South Carolina

To view this state’s school discipline laws and regulations, scroll to a subcategory of interest and select “Laws and Regulations.”

Regulation Set
Major Category
General Provisions
Sub Category
Authority to develop and establish rules of conduct
Statute

LAWS

59-5-60. General powers of Board.

The State Board of Education shall have the power to:

(1) Adopt policies, rules and regulations not inconsistent with the laws of the State for its own government and for the government of the free public schools.

59-5-65. Powers and responsibilities of State Board of Education.

The State Board of Education shall have the power and responsibility to:

(1) Establish on or before August 15, 1985, regulations prescribing minimum standards of conduct and behavior that must be met by all pupils as a condition to the right of pupils to attend the public schools of the State. The rules shall take into account the necessity of proper conduct on the part of all pupils in order that the welfare of the greatest possible number of pupils shall be promoted notwithstanding that the rules may result in suspension or expulsion of pupils, provided, however, that disciplinary procedures shall be in compliance with Public Law 94-142.

(2) Promulgate on or before August 15, 1985, regulations prescribing a uniform system of minimum enforcement by the various school districts of the rules of conduct and behavior.

(3) Promulgate rules prescribing scholastic standards of achievement. The rules shall take into account the necessity for scholastic progress in order that the welfare of the greatest possible number of pupils shall be promoted. School districts may impose additional standards of conduct and may impose additional penalties for the violation of such standards of behavior, provided, however, that disciplinary procedures shall be in compliance with Public Law 94-142;

(4) Establish on or before July 1, 1985, regulations prescribing a uniform system of enforcement by the various school districts of the state compulsory attendance laws and regulations promulgated pursuant to 59-65-90.

59-19-90. General powers and duties of school trustees.

The board of trustees shall also:

(3) Promulgate rules and regulations. Promulgate rules prescribing scholastic standards of achievement and standards of conduct and behavior that must be met by all pupils as a condition to the right of such pupils to attend the public schools of such district. The rules shall take into account the necessity of proper conduct on the part of all pupils and the necessity for scholastic progress in order that the welfare of the greatest possible number of pupils shall be promoted notwithstanding that such rules may result in the ineligibility of pupils who fail to observe the required standards, and require the suspension or permanent dismissal of such pupils;

59-17-135. Character education.

(B) Each local school board of trustees of the State must develop a policy addressing character education. Any character education program implemented by a district as a result of an adopted policy must, to the extent possible, incorporate character traits including, but not limited to, the following: respect for authority and respect for others, honesty, self-control, cleanliness, courtesy, good manners, cooperation, citizenship, patriotism, courage, fairness, kindness, self-respect, compassion, diligence, good work ethics, sound educational habits, generosity, punctuality, cheerfulness, patience, sportsmanship, loyalty, and virtue. Local school boards must include all sectors of the community, as referenced in subsection (A)(4), in the development of a policy and in the development of any program implemented as a result of the policy. As part of any policy and program developed by the local school board, an evaluation component must be included.

59-63-140. Local school districts to adopt policies prohibiting harassment; required components; model policies by State Board of Education; bullying prevention programs.

(A) Before January 1, 2007, each local school district shall adopt a policy prohibiting harassment, intimidation, or bullying at school. The school district shall involve parents and guardians, school employees, volunteers, students, administrators, and community representatives in the process of creating the policy.

(B) The policy must include, but not be limited to, the following components:

(1) a statement prohibiting harassment, intimidation, or bullying of a student;

(2) a definition of harassment, intimidation, or bullying no less inclusive than the definition in Section 59 63 120;

(3) a description of appropriate student behavior;

(4) consequences and appropriate remedial actions for persons committing acts of harassment, intimidation, or bullying, and for persons engaging in reprisal or retaliation;

(5) procedures for reporting acts of harassment, intimidation, or bullying, to include a provision for reporting anonymously. However, formal disciplinary action must not be taken solely on the basis of an anonymous report. The procedures must identify the appropriate school personnel responsible for taking the report and investigating the complaint;

(6) procedures for prompt investigation of reports of serious violations and complaints;

(7) a statement that prohibits reprisal or retaliation against a person who reports an act of harassment, intimidation, or bullying;

(8) consequences and appropriate remedial action for persons found to have falsely accused another;

(9) a process for discussing the district's harassment, intimidation, or bullying policy with students; and

(10) a statement of how the policy is to be publicized, including notice that the policy applies to participation in school sponsored functions.

(C) To assist local school districts in developing policies for the prevention of harassment, intimidation, or bullying, the State Board of Education shall develop model policies applicable to grades kindergarten through twelve. Additionally, the State Board of Education shall develop teacher preparation program standards on the identification and prevention of bullying. The model policies and standards must be developed no later than September 1, 2006.

(D) The local school board shall ensure that the school district's policy developed pursuant to this article is included in the school district's publication of the comprehensive rules, procedures, and standards of conduct for schools and in the student's handbook.

(E) Information regarding a local school district policy against harassment, intimidation, or bullying must be incorporated into a school's employee training program. Training also should be provided to school volunteers who have significant contact with students.

(F) Schools and school districts are encouraged to establish bullying prevention programs and other initiatives involving school staff, students, administrators, volunteers, parents, law enforcement, and community members.

59-63-220. Suspension of pupils by administrator.

Any district board may confer upon any administrator the authority to suspend a pupil from a teacher's class or from the school not in excess of ten days for any one offense and for not more than thirty days in any one school year but no such administrator may suspend a pupil from school during the last ten days of a year if the suspension will make the pupil ineligible to receive credit for the school year without the approval of the school board unless the presence of the pupil constitutes an actual threat to a class or a school or a hearing is granted within twenty four hours of the suspension.

59-63-280. "Paging device" defined; adoption of policies addressing student possession.

(A) For purposes of this section, "paging device" means a telecommunications, to include mobile telephones, device that emits an audible signal, vibrates, displays a message, or otherwise summons or delivers a communication to the possessor.

(B) The board of trustees of each school district shall adopt a policy that addresses student possession of paging devices as defined in subsection (A). This policy must be included in the district's written student conduct standards. If the policy includes confiscation of a paging device, as defined in subsection (A), it should also provide for the return of the device to the owner.

59-63-1330. Discretion of school board.

Nothing in this article shall abrogate the authority of any public school district and its governing board to take such disciplinary action as it is otherwise empowered by law to take against any student for misconduct including, but not limited to, expulsion, and nothing in this chapter shall require that any student be assigned to such an alternative school. These decisions shall rest solely in the discretion of the district and school board, regardless of the offense, record of the child, or other information presented from any source.

REGULATIONS

R43-279. Minimum Standards of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Enforcement Procedures to be Implemented by Local School Districts. [SC ADC 43-279]

II. Previously Adopted School District Discipline Policies

This regulation is established as a uniform system of minimum disciplinary enforcement for the school districts of South Carolina. School districts, which previously have adopted discipline policies that are consistent with and contain the elements included in this regulation, may retain their local policies as adopted.

Sub Category
Scope
Statute

LAWS

No relevant laws found.

REGULATIONS

R43-279. Minimum Standards of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Enforcement Procedures to be Implemented by Local School Districts.

I. Expectations for Student Conduct in South Carolina Public Schools

Students in the public schools of South Carolina enjoy the same basic rights of United States citizenship as do other United States citizens. The rights of students are supported by the responsibility to insure that the rights of others are respected. This regulation is adopted with the intent to better assure that the opportunity to enjoy the benefits of public education is available to all those attending the public schools of the state of South Carolina.

II. Previously Adopted School District Discipline Policies

This regulation is established as a uniform system of minimum disciplinary enforcement for the school districts of South Carolina. School districts, which previously have adopted discipline policies that are consistent with and contain the elements included in this regulation, may retain their local policies as adopted.

III. Levels of Student Misconduct

A. The levels of student misconduct considered in this regulation are arranged by degrees of seriousness. The levels are arranged from the least serious to the most serious.

B. Three levels of student misconduct are identified: disorderly conduct, disruptive conduct, and criminal conduct. The levels are defined in this regulation.

C. This regulation includes a listing of possible sanctions for the three levels of student misconduct. As the levels increase in seriousness, the severity of possible disciplinary sanctions increases.

D. Suggested sanctions within the Level I misconduct category range from verbal reprimand to in-school suspension. Level II misconduct includes sanctions ranging from temporary removal from class to expulsion, while Level III misconduct includes sanctions ranging from out-of-school suspension to appropriate action within the criminal justice system.

E. A local school board, in its discretion, may authorize more stringent standards than those contained in this regulation.

IV. Minimum Standards

A. Disorderly Conduct-Level I

1. Disorderly conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which tend to impede orderly classroom procedures or instructional activities, orderly operation of the school, or the frequency or seriousness of which disturb the classroom or school. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within-school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of disorderly conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Classroom tardiness;

b. Cheating on examinations or classroom assignments;

c. Lying;

d. Acting in a manner so as to interfere with the instructional process;

e. Abusive language between or among students;

f. Failure to complete assignments or carry out directions;

g. Use of forged notes or excuses;

h. Cutting class;

i. School tardiness;

j. Truancy;

k. Other disorderly acts as determined by local school authorities.

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of disorderly conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the staff member should take immediate action to rectify the misconduct. The staff member should apply an appropriate sanction, and should maintain a record of the misconduct and the sanction.

b. If, either in the opinion of the staff member or according to local school board policy, a certain misconduct is not immediately rectifiable, the problem should be referred to the appropriate administrator for action specified by local school board policy.

c. The administrator should meet with the reporting staff member, and, if necessary, the student and the parent or guardian, and should effect the appropriate disciplinary action.

d. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of disorderly conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Verbal reprimand;

b. Withdrawal of privileges;

c. Demerits;

d. Detention;

e. Corporal punishment;

f. In-school suspension;

g. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

B. Disruptive Conduct-Level II

1. Disruptive conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which are directed against persons or property, and the consequences of which tend to endanger the health or safety of oneself or others in the school. Some instances of disruptive conduct may overlap certain criminal offenses, justifying both administrative sanctions and court proceedings. Disorderly conduct (Level I) may be reclassified as disruptive conduct (Level II) if it occurs three or more times. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of disruptive conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Use of an intoxicant;

b. Fighting;

c. Vandalism (minor);

d. Stealing;

e. Threats against others;

f. Trespass;

g. Abusive language to staff;

h. Refusal to obey school personnel or agents (such as volunteer aides or chaperones) whose responsibilities include supervision of students;

i. Possession or use of unauthorized substances, as defined by law or local school board policy;

j. Illegally occupying or blocking in any way school property with the intent to deprive others of its use;

k. Unlawful assembly;

l. Disrupting lawful assembly;

m. Other acts as determined by local school authorities.

