or partially within the school district's boundaries.

(c) A school district that is a member of an intermediate school district may include in its authority under this section the costs associated with safe schools activities authorized under paragraph (a) for intermediate school district programs. This authority must not exceed $15 times the adjusted pupil units of the member districts. This authority is in addition to any other authority authorized under this section. Revenue raised under this paragraph must be transferred to the intermediate school district.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Major Category
Other/Uncategorized
Sub Category
Professional immunity or liability
Statute

LAWS

120A.32. Officers, teachers; Neglect of duty, penalty.

Any school officer, truant officer, public or nonpublic school teacher, principal, district superintendent, or person providing instruction other than a parent refusing, willfully failing, or neglecting to perform any duty imposed by sections 120A.22, 120A.26, 120A.35, 120A.41, and 123B.03 is guilty of a misdemeanor. All persons found guilty shall be punished for each offense by a fine of not more than $10 or by imprisonment for not more than ten days. All fines, when collected, shall be paid into the county treasury for the benefit of the school district in which the offense is committed.

121A.29. Reporting; chemical abuse.

1. Teacher's duty. A teacher in a nonpublic school participating in a school district chemical use program, or a public school teacher, who knows or has reason to believe that a student is using, possessing, or transferring alcohol or a controlled substance while on the school premises or involved in school-related activities, shall immediately notify the school's chemical abuse preassessment team of this information. A teacher who complies with this section shall be defended and indemnified under section 466.07, subdivision 1, in any action for damages arising out of the compliance.

2. Other reports. Nothing in this section prevents a teacher or any other school employee from reporting to a law enforcement agency any violation of law occurring on school premises or at school sponsored events.

121A.582. Student discipline; reasonable force.

1. Reasonable force standard.

(a) A teacher or school principal, in exercising the person's lawful authority, may use reasonable force when it is necessary under the circumstances to correct or restrain a student or prevent bodily harm or death to another.

(b) A school employee, school bus driver, or other agent of a district, in exercising the person's lawful authority, may use reasonable force when it is necessary under the circumstances to restrain a student or prevent bodily harm or death to another.

(c) Paragraphs (a) and (b) do not authorize conduct prohibited under section 125A.0942.

2. Civil liability.

(a) A teacher or school principal who, in the exercise of the person's lawful authority, uses reasonable force under the standard in subdivision 1, paragraph (a), has a defense against a civil action for damages under section 123B.25.

(b) A school employee, bus driver, or other agent of a district who, in the exercise of the person's lawful authority, uses reasonable force under the standard in subdivision 1, paragraph (b), has a defense against a civil action for damages under section 123B.25.

3. Criminal prosecution.

(a) A teacher or school principal who, in the exercise of the person's lawful authority, uses reasonable force under the standard in subdivision 1, paragraph (a), has a defense against a criminal prosecution under section 609.06, subdivision 1.

(b) A school employee, bus driver, or other agent of a district who, in the exercise of the person's lawful authority, uses reasonable force under the standard in subdivision 1, paragraph (b), has a defense against a criminal prosecution under section 609.06, subdivision 1.

4. Supplementary rights and defenses. Any right or defense in this section is supplementary to those specified in section 121A.58, 121A.67, 123B.25, or 609.06, subdivision 1.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Community input or involvement
Statute

LAWS

120B.22.Violence prevention education.

1. Violence prevention curriculum.

(a) The commissioner of education, in consultation with the commissioners of health and human services, state minority councils, battered women's and domestic abuse programs, battered women's shelters, sexual assault centers, representatives of religious communities, and the assistant commissioner of the Office of Drug Policy and Violence Prevention, shall assist districts on request in developing or implementing a violence prevention program for students in kindergarten to grade 12 that can be integrated into existing curriculum. The purpose of the program is to help students learn how to resolve conflicts within their families and communities in nonviolent, effective ways.