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of disruptive conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the administrator should investigate the circumstances of the misconduct and should confer with staff on the extent of the consequences.

b. The administrator should notify the parent or guardian of the student's misconduct and related proceedings. The administrator should meet with the student and, if necessary, the parent or guardian, confer with them about the student's misconduct, and effect the appropriate disciplinary action.

c. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of disruptive conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Temporary removal from class;

b. Alternative education program;

c. In-school suspension;

d. Out-of-school suspension;

e. Transfer;

f. Referral to outside agency;

g. Expulsion;

h. Restitution of property and damages, where appropriate, should be sought by local school authorities;

i. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

C. Criminal Conduct-Level III

1. Criminal conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which result in violence to oneself or another's person or property or which pose a direct and serious threat to the safety of oneself or others in the school. These activities usually require administrative actions which result in the immediate removal of the student from the school, the intervention of law enforcement authorities, and/or action by the local school board. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within-school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of criminal conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Assault and battery;

b. Extortion;

c. Bomb threat;

d. Possession, use, or transfer of dangerous weapons;

e. Sexual offenses;

f. Vandalism (major);

g. Theft, possession, or sale of stolen property;

h. Arson;

i. Furnishing or selling unauthorized substances, as defined by local school board policy;

j. Furnishing, selling, or possession of controlled substances (drugs, narcotics, or poisons).

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of criminal conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the administrator should confer with the staff involved, should effect the appropriate disciplinary action, and, if appropriate, should meet with the student.

b. If warranted, the student should be removed immediately from the school environment. A parent or guardian should be notified as soon as possible.

c. If appropriate, school officials should contact law enforcement authorities.

d. Established due process procedures shall be followed when applicable.

e. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of criminal conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Out-of-school suspension;

b. Assignment to alternative schools;

c. Expulsion;

d. Restitution of property and damages, where appropriate, should be sought by local school authorities;

e. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

D. Extenuating, Mitigating or Aggravating Circumstances. A local school board may confer upon the appropriate administrator the authority to consider extenuating, mitigating or aggravating circumstances which may exist in a particular case of misconduct. Such circumstances should be considered in determining the most appropriate sanction to be used.

V. Discipline of Students with Disabilities

For additional information regarding Disciplinary Procedures for students with disabilities, see R 43-243.

VI. Other Areas of Student Conduct Which May Be Regulated by Local School Board Policy

A. Other areas of student conduct which are subject to regulation by local school boards include, but are not limited to:

1. School attendance;

2. Use of and access to public school property;

3. Student dress and personal appearance;

4. Use of tobacco in the public schools;

5. Speech and assembly within the public schools;

6. Publications produced and/or distributed in the public schools;

7. The existence, scope and conditions of availability of student privileges, including extracurricular activities and rules governing participation;

8. Other activities not in conflict with existing state statutes or regulations.

B. Other areas of student conduct may be regulated within legal limits by local school boards as they deem appropriate to local conditions. The term "legal limits" signifies the requirements of the federal and state constitutions and governing statutes, standards and regulations, the fundamental common-law requirement that rules of student conduct be reasonable exercises of the school's authority in pursuance of legitimate educational and related functions, and special limitations arising from constitutional guarantees.

Sub Category
Communication of policy
Statute

LAWS

59-5-65. Powers and responsibilities of State Board of Education.

The State Board of Education shall have the power and responsibility to:

(15) Develop by regulation a model safe schools checklist to be used by school districts on a regular basis to assess their schools' safety strengths and weaknesses. The checklist must include:

(a) the existence of a comprehensive safety plan;

(b) communication of discipline policies and procedures;

(c) intraagency and interagency emergency planning;

(d) recording of disruptive incidents;

(e) training of staff and students;

(f) assessment of buildings and grounds;

(g) procedures for handling visitors;

(h) assignment of personnel in emergencies;

(i) emergency communication and management procedures; and

(j) transportation rules and accident procedures.

(16) consult with the Department of Agricultural Education of Clemson University at all steps in the development of any state plan prepared to satisfy any federal requirement related to the Carl Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology and Education Act or any successor federal law, including, but not limited to, the allocation or distribution of funds under this federal act.

59-63-140. Local school districts to adopt policies prohibiting harassment; required components; model policies by State Board of Education; bullying prevention programs.

(D) The local school board shall ensure that the school district's policy developed pursuant to this article is included in the school district's publication of the comprehensive rules, procedures, and standards of conduct for schools and in the student's handbook.

59-63-1160. Posting of notice; costs of notice to be paid by State; effect of failure to post notice.

Notice must be conspicuously posted on school property informing the provisions of this article. The notice must be posted at least at all regular entrances and any other access point to the school grounds.

The costs of posting the notice required by this section must be paid by the State. No school or school district shall be required to incur any financial obligation for complying with the notice requirements contained in this section. The failure to post the notice provided in this section shall not constitute a defense to any civil action or criminal prosecution and shall not constitute grounds for any legal liability.

REGULATIONS

R43-166. Student and school safety.

A. School Safety Assessment

1. The State Department of Education shall develop a Model Safe Schools Checklist designed to assess schools' safety strengths and weaknesses. The checklist must include items addressing the following topics:

a. the existence of a comprehensive safety plan;

b. communication of discipline policies and procedures;

c. intra-agency and interagency emergency planning;

d. recording of disruptive incidents;

e. training of staff and students;

f. assessment of buildings and grounds;

g. procedures for handling visitors;

h. assignment of personnel in emergencies;

i. emergency communication and management procedures; and

j. transportation rules and accident procedures.

2. The State Department of Education shall submit the checklist to the State Board of Education for approval prior to dissemination to the school districts. The checklist may be revised on an annual basis by the State Board of Education in compliance with relevant provisions of the Safe Schools Act of 1990.

3. Prior to September 30 of each school year, the State Department of Education shall disseminate a copy of the model safe schools checklist to every public school district in the state.

4. School districts shall be advised by the Department of Education of the requirement to use a safe schools checklist in compliance with Section 59-5-65, S.C. Code of Laws, 1976. This safety assessment should be part of the comprehensive needs assessment conducted for school improvement purposes in compliance with Section 59-20-60(4)(d), S.C. Code of Laws, 1976. In particular, a safe schools check list should be utilized in determining "school climate" needs, one of the six indicators of school effectiveness.

B. First Aid Supplies. Each school shall provide adequate first aid supplies and equipment.

C. Support for Authorities. The Board urges all citizens to continue their active and vigorous support of the local school and civil authorities in insuring the personal safety and security of all students and teachers.

D. Emergency and Disaster Plans. A plan shall be designed to provide for the protection and welfare of students in the event of any disaster (tornado, hurricane, fire, etc.) which threatens to involve the school community. Each school shall conduct at least one emergency drill within the first month of school to insure safety against such disasters.

E. Guidelines will be developed by the State Department of Education which will refer to statutory provisions relating to school safety, as well as additional information. The State Department of Education will review and update these guidelines as needed.

Major Category
In-School Discipline
Sub Category
Use of multi-tiered discipline approaches
Statute

LAWS

No relevant laws found.

REGULATIONS

R43-279. Minimum Standards of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Enforcement Procedures to be Implemented by Local School Districts.

I. Expectations for Student Conduct in South Carolina Public Schools

Students in the public schools of South Carolina enjoy the same basic rights of United States citizenship as do other United States citizens. The rights of students are supported by the responsibility to insure that the rights of others are respected. This regulation is adopted with the intent to better assure that the opportunity to enjoy the benefits of public education is available to all those attending the public schools of the state of South Carolina.

II. Previously Adopted School District Discipline Policies

This regulation is established as a uniform system of minimum disciplinary enforcement for the school districts of South Carolina. School districts, which previously have adopted discipline policies that are consistent with and contain the elements included in this regulation, may retain their local policies as adopted.

III. Levels of Student Misconduct

A. The levels of student misconduct considered in this regulation are arranged by degrees of seriousness. The levels are arranged from the least serious to the most serious.

B. Three levels of student misconduct are identified: disorderly conduct, disruptive conduct, and criminal conduct. The levels are defined in this regulation.

C. This regulation includes a listing of possible sanctions for the three levels of student misconduct. As the levels increase in seriousness, the severity of possible disciplinary sanctions increases.

D. Suggested sanctions within the Level I misconduct category range from verbal reprimand to in-school suspension. Level II misconduct includes sanctions ranging from temporary removal from class to expulsion, while Level III misconduct includes sanctions ranging from out-of-school suspension to appropriate action within the criminal justice system.

E. A local school board, in its discretion, may authorize more stringent standards than those contained in this regulation.

IV. Minimum Standards

A. Disorderly Conduct-Level I

1. Disorderly conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which tend to impede orderly classroom procedures or instructional activities, orderly operation of the school, or the frequency or seriousness of which disturb the classroom or school. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within-school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of disorderly conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Classroom tardiness;

b. Cheating on examinations or classroom assignments;

c. Lying;

d. Acting in a manner so as to interfere with the instructional process;

e. Abusive language between or among students;

f. Failure to complete assignments or carry out directions;

g. Use of forged notes or excuses;

h. Cutting class;

i. School tardiness;

j. Truancy;

k. Other disorderly acts as determined by local school authorities.