(b) Each district is encouraged to integrate into its existing curriculum a program for violence prevention that includes at least:

(1) a comprehensive, accurate, and age appropriate curriculum on violence prevention, nonviolent conflict resolution, sexual, racial, and cultural harassment, self-protection, and student hazing that promotes equality, respect, understanding, effective communication, individual responsibility, thoughtful decision making, positive conflict resolution, useful coping skills, critical thinking, listening and watching skills, and personal safety;

(2) planning materials, guidelines, and other accurate information on preventing physical and emotional violence, identifying and reducing the incidence of sexual, racial, and cultural harassment, and reducing child abuse and neglect;

(3) a special parent education component of early childhood family education programs to prevent child abuse and neglect and to promote positive parenting skills, giving priority to services and outreach programs for at-risk families;

(4) involvement of parents and other community members, including the clergy, business representatives, civic leaders, local elected officials, law enforcement officials, and the county attorney;

(5) collaboration with local community services, agencies, and organizations that assist in violence intervention or prevention, including family-based services, crisis services, life management skills services, case coordination services, mental health services, and early intervention services;

(6) collaboration among districts and service cooperatives;

(7) targeting early adolescents for prevention efforts, especially early adolescents whose personal circumstances may lead to violent or harassing behavior;

(8) opportunities for teachers to receive in-service training or attend other programs on strategies or curriculum designed to assist students in intervening in or preventing violence in school and at home; and

(9) administrative policies that reflect, and a staff that models, nonviolent behaviors that do not display or condone sexual, racial, or cultural harassment or student hazing.

(c) The department may provide assistance at a neutral site to a nonpublic school participating in a district's program.

2. In-service training. Each district is encouraged to provide training for district staff and school board members on the following:

(1) helping students identify violence in the family and the community so that students may learn to resolve conflicts in effective, nonviolent ways

(2) responding to a disclosure of child sexual abuse in a supportive, appropriate manner; and

(3) complying with mandatory reporting requirements under section 626.556

The in-service training must be ongoing and involve experts familiar with sexual abuse, domestic violence, and personal safety issues.

3. Funding sources. Districts may accept funds from public and private sources for violence prevention programs developed and implemented under this section.

121A.031. School student bullying policy.

5. Safe and supportive schools programming.

(b) Districts and schools are encouraged to:

(1) engage all students in creating a safe and supportive school environment;

(2) partner with parents and other community members to develop and implement prevention and intervention programs;

(3) engage all students and adults in integrating education, intervention, and other remedial responses into the school environment;

(4) train student bystanders to intervene in and report incidents of prohibited conduct to the school's primary contact person;

(5) teach students to advocate for themselves and others;

(6) prevent inappropriate referrals to special education of students who may engage in prohibited conduct; and

(7) foster student collaborations that foster a safe and supportive school climate.

121A.61. Discipline and removal of students from class.

1. Required policy. Each school board must adopt a written districtwide school discipline policy which includes written rules of conduct for students, minimum consequences for violations of the rules, and grounds and procedures for removal of a student from class. The policy must be developed in consultation with administrators, teachers, employees, pupils, parents, community members, law enforcement agencies, county attorney offices, social service agencies, and such other individuals or organizations as the board determines appropriate. A school site council may adopt additional provisions to the policy subject to the approval of the school board.

127A.051. School safety technical assistance council.

1. Establishment and membership; terms.

(a) A 23-member multiagency leadership council is established to improve school climate and school safety so that all Minnesota students in prekindergarten through grade 12 schools and higher education institutions have a safe and supportive learning environment in order to maximize each student's learning potential.

(b) The council shall consist of:

(1) the commissioners or their designees from the Departments of Education, Health, Human Rights, Human Services, Public Safety, and Corrections, and the Office of Higher Education;

(2) one representative each from the Minnesota Association of School Administrators, Minnesota School Boards Association, Elementary School Principals Association, Association of Secondary School Principals, and Education Minnesota as selected by each organization;

(3) two representatives each of student support personnel, parents, and students as selected by the commissioner of education;

(4) two representatives of local law enforcement as selected by the commissioner of public safety;

(5) two representatives of the judicial branch as selected by the chief justice of the Supreme Court; and

(6) one charter school representative selected by the Minnesota Association of Charter Schools.