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of disorderly conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the staff member should take immediate action to rectify the misconduct. The staff member should apply an appropriate sanction, and should maintain a record of the misconduct and the sanction.

b. If, either in the opinion of the staff member or according to local school board policy, a certain misconduct is not immediately rectifiable, the problem should be referred to the appropriate administrator for action specified by local school board policy.

c. The administrator should meet with the reporting staff member, and, if necessary, the student and the parent or guardian, and should effect the appropriate disciplinary action.

d. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of disorderly conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Verbal reprimand;

b. Withdrawal of privileges;

c. Demerits;

d. Detention;

e. Corporal punishment;

f. In-school suspension;

g. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

B. Disruptive Conduct-Level II

1. Disruptive conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which are directed against persons or property, and the consequences of which tend to endanger the health or safety of oneself or others in the school. Some instances of disruptive conduct may overlap certain criminal offenses, justifying both administrative sanctions and court proceedings. Disorderly conduct (Level I) may be reclassified as disruptive conduct (Level II) if it occurs three or more times. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of disruptive conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Use of an intoxicant;

b. Fighting;

c. Vandalism (minor);

d. Stealing;

e. Threats against others;

f. Trespass;

g. Abusive language to staff;

h. Refusal to obey school personnel or agents (such as volunteer aides or chaperones) whose responsibilities include supervision of students;

i. Possession or use of unauthorized substances, as defined by law or local school board policy;

j. Illegally occupying or blocking in any way school property with the intent to deprive others of its use;

k. Unlawful assembly;

l. Disrupting lawful assembly;

m. Other acts as determined by local school authorities.

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of disruptive conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the administrator should investigate the circumstances of the misconduct and should confer with staff on the extent of the consequences.

b. The administrator should notify the parent or guardian of the student's misconduct and related proceedings. The administrator should meet with the student and, if necessary, the parent or guardian, confer with them about the student's misconduct, and effect the appropriate disciplinary action.

c. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of disruptive conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Temporary removal from class;

b. Alternative education program;

c. In-school suspension;

d. Out-of-school suspension;

e. Transfer;

f. Referral to outside agency;

g. Expulsion;

h. Restitution of property and damages, where appropriate, should be sought by local school authorities;

i. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

C. Criminal Conduct-Level III

1. Criminal conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which result in violence to oneself or another's person or property or which pose a direct and serious threat to the safety of oneself or others in the school. These activities usually require administrative actions which result in the immediate removal of the student from the school, the intervention of law enforcement authorities, and/or action by the local school board. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within-school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of criminal conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Assault and battery;

b. Extortion;

c. Bomb threat;

d. Possession, use, or transfer of dangerous weapons;

e. Sexual offenses;

f. Vandalism (major);

g. Theft, possession, or sale of stolen property;

h. Arson;

i. Furnishing or selling unauthorized substances, as defined by local school board policy;

j. Furnishing, selling, or possession of controlled substances (drugs, narcotics, or poisons).

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of criminal conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the administrator should confer with the staff involved, should effect the appropriate disciplinary action, and, if appropriate, should meet with the student.

b. If warranted, the student should be removed immediately from the school environment. A parent or guardian should be notified as soon as possible.

c. If appropriate, school officials should contact law enforcement authorities.

d. Established due process procedures shall be followed when applicable.

e. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of criminal conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Out-of-school suspension;

b. Assignment to alternative schools;

c. Expulsion;

d. Restitution of property and damages, where appropriate, should be sought by local school authorities;

e. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

D. Extenuating, Mitigating or Aggravating Circumstances. A local school board may confer upon the appropriate administrator the authority to consider extenuating, mitigating or aggravating circumstances which may exist in a particular case of misconduct. Such circumstances should be considered in determining the most appropriate sanction to be used.

V. Discipline of Students with Disabilities

For additional information regarding Disciplinary Procedures for students with disabilities, see R 43-243.

VI. Other Areas of Student Conduct Which May Be Regulated by Local School Board Policy

A. Other areas of student conduct which are subject to regulation by local school boards include, but are not limited to:

1. School attendance;

2. Use of and access to public school property;

3. Student dress and personal appearance;

4. Use of tobacco in the public schools;

5. Speech and assembly within the public schools;

6. Publications produced and/or distributed in the public schools;

7. The existence, scope and conditions of availability of student privileges, including extracurricular activities and rules governing participation;

8. Other activities not in conflict with existing state statutes or regulations.

B. Other areas of student conduct may be regulated within legal limits by local school boards as they deem appropriate to local conditions. The term "legal limits" signifies the requirements of the federal and state constitutions and governing statutes, standards and regulations, the fundamental common-law requirement that rules of student conduct be reasonable exercises of the school's authority in pursuance of legitimate educational and related functions, and special limitations arising from constitutional guarantees.

Sub Category
Teacher authority to remove students from classrooms
Statute

No relevant laws or regulations found.

Sub Category
Alternatives to suspension
Statute

LAWS

59-63-250. Transfer of pupils.

The board or a designated administrator may transfer a pupil to another school in lieu of suspension or expulsion but only after a conference or hearing with the parents or legal guardian. The parents or legal guardian may appeal a transfer made by an administrator to the board.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Use of corporal punishment
Statute

LAWS

59-63-260. Corporal punishment.

The governing body of each school district may provide corporal punishment for any pupil that it deems just and proper.

REGULATIONS

R43-279. Minimum Standards of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Enforcement Procedures to be Implemented by Local School Districts. [SC ADC 43-279]

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of disorderly conduct may include, but are not limited to:

e. Corporal punishment;

Sub Category
Use of student and locker searches
Statute

LAWS

59-63-1110. Consent to search person or his effects.

Any person entering the premises of any school in this State shall be deemed to have consented to a reasonable search of his person and effects.

59-63-1120. Searches by school administrators or officials with or without probable cause.

Notwithstanding any other provision of law, school administrators and officials may conduct reasonable searches on school property of lockers, desks, vehicles, and personal belongings such as purses, bookbags, wallets, and satchels with or without probable cause.

59-63-1130. Searches by principals or their designees.

Notwithstanding any other provision of law, school principals or their designees may conduct reasonable searches of the person and property of visitors on school premises.

59-63-1140. Strip searches prohibited.

No school administrator or official may conduct a strip search.

59-63-1150. Compliance with case law; training of school administrators.

Notwithstanding any other provision of this article, all searches conducted pursuant to this article must comply fully with the "reasonableness standard" set forth in New Jersey v. T.L.O., 469 U.S. 328 (1985). All school administrators must receive training in the "reasonableness standard" under existing case law and in district procedures established to be followed in conducting searches of persons entering the school premises and of the students attending the school.

59-63-1160. Posting of notice; costs of notice to be paid by State; effect of failure to post notice.

Notice must be conspicuously posted on school property informing the provisions of this article. The notice must be posted at least at all regular entrances and any other access point to the school grounds.

The costs of posting the notice required by this section must be paid by the State. No school or school district shall be required to incur any financial obligation for complying with the notice requirements contained in this section. The failure to post the notice provided in this section shall not constitute a defense to any civil action or criminal prosecution and shall not constitute grounds for any legal liability.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Other in-school disciplinary approaches
Statute

LAWS

No relevant laws found.

REGULATIONS

R43-279. Minimum Standards of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Enforcement Procedures to be Implemented by Local School Districts.

I. Expectations for Student Conduct in South Carolina Public Schools

Students in the public schools of South Carolina enjoy the same basic rights of United States citizenship as do other United States citizens. The rights of students are supported by the responsibility to insure that the rights of others are respected. This regulation is adopted with the intent to better assure that the opportunity to enjoy the benefits of public education is available to all those attending the public schools of the state of South Carolina.

II. Previously Adopted School District Discipline Policies

This regulation is established as a uniform system of minimum disciplinary enforcement for the school districts of South Carolina. School districts, which previously have adopted discipline policies that are consistent with and contain the elements included in this regulation, may retain their local policies as adopted.

III. Levels of Student Misconduct

A. The levels of student misconduct considered in this regulation are arranged by degrees of seriousness. The levels are arranged from the least serious to the most serious.

B. Three levels of student misconduct are identified: disorderly conduct, disruptive conduct, and criminal conduct. The levels are defined in this regulation.

C. This regulation includes a listing of possible sanctions for the three levels of student misconduct. As the levels increase in seriousness, the severity of possible disciplinary sanctions increases.

D. Suggested sanctions within the Level I misconduct category range from verbal reprimand to in-school suspension. Level II misconduct includes sanctions ranging from temporary removal from class to expulsion, while Level III misconduct includes sanctions ranging from out-of-school suspension to appropriate action within the criminal justice system.

E. A local school board, in its discretion, may authorize more stringent standards than those contained in this regulation.

IV. Minimum Standards

A. Disorderly Conduct-Level I

1. Disorderly conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which tend to impede orderly classroom procedures or instructional activities, orderly operation of the school, or the frequency or seriousness of which disturb the classroom or school. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within-school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of disorderly conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Classroom tardiness;

b. Cheating on examinations or classroom assignments;

c. Lying;

d. Acting in a manner so as to interfere with the instructional process;

e. Abusive language between or among students;

f. Failure to complete assignments or carry out directions;

g. Use of forged notes or excuses;

h. Cutting class;

i. School tardiness;

j. Truancy;

k. Other disorderly acts as determined by local school authorities.

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of disorderly conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the staff member should take immediate action to rectify the misconduct. The staff member should apply an appropriate sanction, and should maintain a record of the misconduct and the sanction.

b. If, either in the opinion of the staff member or according to local school board policy, a certain misconduct is not immediately rectifiable, the problem should be referred to the appropriate administrator for action specified by local school board policy.

c. The administrator should meet with the reporting staff member, and, if necessary, the student and the parent or guardian, and should effect the appropriate disciplinary action.

d. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of disorderly conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Verbal reprimand;

b. Withdrawal of privileges;

c. Demerits;

d. Detention;

e. Corporal punishment;

f. In-school suspension;

g. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

B. Disruptive Conduct-Level II

1. Disruptive conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which are directed against persons or property, and the consequences of which tend to endanger the health or safety of oneself or others in the school. Some instances of disruptive conduct may overlap certain criminal offenses, justifying both administrative sanctions and court proceedings. Disorderly conduct (Level I) may be reclassified as disruptive conduct (Level II) if it occurs three or more times. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of disruptive conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Use of an intoxicant;

b. Fighting;

c. Vandalism (minor);

d. Stealing;

e. Threats against others;

f. Trespass;

g. Abusive language to staff;

h. Refusal to obey school personnel or agents (such as volunteer aides or chaperones) whose responsibilities include supervision of students;

i. Possession or use of unauthorized substances, as defined by law or local school board policy;

j. Illegally occupying or blocking in any way school property with the intent to deprive others of its use;

k. Unlawful assembly;

l. Disrupting lawful assembly;

m. Other acts as determined by local school authorities.

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of disruptive conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the administrator should investigate the circumstances of the misconduct and should confer with staff on the extent of the consequences.

b. The administrator should notify the parent or guardian of the student's misconduct and related proceedings. The administrator should meet with the student and, if necessary, the parent or guardian, confer with them about the student's misconduct, and effect the appropriate disciplinary action.

c. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of disruptive conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Temporary removal from class;

b. Alternative education program;

c. In-school suspension;

d. Out-of-school suspension;

e. Transfer;

f. Referral to outside agency;

g. Expulsion;

h. Restitution of property and damages, where appropriate, should be sought by local school authorities;

i. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

C. Criminal Conduct-Level III

1. Criminal conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which result in violence to oneself or another's person or property or which pose a direct and serious threat to the safety of oneself or others in the school. These activities usually require administrative actions which result in the immediate removal of the student from the school, the intervention of law enforcement authorities, and/or action by the local school board. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within-school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of criminal conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Assault and battery;

b. Extortion;

c. Bomb threat;

d. Possession, use, or transfer of dangerous weapons;

e. Sexual offenses;

f. Vandalism (major);

g. Theft, possession, or sale of stolen property;

h. Arson;

i. Furnishing or selling unauthorized substances, as defined by local school board policy;

j. Furnishing, selling, or possession of controlled substances (drugs, narcotics, or poisons).

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of criminal conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the administrator should confer with the staff involved, should effect the appropriate disciplinary action, and, if appropriate, should meet with the student.

b. If warranted, the student should be removed immediately from the school environment. A parent or guardian should be notified as soon as possible.

c. If appropriate, school officials should contact law enforcement authorities.

d. Established due process procedures shall be followed when applicable.

e. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of criminal conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Out-of-school suspension;

b. Assignment to alternative schools;

c. Expulsion;

d. Restitution of property and damages, where appropriate, should be sought by local school authorities;

e. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

D. Extenuating, Mitigating or Aggravating Circumstances. A local school board may confer upon the appropriate administrator the authority to consider extenuating, mitigating or aggravating circumstances which may exist in a particular case of misconduct. Such circumstances should be considered in determining the most appropriate sanction to be used.

V. Discipline of Students with Disabilities

For additional information regarding Disciplinary Procedures for students with disabilities, see R 43-243. VI. Other Areas of Student Conduct Which May Be Regulated by Local School Board Policy

A. Other areas of student conduct which are subject to regulation by local school boards include, but are not limited to:

1. School attendance;

2. Use of and access to public school property;

3. Student dress and personal appearance;

4. Use of tobacco in the public schools;

5. Speech and assembly within the public schools;

6. Publications produced and/or distributed in the public schools;

7. The existence, scope and conditions of availability of student privileges, including extracurricular activities and rules governing participation;

8. Other activities not in conflict with existing state statutes or regulations.

B. Other areas of student conduct may be regulated within legal limits by local school boards as they deem appropriate to local conditions. The term "legal limits" signifies the requirements of the federal and state constitutions and governing statutes, standards and regulations, the fundamental common-law requirement that rules of student conduct be reasonable exercises of the school's authority in pursuance of legitimate educational and related functions, and special limitations arising from constitutional guarantees.

Major Category
Out-of-School and Exclusionary Discipline: Suspension,Expulsion, Restraint and Seclusion, and Alternative Placements
Sub Category
Grounds for possible suspension or expulsion
Statute

LAWS

59-63-210. Grounds for which trustees may expel, suspend or transfer pupils; petition for readmission; expulsion, suspension, or transfer.

(A) Any district board of trustees may authorize or order the expulsion, suspension, or transfer of any pupil for the commission of any crime, gross immorality, gross misbehavior, persistent disobedience, or for violation of written rules and promulgated regulations established by the district board, county board, or the State Board of Education, or when the presence of the pupil is detrimental to the best interest of the school. Each expelled pupil has the right to petition for readmission for the succeeding school year. Expulsion or suspension must be construed to prohibit a pupil from entering the school or school grounds, except for a prearranged conference with an administrator, attending any day or night school functions, or riding a school bus. The provisions of this section do not preclude enrollment and attendance in any adult or night school.

(B) A district board of trustees shall not authorize or order the expulsion, suspension, or transfer of any pupil for a violation of Section 59-150-250(B).

REGULATIONS

R43-279. Minimum Standards of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Enforcement Procedures to be Implemented by Local School Districts.

I. Expectations for Student Conduct in South Carolina Public Schools

Students in the public schools of South Carolina enjoy the same basic rights of United States citizenship as do other United States citizens. The rights of students are supported by the responsibility to insure that the rights of others are respected. This regulation is adopted with the intent to better assure that the opportunity to enjoy the benefits of public education is available to all those attending the public schools of the state of South Carolina.

II. Previously Adopted School District Discipline Policies

This regulation is established as a uniform system of minimum disciplinary enforcement for the school districts of South Carolina. School districts, which previously have adopted discipline policies that are consistent with and contain the elements included in this regulation, may retain their local policies as adopted.

III. Levels of Student Misconduct

A. The levels of student misconduct considered in this regulation are arranged by degrees of seriousness. The levels are arranged from the least serious to the most serious.

B. Three levels of student misconduct are identified: disorderly conduct, disruptive conduct, and criminal conduct. The levels are defined in this regulation.

C. This regulation includes a listing of possible sanctions for the three levels of student misconduct. As the levels increase in seriousness, the severity of possible disciplinary sanctions increases.

D. Suggested sanctions within the Level I misconduct category range from verbal reprimand to in-school suspension. Level II misconduct includes sanctions ranging from temporary removal from class to expulsion, while Level III misconduct includes sanctions ranging from out-of-school suspension to appropriate action within the criminal justice system.

E. A local school board, in its discretion, may authorize more stringent standards than those contained in this regulation.

IV. Minimum Standards

A. Disorderly Conduct-Level I

1. Disorderly conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which tend to impede orderly classroom procedures or instructional activities, orderly operation of the school, or the frequency or seriousness of which disturb the classroom or school. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within-school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of disorderly conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Classroom tardiness;

b. Cheating on examinations or classroom assignments;

c. Lying;

d. Acting in a manner so as to interfere with the instructional process;

e. Abusive language between or among students;

f. Failure to complete assignments or carry out directions;

g. Use of forged notes or excuses;

h. Cutting class;

i. School tardiness;

j. Truancy;

k. Other disorderly acts as determined by local school authorities.

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of disorderly conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the staff member should take immediate action to rectify the misconduct. The staff member should apply an appropriate sanction, and should maintain a record of the misconduct and the sanction.

b. If, either in the opinion of the staff member or according to local school board policy, a certain misconduct is not immediately rectifiable, the problem should be referred to the appropriate administrator for action specified by local school board policy.

c. The administrator should meet with the reporting staff member, and, if necessary, the student and the parent or guardian, and should effect the appropriate disciplinary action.

d. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of disorderly conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Verbal reprimand;

b. Withdrawal of privileges;

c. Demerits;

d. Detention;

e. Corporal punishment;

f. In-school suspension;

g. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

B. Disruptive Conduct-Level II

1. Disruptive conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which are directed against persons or property, and the consequences of which tend to endanger the health or safety of oneself or others in the school. Some instances of disruptive conduct may overlap certain criminal offenses, justifying both administrative sanctions and court proceedings. Disorderly conduct (Level I) may be reclassified as disruptive conduct (Level II) if it occurs three or more times. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of disruptive conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Use of an intoxicant;

b. Fighting;

c. Vandalism (minor);

d. Stealing;

e. Threats against others;

f. Trespass;

g. Abusive language to staff;

h. Refusal to obey school personnel or agents (such as volunteer aides or chaperones) whose responsibilities include supervision of students;

i. Possession or use of unauthorized substances, as defined by law or local school board policy;

j. Illegally occupying or blocking in any way school property with the intent to deprive others of its use;

k. Unlawful assembly;

l. Disrupting lawful assembly;

m. Other acts as determined by local school authorities.

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of disruptive conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the administrator should investigate the circumstances of the misconduct and should confer with staff on the extent of the consequences.

b. The administrator should notify the parent or guardian of the student's misconduct and related proceedings. The administrator should meet with the student and, if necessary, the parent or guardian, confer with them about the student's misconduct, and effect the appropriate disciplinary action.

c. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of disruptive conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Temporary removal from class;

b. Alternative education program;

c. In-school suspension;

d. Out-of-school suspension;

e. Transfer;

f. Referral to outside agency;

g. Expulsion;

h. Restitution of property and damages, where appropriate, should be sought by local school authorities;

i. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

C. Criminal Conduct-Level III

1. Criminal conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which result in violence to oneself or another's person or property or which pose a direct and serious threat to the safety of oneself or others in the school. These activities usually require administrative actions which result in the immediate removal of the student from the school, the intervention of law enforcement authorities, and/or action by the local school board. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within-school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of criminal conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Assault and battery;

b. Extortion;

c. Bomb threat;

d. Possession, use, or transfer of dangerous weapons;

e. Sexual offenses;

f. Vandalism (major);

g. Theft, possession, or sale of stolen property;

h. Arson;

i. Furnishing or selling unauthorized substances, as defined by local school board policy;

j. Furnishing, selling, or possession of controlled substances (drugs, narcotics, or poisons).

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of criminal conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the administrator should confer with the staff involved, should effect the appropriate disciplinary action, and, if appropriate, should meet with the student.

b. If warranted, the student should be removed immediately from the school environment. A parent or guardian should be notified as soon as possible.

c. If appropriate, school officials should contact law enforcement authorities.

d. Established due process procedures shall be followed when applicable.

e. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of criminal conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Out-of-school suspension;

b. Assignment to alternative schools;

c. Expulsion;

d. Restitution of property and damages, where appropriate, should be sought by local school authorities;

e. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

D. Extenuating, Mitigating or Aggravating Circumstances. A local school board may confer upon the appropriate administrator the authority to consider extenuating, mitigating or aggravating circumstances which may exist in a particular case of misconduct. Such circumstances should be considered in determining the most appropriate sanction to be used.

Sub Category
Grounds for mandatory suspension or expulsion
Statute

LAWS

59-63-235. Expulsion of student determined to have brought firearm to school.