(c) A member serves at the pleasure of their appointing authority and continues to serve until their successor is appointed.

2. Duties. The council must provide leadership for the following activities:

(1) establishment of norms and standards for prevention, intervention, and support around issues of prohibited conduct;

(2) advancement of evidence-based policy and best practices to improve school climate and promote school safety;

(3) development and dissemination of resources and training for schools and communities about issues of prohibited conduct under section 121A.031, and other school safety-related issues; and

(4) develop policies and procedures for the services provided by the school climate center under section 127A.052.

3. Meetings; chair. The commissioner of education must convene the first meeting of the council by October 1, 2014, and must serve as chair. The council must meet at least one time per year. The council does not need a quorum to conduct its meetings.

4. Compensation. Council members are not eligible for compensation or reimbursement for expenses related to council activities.

5. Support. The Department of Education and the Department of Public Safety must provide technical assistance to council members upon request. The council, upon request, must consult with the school safety technical assistance center and the school safety center.

6. Reporting. The council must report its activities annually by October 1, to the commissioner of education. The Department of Education must post the council's meeting notices and other relevant information regarding its duties on the agency's Web site.

7. Expiration. The council expires on June 30, 2019.

127A.052. School safety technical assistance center.

(a) The commissioner shall establish a school safety technical assistance center at the department to help districts and schools under section 121A.031 provide a safe and supportive learning environment and foster academic achievement for all students by focusing on prevention, intervention, support, and recovery efforts to develop and maintain safe and supportive schools. The center must work collaboratively with implicated state agencies identified by the center and schools, communities, and interested individuals and organizations to determine how to best use available resources.

(b) The center's services shall include:

(1) evidence-based policy review, development, and dissemination;

(2) single, point-of-contact services designed for schools, parents, and students seeking information or other help;

(3) qualitative and quantitative data gathering, interpretation, and dissemination of summary data for existing reporting systems and student surveys and the identification and pursuit of emerging trends and issues;

(4) assistance to districts and schools in using Minnesota student survey results to inform intervention and prevention programs;

(5) education and skill building;

(6) multisector and multiagency planning and advisory activities incorporating best practices and research; and

(7) administrative and financial support for school and district planning, schools recovering from incidents of violence, and school and district violence prevention education.

(c) The center shall:

(1) compile and make available to all districts and schools evidence-based elements and resources to develop and maintain safe and supportive schools;

(2) establish and maintain a central repository for collecting and analyzing information about prohibited conduct under section 121A.031, including, but not limited to:

(i) training materials on strategies and techniques to prevent and appropriately address prohibited conduct under section 121A.031;

(ii) model programming;

(iii) remedial responses consistent with section 121A.031, subdivision 2, paragraph (i); and

(iv) other resources for improving the school climate and preventing prohibited conduct under section 121A.031;

(3) assist districts and schools to develop strategies and techniques for effectively communicating with and engaging parents in efforts to protect and deter students from prohibited conduct under section 121A.031; and

(4) solicit input from social media experts on implementing this section.

(d) The commissioner shall provide administrative services including personnel, budget, payroll and contract services, and staff support for center activities including developing and disseminating materials, providing seminars, and developing and maintaining a Web site. Center staff shall include a center director, a data analyst coordinator, and trainers who provide training to affected state and local organizations under a fee-for-service agreement. The financial, administrative, and staff support the commissioner provides under this section must be based on an annual budget and work program developed by the center and submitted to the commissioner by the center director.

(e) School safety technical assistance center staff may consult with school safety center staff at the Department of Public Safety in providing services under this section.