The district board must expel for no less than one year a student who is determined to have brought a firearm to a school or any setting under the jurisdiction of a local board of trustees. The expulsion must follow the procedures established pursuant to Section 59-63-240. The one-year expulsion is subject to modification by the district superintendent of education on a case-by-case basis. Students expelled pursuant to this section are not precluded from receiving educational services in an alternative setting. Each local board of trustees is to establish a policy which requires the student to be referred to the local county office of the Department of Juvenile Justice or its representative.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Limitations, conditions, or exclusions for use of suspension and expulsion
Statute

LAWS

59-63-210. Grounds for which trustees may expel, suspend or transfer pupils; petition for readmission; expulsion, suspension, or transfer.

(A) Any district board of trustees may authorize or order the expulsion, suspension, or transfer of any pupil for the commission of any crime, gross immorality, gross misbehavior, persistent disobedience, or for violation of written rules and promulgated regulations established by the district board, county board, or the State Board of Education, or when the presence of the pupil is detrimental to the best interest of the school. Each expelled pupil has the right to petition for readmission for the succeeding school year. Expulsion or suspension must be construed to prohibit a pupil from entering the school or school grounds, except for a prearranged conference with an administrator, attending any day or night school functions, or riding a school bus. The provisions of this section do not preclude enrollment and attendance in any adult or night school.

(B) A district board of trustees shall not authorize or order the expulsion, suspension, or transfer of any pupil for a violation of Section 59-150-250(B).

59-63-220. Suspension of pupils by administrator.

Any district board may confer upon any administrator the authority to suspend a pupil from a teacher's class or from the school not in excess of ten days for any one offense and for not more than thirty days in any one school year but no such administrator may suspend a pupil from school during the last ten days of a year if the suspension will make the pupil ineligible to receive credit for the school year without the approval of the school board unless the presence of the pupil constitutes an actual threat to a class or a school or a hearing is granted within twenty four hours of the suspension.

59-63-1330. Discretion of school board.

Nothing in this article shall abrogate the authority of any public school district and its governing board to take such disciplinary action as it is otherwise empowered by law to take against any student for misconduct including, but not limited to, expulsion, and nothing in this chapter shall require that any student be assigned to such an alternative school. These decisions shall rest solely in the discretion of the district and school board, regardless of the offense, record of the child, or other information presented from any source.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Administrative procedures related to suspension and expulsion
Statute

LAWS

59-63-210. Grounds for which trustees may expel, suspend or transfer pupils; petition for readmission; expulsion, suspension, or transfer.

Any district board of trustees may authorize or order the expulsion, suspension, or transfer of any pupil for a commission of any crime, gross misbehavior, persistent disobedience, or for violation of written rules and regulations established by the district board, county board, or the State Board of Education, or when the presence of the pupil is detrimental to the best interest of the school. Every expelled pupil shall have the right to petition for readmission for the succeeding school year. Expulsion or suspension shall be construed to prohibit a pupil from entering the school, or school grounds, except for a prearranged conference with an administrator, attending any day or night school functions or riding a school bus. The provisions of this section shall not preclude enrollment and attendance in any adult or night school.

59-63-220. Suspension of pupils by administrators.

Any district board may confer upon any administrator the authority to suspend a pupil from a teacher's class or from the school not in excess of ten days for any one offense and for not more than thirty days in any one school year but no such administrator may suspend a pupil from school during the last ten days of a year if the suspension will make the pupil ineligible to receive credit for the school year without the approval of the school board unless the presence of the pupil constitutes an actual threat to a class or a school or a hearing is granted within twenty-four hours of the suspension.

59-63-230. Notices of suspensions; conferences with parents or guardian.

When a pupil is suspended from a class or a school, the administrator shall notify, in writing, the parents or legal guardian of the pupil, giving the reason for such suspension and setting a time and place when the administrator shall be available for a conference with the parents or guardian. The conference shall be set within three days of the date of the suspension. After the conference the parents or legal guardian may appeal the suspension to the board of trustees or to its authorized agent.

59-63-240. Expulsion for remainder of year; hearings.

The board may expel for the remainder of the school year a pupil for any of the reasons listed in Section 59-63-210. If procedures for expulsion are initiated, the parents or legal guardian of the pupil shall be notified in writing of the time and the place of a hearing either before the board or a person or committee designated by the board. At the hearing the parents or legal guardian shall have the right to legal counsel and to all other regular legal rights including the right to question all witnesses. If the hearing is held by any authority other than the board of trustees, the right to appeal the decision to the board is reserved to either party. The hearing shall take place within fifteen days of the written notification at a time and place designated by the board and a decision shall be rendered within ten days of the hearing. The pupil may be suspended from school and all school activities during the time of the expulsion procedures. The action of the board may be appealed to the proper court. The board may permanently expel any incorrigible pupil.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
In-school suspension
Statute

LAWS

No relevant laws found.

REGULATIONS

R43-279. Minimum Standards of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Enforcement Procedures to be Implemented by Local School Districts.

I. Expectations for Student Conduct in South Carolina Public Schools

Students in the public schools of South Carolina enjoy the same basic rights of United States citizenship as do other United States citizens. The rights of students are supported by the responsibility to insure that the rights of others are respected. This regulation is adopted with the intent to better assure that the opportunity to enjoy the benefits of public education is available to all those attending the public schools of the state of South Carolina.

II. Previously Adopted School District Discipline Policies

This regulation is established as a uniform system of minimum disciplinary enforcement for the school districts of South Carolina. School districts, which previously have adopted discipline policies that are consistent with and contain the elements included in this regulation, may retain their local policies as adopted.

III. Levels of Student Misconduct

A. The levels of student misconduct considered in this regulation are arranged by degrees of seriousness. The levels are arranged from the least serious to the most serious.

B. Three levels of student misconduct are identified: disorderly conduct, disruptive conduct, and criminal conduct. The levels are defined in this regulation.

C. This regulation includes a listing of possible sanctions for the three levels of student misconduct. As the levels increase in seriousness, the severity of possible disciplinary sanctions increases.

D. Suggested sanctions within the Level I misconduct category range from verbal reprimand to in-school suspension. Level II misconduct includes sanctions ranging from temporary removal from class to expulsion, while Level III misconduct includes sanctions ranging from out-of-school suspension to appropriate action within the criminal justice system.

E. A local school board, in its discretion, may authorize more stringent standards than those contained in this regulation.

IV. Minimum Standards

A. Disorderly Conduct-Level I

1. Disorderly conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which tend to impede orderly classroom procedures or instructional activities, orderly operation of the school, or the frequency or seriousness of which disturb the classroom or school. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within-school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of disorderly conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Classroom tardiness;

b. Cheating on examinations or classroom assignments;

c. Lying;

d. Acting in a manner so as to interfere with the instructional process;

e. Abusive language between or among students;

f. Failure to complete assignments or carry out directions;

g. Use of forged notes or excuses;

h. Cutting class;

i. School tardiness;

j. Truancy;

k. Other disorderly acts as determined by local school authorities.

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of disorderly conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the staff member should take immediate action to rectify the misconduct. The staff member should apply an appropriate sanction, and should maintain a record of the misconduct and the sanction.

b. If, either in the opinion of the staff member or according to local school board policy, a certain misconduct is not immediately rectifiable, the problem should be referred to the appropriate administrator for action specified by local school board policy.

c. The administrator should meet with the reporting staff member, and, if necessary, the student and the parent or guardian, and should effect the appropriate disciplinary action.

d. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of disorderly conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Verbal reprimand;

b. Withdrawal of privileges;

c. Demerits;

d. Detention;

e. Corporal punishment;

f. In-school suspension;

g. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

B. Disruptive Conduct-Level II

1. Disruptive conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which are directed against persons or property, and the consequences of which tend to endanger the health or safety of oneself or others in the school. Some instances of disruptive conduct may overlap certain criminal offenses, justifying both administrative sanctions and court proceedings. Disorderly conduct (Level I) may be reclassified as disruptive conduct (Level II) if it occurs three or more times. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of disruptive conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Use of an intoxicant;

b. Fighting;

c. Vandalism (minor);

d. Stealing;

e. Threats against others;

f. Trespass;

g. Abusive language to staff;

h. Refusal to obey school personnel or agents (such as volunteer aides or chaperones) whose responsibilities include supervision of students;

i. Possession or use of unauthorized substances, as defined by law or local school board policy;

j. Illegally occupying or blocking in any way school property with the intent to deprive others of its use;

k. Unlawful assembly;

l. Disrupting lawful assembly;

m. Other acts as determined by local school authorities.

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of disruptive conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the administrator should investigate the circumstances of the misconduct and should confer with staff on the extent of the consequences.

b. The administrator should notify the parent or guardian of the student's misconduct and related proceedings. The administrator should meet with the student and, if necessary, the parent or guardian, confer with them about the student's misconduct, and effect the appropriate disciplinary action.

c. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of disruptive conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Temporary removal from class;

b. Alternative education program;

c. In-school suspension;

d. Out-of-school suspension;

e. Transfer;

f. Referral to outside agency;

g. Expulsion;

h. Restitution of property and damages, where appropriate, should be sought by local school authorities;

i. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

C. Criminal Conduct-Level III

1. Criminal conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which result in violence to oneself or another's person or property or which pose a direct and serious threat to the safety of oneself or others in the school. These activities usually require administrative actions which result in the immediate removal of the student from the school, the intervention of law enforcement authorities, and/or action by the local school board. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within-school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of criminal conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Assault and battery;

b. Extortion;

c. Bomb threat;

d. Possession, use, or transfer of dangerous weapons;

e. Sexual offenses;

f. Vandalism (major);

g. Theft, possession, or sale of stolen property;

h. Arson;

i. Furnishing or selling unauthorized substances, as defined by local school board policy;

j. Furnishing, selling, or possession of controlled substances (drugs, narcotics, or poisons).

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of criminal conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the administrator should confer with the staff involved, should effect the appropriate disciplinary action, and, if appropriate, should meet with the student.

b. If warranted, the student should be removed immediately from the school environment. A parent or guardian should be notified as soon as possible.

c. If appropriate, school officials should contact law enforcement authorities.

d. Established due process procedures shall be followed when applicable.

e. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of criminal conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Out-of-school suspension;

b. Assignment to alternative schools;

c. Expulsion;

d. Restitution of property and damages, where appropriate, should be sought by local school authorities;

e. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

D. Extenuating, Mitigating or Aggravating Circumstances. A local school board may confer upon the appropriate administrator the authority to consider extenuating, mitigating or aggravating circumstances which may exist in a particular case of misconduct. Such circumstances should be considered in determining the most appropriate sanction to be used.