(f) The center is voluntary and advisory. The center does not have enforcement, rulemaking, oversight, or regulatory authority.

(g) The center expires on June 30, 2019.

260A.01. Truancy programs and services.

(a) The programs in this chapter are designed to provide a continuum of intervention and services to support families and children in keeping children in school and combating truancy and educational neglect. School districts, county attorneys, and law enforcement may establish the programs and coordinate them with other community-based truancy services in order to provide the necessary and most effective intervention for children and their families. This continuum of intervention and services involves progressively intrusive intervention, beginning with strong service-oriented efforts at the school and community level and involving the court's authority only when necessary.

(b) Consistent with section 125A.091, subdivision 5, a parent's refusal to provide the parent's child with sympathomimetic medications does not constitute educational neglect.

260A.04. Community-based truancy projects and service centers

1. Establishment.

(a) Community-based truancy projects and service centers may be established to:

(1) provide for identification of students with school attendance problems;

(2) facilitate the provision of services geared to address the underlying issues that are contributing to a student's truant behavior; and

(3) provide facilities to receive truant students from peace officers and probation officers.

(b) Truancy projects and service centers may provide any of these services and shall provide for referral of children and families to other appropriate programs and services.

2. Community-based action projects. Schools, community agencies, law enforcement, parent associations, and other interested groups may cooperate to provide coordinated intervention, prevention, and educational services for truant students and their families. Services may include:

(1) assessment for underlying issues that are contributing to the child's truant behavior;

(2) referral to other community-based services for the child and family, such as individual or family counseling, educational testing, psychological evaluations, tutoring, mentoring, and mediation;

(3) transition services to integrate the child back into school and to help the child succeed once there;

(4) culturally sensitive programming and staffing; and

(5) increased school response, including in-school suspension, better attendance monitoring and enforcement, after-school study programs, and in-service training for teachers and staff.

3. Truancy service centers.

(a) Truancy service centers may be established as facilities to receive truant students from peace officers and probation officers and provide other appropriate services. A truancy service center may:

(1) assess a truant student's attendance situation, including enrollment status, verification of truancy, and school attendance history;

(2) assist in coordinating intervention efforts where appropriate, including checking with juvenile probation and children and family services to determine whether an active case is pending and facilitating transfer to an appropriate facility, if indicated; and evaluating the need for and making referral to a health clinic, chemical dependency treatment, protective services, social or recreational programs, or other school or community-based services and programs described in subdivision 2;

(3) contact the parents or legal guardian of the truant student and release the truant student to the custody of the parents, guardian, or other suitable person; and

(4) facilitate the student's earliest possible return to school.

(b) Truancy service centers may not accept:

(1) juveniles taken into custody for violations of law that would be crimes if committed by adults;

(2) intoxicated juveniles;

(3) ill or injured juveniles; or

(4) juveniles older than mandatory school attendance age.

(c) Truancy service centers may expand their service capability in order to receive curfew violators and take appropriate action, such as coordination of intervention efforts, contacting parents, and developing strategies to ensure that parents assume responsibility for their children's curfew violations.

260A.05. School attendance review boards.

1. Establishment. A school district or charter school may establish one or more school attendance review boards to exercise the powers and duties in this section. The school district or charter school board shall appoint the members of the school attendance review board and designate the schools within the board's jurisdiction. Members of a school attendance review board may include:

(1) the superintendent of the school district or the superintendent's designee or charter school director or the director's designee;

(2) a principal and one or more other school officials from within the district or charter school;

(3) parent representatives;

(4) representatives from community agencies that provide services for truant students and their families;

(5) a juvenile probation officer;

(6) school counselors and attendance officers; and

(7) law enforcement officers.