V. Discipline of Handicapped Students

For additional information regarding Disciplinary Procedures for students with disabilities, see R 43-243.

VI. Other Areas of Student Conduct Which May Be Regulated by Local School Board Policy

A. Other areas of student conduct which are subject to regulation by local school boards include, but are not limited to:

1. School attendance;

2. Use of and access to public school property;

3. Student dress and personal appearance;

4. Use of tobacco in the public schools;

5. Speech and assembly within the public schools;

6. Publications produced and/or distributed in the public schools;

7. The existence, scope and conditions of availability of student privileges, including extracurricular activities and rules governing participation;

8. Other activities not in conflict with existing state statutes or regulations.

B. Other areas of student conduct may be regulated within legal limits by local school boards as they deem appropriate to local conditions. The term "legal limits" signifies the requirements of the federal and state constitutions and governing statutes, standards and regulations, the fundamental common-law requirement that rules of student conduct be reasonable exercises of the school's authority in pursuance of legitimate educational and related functions, and special limitations arising from constitutional guarantees.

Sub Category
Return to school following removal
Statute

LAWS

59-63-210. Grounds for which trustees may expel, suspend or transfer pupils; petition for readmission; expulsion, suspension, or transfer.

(A) Any district board of trustees may authorize or order the expulsion, suspension, or transfer of any pupil for the commission of any crime, gross immorality, gross misbehavior, persistent disobedience, or for violation of written rules and promulgated regulations established by the district board, county board, or the State Board of Education, or when the presence of the pupil is detrimental to the best interest of the school. Each expelled pupil has the right to petition for readmission for the succeeding school year. Expulsion or suspension must be construed to prohibit a pupil from entering the school or school grounds, except for a prearranged conference with an administrator, attending any day or night school functions, or riding a school bus. The provisions of this section do not preclude enrollment and attendance in any adult or night school.

(B) A district board of trustees shall not authorize or order the expulsion, suspension, or transfer of any pupil for a violation of Section 59-150-250(B).

59-63-217. Barring enrollment of student; grounds; notice and hearing; duration of bar.

(A) In determining whether or not a student meets the standards of conduct and behavior promulgated by the board of trustees necessary for first time enrollment and attendance in a school in the district, the board shall consider nonschool records, the student's disciplinary records in any school in which the student was previously enrolled as these records relate to the adjudication of delinquency in any jurisdiction, within or without this State, of violations or activities which constitute violent crimes under Section 16 1 60, adjudications for assault and battery of a high and aggravated nature, the unlawful use or possession of weapons, or the unlawful sale of drugs whether or not considered to be drug trafficking. Based on this consideration of the student's record, the board may bar his enrollment in the schools of the district.

(B) If the board bars a student from enrolling pursuant to this section, notice must be provided to the student's parent or legal guardian and the student is entitled to a hearing and all other procedural rights afforded under state law to a student subject to expulsion.

(C) The bar to enrollment allowed by this section applies for a maximum of one year. After the bar is lifted, a student may reapply for enrollment and the board shall order the student enrolled if he otherwise meets enrollment criteria.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Use of restraint and seclusion
Statute

No relevant laws or regulations found.

Sub Category
Alternative placements
Statute

LAWS

59-63-210. Grounds for which trustees may expel, suspend or transfer pupils; petition for readmission; expulsion, suspension, or transfer.

(A) Any district board of trustees may authorize or order the expulsion, suspension, or transfer of any pupil for the commission of any crime, gross immorality, gross misbehavior, persistent disobedience, or for violation of written rules and promulgated regulations established by the district board, county board, or the State Board of Education, or when the presence of the pupil is detrimental to the best interest of the school. Each expelled pupil has the right to petition for readmission for the succeeding school year. Expulsion or suspension must be construed to prohibit a pupil from entering the school or school grounds, except for a prearranged conference with an administrator, attending any day or night school functions, or riding a school bus. The provisions of this section do not preclude enrollment and attendance in any adult or night school.

(B) A district board of trustees shall not authorize or order the expulsion, suspension, or transfer of any pupil for a violation of Section 59-150-250(B).

59-63-1300. Alternative school programs established.

The General Assembly finds that a child who does not complete his education is greatly limited in obtaining employment, achieving his full potential, and becoming a productive member of society. It is, therefore, the intent of this article to encourage district school boards throughout the State to establish alternative school programs. These programs shall be designed to provide appropriate services to students who for behavioral or academic reasons are not benefiting from the regular school program or may be interfering with the learning of others. It is further the intent of this article that cooperative agreements may be developed among school districts in order to implement innovative exemplary programs.

59-63-1320. Referral or placement of students in alternative school programs.

Eligible alternative school programs shall be provided for, but not limited to, students in grades 6 12 as follows:

(1) Students referred for voluntary attendance at the alternative school program and meeting the district criteria to attend based upon a documented need for the attention and assistance beyond that of a traditional program as established by the academic history of the student, including the student's academic plan as required in Section 59 18 500, and following other policies and procedures for documenting need established by the district board of trustees.

(2) Students referred for voluntary attendance at the alternative school program and meeting the district criteria to attend based upon a documented need for the program due to habitual exhibitions of disruptive behavior in violation of the student conduct policies and behavior codes approved by the school board of trustees.

Districts must establish clear guidelines and procedures for the referral of any student into an alternative school program and before a decision is made to assign a student to an alternative school program, a determination must be made that the written and distributed academic and disciplinary policies of the district have been followed.

(3) Students placed in an alternative school program by the district board of trustees as an option to suspension or expulsion or by the dispositive order of a family court judge, with the consent of the local board of trustees. However, before a student may be placed in an alternative school program, a determination must be made by the local board that the written and distributed disciplinary policy of the district has been followed. Districts must establish clear guidelines and procedures for the placement of any student into an alternative school program and at a minimum they shall prescribe due process procedures for placement actions.

When students are being considered for placement in an alternative school program, districts must consider the requirements of the Federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

If a student placed by the board of trustees in an alternative school program enrolls in another school district before the expiration of the period of placement, the board of trustees of the district requiring the placement shall provide to the district in which the student enrolls, at the same time other records of the student are provided, information concerning the student's placement in an alternative school program. Upon review of the information, the district in which the student enrolls may continue an alternative education program placement or may allow the student to attend regular classes without completing the period of the placement.

59-63-1330. Discretion of school board.

Nothing in this article shall abrogate the authority of any public school district and its governing board to take such disciplinary action as it is otherwise empowered by law to take against any student for misconduct including, but not limited to, expulsion, and nothing in this chapter shall require that any student be assigned to such an alternative school. These decisions shall rest solely in the discretion of the district and school board, regardless of the offense, record of the child, or other information presented from any source.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Major Category
Disciplinary Approaches Addressing Specific Infractions and Conditions
Sub Category
Firearms (as required by the Guns-Free Schools Act)
Statute

LAWS

16-23-420. Possession of firearm on school property; concealed weapon.

(A) It is unlawful for a person to possess a firearm of any kind on any premises or property owned, operated, or controlled by a private or public school, college, university, technical college, other post-secondary institution, or in any publicly owned building, without the express permission of the authorities in charge of the premises or property. The provisions of this subsection related to any premises or property owned, operated, or controlled by a private or public school, college, university, technical college, or other post-secondary institution, do not apply to a person who is authorized to carry a concealed weapon pursuant to Article 4, Chapter 31, Title 23 when the weapon remains inside an attended or locked motor vehicle and is secured in a closed glove compartment, closed console, closed trunk, or in a closed container secured by an integral fastener and transported in the luggage compartment of the vehicle."

(B) It is unlawful for a person to enter the premises or property described in subsection (A) and to display, brandish, or threaten others with a firearm.

(C) A person who violates the provisions of this section is guilty of a felony and, upon conviction, must be fined not more than five thousand dollars or imprisoned not more than five years, or both.

(D) This section does not apply to a guard, law enforcement officer, or member of the armed forces, or student of military science. A married student residing in an apartment provided by the private or public school whose presence with a weapon in or around a particular building is authorized by persons legally responsible for the security of the buildings is also exempted from the provisions of this section.

(E) For purposes of this section, the terms 'premises' and 'property' do not include state or locally owned or maintained roads, streets, or rights-of-way of them, running through or adjacent to premises or property owned, operated, or controlled by a private or public school, college, university, technical college, or other post-secondary institution, which are open full time to public vehicular traffic.

(F) This section does not apply to a person who is authorized to carry concealed weapons pursuant to Article 4, Chapter 31 of Title 23 when upon any premises, property, or building that is part of an interstate highway rest area facility."

16-23-460. Carrying concealed weapons; forfeiture of weapons.

Any person carrying a deadly weapon usually used for the infliction of personal injury concealed about his person is guilty of a misdemeanor, must forfeit to the county, or, if convicted in a municipal court, to the municipality the concealed weapon, and must be fined not less than two hundred dollars nor more than five hundred dollars or imprisoned not less than thirty days nor more than ninety days. Nothing herein contained may be construed to apply to (1) persons carrying concealed weapons upon their own premises or pursuant to and in compliance with Article 4 of Chapter 31 of Title 23, or (2) peace officers in the actual discharge of their duties. The provisions of this section do not apply to rifles, shotguns, dirks, slingshots, metal knuckles, or razors unless they are used with the intent to commit a crime or in furtherance of a crime.

59-63-235. Expulsion of student determined to have brought firearm to school.

The district board must expel for no less than one year a student who is determined to have brought a firearm to a school or any setting under the jurisdiction of a local board of trustees. The expulsion must follow the procedures established pursuant to Section 59-63-240. The one-year expulsion is subject to modification by the district superintendent of education on a case-by-case basis. Students expelled pursuant to this section are not precluded from receiving educational services in an alternative setting. Each local board of trustees is to establish a policy which requires the student to be referred to the local county office of the Department of Juvenile Justice or its representative.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Other weapons
Statute

LAWS

16-23-430. Carrying weapon on school property; concealed weapons.

(A) It shall be unlawful for any person, except state, county, or municipal law enforcement officers or personnel authorized by school officials, to carry on his person, while on any elementary or secondary school property, a knife, with a blade over two inches long, a blackjack, a metal pipe or pole, firearms, or any other type of weapon, device, or object which may be used to inflict bodily injury or death.