2. General powers and duties. A school attendance review board shall prepare an annual plan to promote interagency and community cooperation and to reduce duplication of services for students with school attendance problems. The plan shall include a description of truancy procedures and services currently in operation within the board's jurisdiction, including the programs and services under section 260A.04. A board may provide consultant services to, and coordinate activities of, truancy programs and services. If a board determines that it will be unable to provide services for all truant students who are referred to it, the board shall establish procedures and criteria for determining whether to accept referrals of students or refer them for other appropriate action.

3. Oversight of truant students. A school attendance review board shall oversee referrals of truant students and provide appropriate intervention and services under section 260A.06. The board shall establish procedures for documenting student attendance and verifying actions and interventions with respect to truant students and their families.

260A.06. Referral of truant students to school attendance review board.

1. Referral; notice.

An attendance officer or other school official may refer a student who is a continuing truant to the school attendance review board. The person making the referral shall provide a written notice by first class mail or other reasonable means to the student and the student's parent or legal guardian. The notice must:

(1) include the name and address of the board to which the student has been referred and the reason for the referral; and

(2) indicate that the student, the parent or legal guardian, and the referring person will meet with the board to determine a proper disposition of the referral, unless the board refers the student directly to the county attorney or for other appropriate legal action.

2. Meeting; community services.

(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b), the school attendance review board shall schedule the meeting described in subdivision 1 and provide notice of the meeting by first class mail or other reasonable means to the student, parent or guardian, and referring person. If the board determines that available community services may resolve the attendance problems of the truant student, the board shall refer the student or the student's parent or guardian to participate in the community services. The board may develop an agreement with the student and parent or guardian that specifies the actions to be taken. The board shall inform the student and parent or guardian that failure to comply with any agreement or to participate in appropriate community services will result in a referral to the county attorney under subdivision 3. The board may require the student or parent or guardian to provide evidence of participation in available community services or compliance with any agreement.

(b) A school attendance review board may refer a student directly to the county attorney or for other appropriate legal action under subdivision 3 if it has established procedures and criteria for these referrals.

3. Referral to county attorney; other appropriate action.

If the school attendance review board determines that available community services cannot resolve the attendance problems of the truant student, if the student or the parent or guardian has failed to comply with any referrals or agreements under subdivision 2 or to otherwise cooperate with the board, or if the board determines that a student should be referred directly under this subdivision, the board may:

(1) refer the matter to the county attorney under section 260A.07, if the county attorney has elected to participate in the truancy mediation program; or

(2) if the county attorney has not elected to participate in the truancy mediation program, refer the matter for appropriate legal action against the child or the child's parent or guardian under chapter 260 or section 120A.34.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Other or Uncategorized
Statute

LAWS

119A.035. School crisis response teams.

1. Commissioner's duties. To ensure timely responses to school crises, the commissioner must work in cooperation with the Minnesota School Safety Center to collect, maintain, and make available to schools contact information for crisis response teams throughout the state.

2. Crisis response teams. In regions of Minnesota where an existing crisis response team has not been formed by a school district, county, or city, the commissioner, in cooperation with the Minnesota School Safety Center, must convene a working group in each region to develop a plan to form a crisis response team for that region. Team members from the public and private sectors may represent various disciplines, including school administrators, guidance counselors, psychologists, social workers, teachers, nurses, security experts, media relations professionals, and other related areas.

121A.59. Bus transportation a privilege not a right.

Transportation by school bus is a privilege not a right for an eligible student. A student's eligibility to ride a school bus may be revoked for a violation of school bus safety or conduct policies, or for violation of any other law governing student conduct on a school bus, pursuant to a written school district discipline policy. Revocation of a student's bus riding privilege is not an exclusion, expulsion, or suspension under the Pupil Fair Dismissal Act. Revocation procedures for a student who is an individual with a disability under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, United States Code, title 20, section 1400 et seq., section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, United States Code, title 29, section 794, and the Americans with Disabilities Act, Public Law 101-336, are governed by these provisions.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Major Category
Sub Category
Statute
Documents available for download or to print: (PDFs; open in second window)