(B) This section does not apply to a person who is authorized to carry a concealed weapon pursuant to Article 4, Chapter 31, Title 23 when the weapon remains inside an attended or locked motor vehicle and is secured in a closed glove compartment, closed console, closed trunk, or in a closed container secured by an integral fastener and transported in the luggage compartment of the vehicle.

(C) A person who violates the provisions of this section is guilty of a felony and, upon conviction, must be fined not more than one thousand dollars or imprisoned not more than five years, or both. Any weapon or object used in violation of this section may be confiscated by the law enforcement division making the arrest."

16-23-460. Carrying concealed weapons; forfeiture of weapons.

Any person carrying a deadly weapon usually used for the infliction of personal injury concealed about his person is guilty of a misdemeanor, must forfeit to the county, or, if convicted in a municipal court, to the municipality the concealed weapon, and must be fined not less than two hundred dollars nor more than five hundred dollars or imprisoned not less than thirty days nor more than ninety days. Nothing herein contained may be construed to apply to (1) persons carrying concealed weapons upon their own premises or pursuant to and in compliance with Article 4 of Chapter 31 of Title 23, or (2) peace officers in the actual discharge of their duties. The provisions of this section do not apply to rifles, shotguns, dirks, slingshots, metal knuckles, or razors unless they are used with the intent to commit a crime or in furtherance of a crime.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Students with chronic disciplinary issues
Statute

LAWS

No relevant laws found.

REGULATIONS

R43-274.1. At-risk students.

II. At-Risk Student Indicators, Predictors, and Barriers

The South Carolina Education and Economic Development Act mandates the promulgation of State Board of Education regulations outlining specific objective criteria for districts to use in identifying students who may be poorly prepared for the next level of study or who are at risk of dropping out of school. The Act calls for these criteria to include diagnostic assessments for districts to use in order to identify the strengths and weaknesses of individual students in the core academic areas.

B. The following are among the specific behaviors and characteristics that school districts must consider as indicators, predictors, and barriers in identifying at-risk students:

4. having a history of discipline problems leading to suspension, expulsion, and/or probation;

III. At-Risk Student Model, Initiative, and Program Selection

By the 2007-08 school year each high school of the state must implement one or more model programs approved by the South Carolina Department of Education (SCDE).

Schools must select at-risk student models, initiatives, and programs that meet the needs of the at-risk populations to be served and must ensure that models, initiatives, and programs selected provide students with the opportunity to graduate with a high school diploma. The SCDE will provide an implementation document that will include a tiered matrix of approved evidence-based models, initiatives, and programs to facilitate the selection process in accordance with the Education and Economic Development Act requirements for implementing evidence-based models, initiatives, and programs. The document will also contain a more extensive list of indicators, predictors, and barriers as well as one-page descriptions for each evidence-based model, initiative, and program included in the matrix.

IV. Population and Model, Initiative, and Program Identification Parameters

Each high school either must implement a model, initiative, or program that is chosen from a list provided by the SCDE or must submit to the SCDE for approval a specific dropout prevention model, comprehensive initiative, or multifaceted program that it wants to use. High schools may explore and implement newly developed models with approval from the SCDE. One criterion for SCDE approval of any newly developed model will be evidence presented by the district and/or school that the model is centered in research-based dropout-prevention strategies.

A. Implementation efforts related to any model, initiative, or program (or combination of models, initiatives, and programs) must ensure that students are properly identified and provided timely, appropriate guidance and assistance and must ensure that no group is disproportionately represented.

B. When subpopulations are identified, high schools must ensure that these groups reflect the demographics of populations identified as at risk of dropping out of school.

C. When no subpopulations are identified, high schools implementing comprehensive initiatives will not have to address the disproportionate representation of any one group of students. In such cases, methods of determining the effectiveness of the at-risk initiative must be given careful consideration with regard to collecting data and preparing necessary reports.

D. Parental involvement must be part of final placement decisions in any model, initiative, or program where small groups of students are identified for services in a particular school or district.

E. The target population must reflect the demographics of the population identified in Section II, above, as being at risk of dropping out of school.

F. High schools must provide relevant data related to identifying the at-risk student population and to addressing the needs of these at-risk students as required for SCDE reports.

V. Building-Level Program Evaluation

A. Evaluation Criteria. All high schools must annually evaluate their dropout-prevention models, initiatives, and/or programs using, at a minimum, the following criteria:

1. an identification process, including (where appropriate and based on the particular model, initiative, or program) the number of at-risk students identified and the specific risk factors identified;

2. the extent of parental involvement in the school's dropout-prevention efforts;

3. the number of students served;

4. a formative assessment of strengths and weaknesses of the model, initiative, and/or program; and

5. a qualitative assessment of desired outcomes (see item B, immediately below).

B. Desired Outcomes. Schools should establish desired outcomes or performance criteria based on the specific needs of the at-risk population identified and on the nature and structure of the particular model, initiative, and/or program they are implementing. Examples of desired outcomes among the target population include, but are not limited to, the following:

1. decreased percentages of truancy, absenteeism, discipline problems, and retentions;

2. increases in students' grade point averages; and

3. increased percentages of students who are on grade level and students who graduate on time.

Model-, initiative-, and/or program-specific data and PowerSchoolTM data elements should be used to assess desired outcomes on the basis of specific evaluation criteria. The state's PowerSchoolTM data management system can be used to collect, sort, and report data related to each student's attendance record; age and grade level; gender; ethnicity; grade point average; and retention, truancy, and dropout status.

C. Teacher and/or counselor assessments may be used to provide supplemental anecdotal documentation and insights related to the effectiveness of the model, initiative, and/or program implemented. A district or school checklist may be beneficial in the evaluation process.

VI. Model, Initiative, and/or Program Evaluation and Assessment Reporting

All high schools must annually provide reports requested by the SCDE that relate to the implementation and effectiveness of models, initiatives, and/or programs addressing the needs of students at risk of dropping out of school. District and school report card contents must contain information on the disciplinary climate, promotion and retention ratios, dropout ratios, dropout reduction data, and attendance data. Districts and schools must be prepared to provide accurate and relevant data to the SCDE.

Sub Category
Attendance and truancy
Statute

LAWS

59-65-50. Nonattendance reported to court having jurisdiction of juveniles.

If the board of trustees of a school district or its designee is unable to obtain the school attendance of a child in the age group specified in Section 59-65-10, the board or its designee shall report such nonattendance in writing to the juvenile court or such other court in the county as may have jurisdiction of juveniles but exclusive of magistrate's courts notwithstanding the provisions of Section 22-3-540; provided, that no one except the board of trustees or its designee shall have the authority to institute the proceedings herein.

59-65-60. Procedure upon receipt by court of report of nonattendance.

(a) Upon receipt of such report, the court may forthwith order the appearance before such court of the responsible parent or guardian and if it deems necessary, the minor involved, for such action as the court may deem necessary to carry out the provisions of this article.

(b) The court may, after hearing upon ten days notice, order such parent or guardian to require such child to attend school and upon failure of such parent to comply with such order may punish such parent or guardian as by contempt, provided, that punishment for such contempt cannot exceed fifty dollars or thirty days imprisonment for each offense.

The procedure herein provided shall be alternative to the penalties provided in Section 59-65-20.

59-65-70. Court empowered to declare child delinquent.

If the court determines that the reported absence occurred without the knowledge, consent or connivance of the responsible parent or guardian or that a bona fide attempt has been made to control and keep the child in school, the court may declare such child to be a delinquent and subject to the provisions of law in such cases.

59-65-80. Enrollment or attendance of expelled or suspended child not authorized.

Nothing herein shall be construed as granting authority to require enrollment or attendance of a child who has been or may be expelled or suspended by the board of trustees of the district or any other person acting with authority from the board of trustees.

59-65-90. Rules and regulations.

The State Board of Education shall establish regulations defining lawful and unlawful absences beyond those specifically named in this article and additional regulations as are necessary for the orderly enrollment of pupils so as to provide for uniform dates of entrance. These regulations shall require: (1) that school officials shall immediately intervene to encourage the student's future attendance when the student has three consecutive unlawful absences or a total of five unlawful absences and (2) that the district board of trustees or its designee shall promptly approve or disapprove any student absence in excess of ten days. As used in this section, "intervene" means to identify the reasons for the child's continued absence and to develop a plan in conjunction with the student and his parent or guardian to improve his future attendance.

Provided, However, That nothing within this section shall interfere with the Board's authority to at any time refer a child to a truancy prevention program or to the court pursuant to Section 59-65-50.

REGULATIONS

R43-274. Student Attendance.

II. Truancy

The State Board of Education recognizes that truancy is primarily an educational issue and that all reasonable, educationally sound, corrective actions should be undertaken by the school district prior to resorting to the juvenile justice system.

(A) Truant. A child ages 6 to 17 years meets the definition of a truant when the child has three consecutive unlawful absences or a total of five unlawful absences.

(B) Habitual Truant. A "habitual" truant is a child age 12 to 17 years who fails to comply with the intervention plan developed by the school, the child, and the parent(s) or guardian(s) and who accumulates two or more additional unlawful absences. This child may need court intervention and an initial truancy petition may be filed. The written intervention plan, and documentation of non-compliance, must be attached to the truancy petition asking for court intervention.

(C) Chronic Truant. A "chronic" truant is a child ages 12 to 17 years who has been through the school intervention process, has reached the level of a "habitual" truant, has been referred to Family Court and placed on an order to attend school, and continues to accumulate unlawful absences. Should other community alternatives and referrals fail to remedy the attendance problem, the "chronic" truant may be referred to the Family Court for violation of a previous court order. All school intervention plans existing to this point for this child and family must accompany the Contempt of Court petition as well as a written recommendation from the school to the court on action the court should take.

III. Intervention Plans

(A) Each district must develop a policy relating to requirements for intervention. The district plan for improving students' attendance must be in accordance with any applicable statutes.

(B) Once a child is determined to be truant as defined in Section II(A), school officials must make every reasonable effort to meet with the parent(s) or guardian(s) to identify the reasons for the student's continued absence. These efforts should include telephone calls and home visits, both during and after normal business hours, as well as written messages and e-mails. School officials must develop a written "intervention plan" to address the student's continued absence in conjunction with the student and parent(s) or guardian(s).

(C) The intervention plan must include but is not limited to

(1) Designation of a person to lead the intervention team. The team leader may be someone from another agency.

(2) Reasons for the unlawful absences.

(3) Actions to be taken by the parent(s) or guardian(s) and student to resolve the causes of the unlawful absences.

(4) Documentation of referrals to appropriate service providers and, if available, alternative school and community-based programs.

(5) Actions to be taken by intervention team members.

(6) Actions to be taken in the event unlawful absences continue.

(7) Signature of the parent(s) or guardian(s) or evidence that attempts were made to involve the parents(s) or guardian(s).

(8) Documentation of involvement of team members.

(9) Guidelines for making revisions to the plan.

(D) School officials may utilize a team intervention approach. Team members may include representatives from social services, community mental health, substance abuse and prevention, and other persons the district deems appropriate to formulate the written intervention plans.

IV. Referrals and Judicial Intervention

At no time should a child ages 6 to 17 years be referred to the Family Court to be placed on an order to attend school prior to the written intervention planning being completed with the parent(s) or guardian(s) by the school. A consent order must not be used as an intervention plan from any local school or school district. Should the parent(s) or guardian(s) refuse to cooperate with the intervention planning to remedy the attendance problem, the school district has the authority to refer the student to Family Court in accordance with S.C. Code Ann. Section 59-65-50 (1990), and a report shall be filed against the parent(s) or guardian(s) with the Department of Social Services in compliance with S.C. Code Ann. Section 20-7-490 (2)(c)(Supp. 2002).

(A) Petition for a School Attendance Order. If the intervention plan is not successful and further inquiry by school officials fails to cause the truant student and/or parent(s) or guardian(s) to comply with the written intervention plan or if the student and/or parent(s) or guardian(s) refuses to participate in intervention and the student accumulates two or more additional unlawful absences, the student is considered an "habitual" truant. Each referral must include a copy of the plan and specify any corrective action regarding the student and/or the parent(s) or guardian(s) that the district recommends that the court adopt as well as any other available programs or alternatives identified by the school district. The intervention plan must be attached to the petition to the Family Court and served on the student and the parent(s) or guardian(s).

(B) Petition for Contempt of Court. Once a school attendance order has been issued by the Family Court and the student continues to accumulate unlawful absences, the student is considered to be a "chronic" truant and school officials may refer the case back to Family Court. The school and district must exhaust all reasonable alternatives prior to petitioning the Family Court to hold the student and/or the parent(s) or guardian(s) in contempt of court. Any petition for contempt of court must include a written report indicating the corrective actions that were attempted by the school district and what graduated sanctions or alternatives to incarceration are available to the court in the community. The school district must include in the written report its recommendation to the court should the student and/or parent(s) or guardian(s) be found in contempt of court.

V. Coordination with the South Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice

Each school district should coordinate with the local office of the South Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice to establish a system of graduated sanctions and alternatives to incarceration in truancy cases.

VI. Transfer of Plans

If a student transfers to another public school in South Carolina, intervention plans shall be forwarded to the receiving school. School officials will contact the parent(s) or guardian(s) and local team members to review the plan and revise as appropriate. Court ordered plans may be amended through application to the court.

VII. Approval of Absences in Excess of Ten Days and Approval of Credit

(A) The district board of trustees, or its designee, shall approve or disapprove any student's absence in excess of ten days, whether lawful, unlawful, or a combination thereof, for students in grades K-12. For the purpose of awarding credit for the year, school districts must approve or disapprove absences in excess of ten days regardless as to whether those absences are lawful, unlawful, or a combination of the two.

(B) In order to receive one Carnegie unit of credit, a student must be in attendance at least 120 hours, per unit, regardless of the number of days missed, or must demonstrate proficiency as determined by the local school district. This exception to the 120-hour requirement is to be administered by local school districts on a case-by-case basis and only for students who have excessive absences that have been approved by the local school board. General request for proficiency-based credit must be made through the process described in Regulation 43-234. Students whose absences are approved should be allowed to make up any work missed in order to satisfy this requirement. Local school boards should develop policies governing student absences giving appropriate consideration to unique situations that may arise within their districts when students do not meet the minimum attendance requirements. Therefore, districts should allow students, whose excessive absences are approved in part 1 of this section, to make-up work missed to satisfy this requirement.

Examples of make-up work may include

(1) after-school and/or weekend make-up programs that address both time and academic requirements of the course(s), or

(2) extended-year programs that address both time and academic requirements of the course(s). All make-up time and work must be completed within thirty days from the last day of the course(s). The district board of trustees or its designee may extend the time for student's completion of the requirements due to extenuating circumstances that include but are not limited to the student's medical condition, family emergencies, and other student academic requirements that are considered to be a maximum load. Make-up requirements that extend beyond thirty days due to extenuating circumstances must be completed prior to the beginning of the subsequent new year.

VIII. Reporting Requirements

The State Department of Education will develop and implement a standard reporting system for the adequate collection and reporting of truancy rates on a school-by-school basis.

IX. Guidelines

Additional information relating to the implementation of this regulation will be contained in State Department of Education Guidelines. The State Department of Education will review and update these guidelines as needed.

Sub Category
Substance use
Statute

LAWS

No relevant laws found.

REGULATIONS

R43-279. Minimum Standards of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Enforcement Procedures to be Implemented by Local School Districts.

I. Expectations for Student Conduct in South Carolina Public Schools

Students in the public schools of South Carolina enjoy the same basic rights of United States citizenship as do other United States citizens. The rights of students are supported by the responsibility to insure that the rights of others are respected. This regulation is adopted with the intent to better assure that the opportunity to enjoy the benefits of public education is available to all those attending the public schools of the state of South Carolina.

II. Previously Adopted School District Discipline Policies

This regulation is established as a uniform system of minimum disciplinary enforcement for the school districts of South Carolina. School districts, which previously have adopted discipline policies that are consistent with and contain the elements included in this regulation, may retain their local policies as adopted.

III. Levels of Student Misconduct

A. The levels of student misconduct considered in this regulation are arranged by degrees of seriousness. The levels are arranged from the least serious to the most serious.

B. Three levels of student misconduct are identified: disorderly conduct, disruptive conduct, and criminal conduct. The levels are defined in this regulation.

C. This regulation includes a listing of possible sanctions for the three levels of student misconduct. As the levels increase in seriousness, the severity of possible disciplinary sanctions increases.

D. Suggested sanctions within the Level I misconduct category range from verbal reprimand to in-school suspension. Level II misconduct includes sanctions ranging from temporary removal from class to expulsion, while Level III misconduct includes sanctions ranging from out-of-school suspension to appropriate action within the criminal justice system.

E. A local school board, in its discretion, may authorize more stringent standards than those contained in this regulation.

IV. Minimum Standards

A. Disorderly Conduct-Level I

1. Disorderly conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which tend to impede orderly classroom procedures or instructional activities, orderly operation of the school, or the frequency or seriousness of which disturb the classroom or school. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within-school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of disorderly conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Classroom tardiness;

b. Cheating on examinations or classroom assignments;

c. Lying;

d. Acting in a manner so as to interfere with the instructional process;

e. Abusive language between or among students;

f. Failure to complete assignments or carry out directions;

g. Use of forged notes or excuses;

h. Cutting class;

i. School tardiness;

j. Truancy;

k. Other disorderly acts as determined by local school authorities.

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of disorderly conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the staff member should take immediate action to rectify the misconduct. The staff member should apply an appropriate sanction, and should maintain a record of the misconduct and the sanction.

b. If, either in the opinion of the staff member or according to local school board policy, a certain misconduct is not immediately rectifiable, the problem should be referred to the appropriate administrator for action specified by local school board policy.

c. The administrator should meet with the reporting staff member, and, if necessary, the student and the parent or guardian, and should effect the appropriate disciplinary action.

d. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of disorderly conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Verbal reprimand;

b. Withdrawal of privileges;

c. Demerits;

d. Detention;

e. Corporal punishment;

f. In-school suspension;

g. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

B. Disruptive Conduct-Level II

1. Disruptive conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which are directed against persons or property, and the consequences of which tend to endanger the health or safety of oneself or others in the school. Some instances of disruptive conduct may overlap certain criminal offenses, justifying both administrative sanctions and court proceedings. Disorderly conduct (Level I) may be reclassified as disruptive conduct (Level II) if it occurs three or more times. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of disruptive conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Use of an intoxicant;

b. Fighting;

c. Vandalism (minor);

d. Stealing;

e. Threats against others;

f. Trespass;

g. Abusive language to staff;

h. Refusal to obey school personnel or agents (such as volunteer aides or chaperones) whose responsibilities include supervision of students;

i. Possession or use of unauthorized substances, as defined by law or local school board policy;

j. Illegally occupying or blocking in any way school property with the intent to deprive others of its use;

k. Unlawful assembly;

l. Disrupting lawful assembly;

m. Other acts as determined by local school authorities.

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of disruptive conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the administrator should investigate the circumstances of the misconduct and should confer with staff on the extent of the consequences.

b. The administrator should notify the parent or guardian of the student's misconduct and related proceedings. The administrator should meet with the student and, if necessary, the parent or guardian, confer with them about the student's misconduct, and effect the appropriate disciplinary action.

c. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of disruptive conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Temporary removal from class;

b. Alternative education program;

c. In-school suspension;

d. Out-of-school suspension;

e. Transfer;

f. Referral to outside agency;

g. Expulsion;

h. Restitution of property and damages, where appropriate, should be sought by local school authorities;

i. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

C. Criminal Conduct-Level III

1. Criminal conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which result in violence to oneself or another's person or property or which pose a direct and serious threat to the safety of oneself or others in the school. These activities usually require administrative actions which result in the immediate removal of the student from the school, the intervention of law enforcement authorities, and/or action by the local school board. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within-school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of criminal conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Assault and battery;

b. Extortion;

c. Bomb threat;

d. Possession, use, or transfer of dangerous weapons;

e. Sexual offenses;

f. Vandalism (major);

g. Theft, possession, or sale of stolen property;

h. Arson;

i. Furnishing or selling unauthorized substances, as defined by local school board policy;

j. Furnishing, selling, or possession of controlled substances (drugs, narcotics, or poisons).

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of criminal conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the administrator should confer with the staff involved, should effect the appropriate disciplinary action, and, if appropriate, should meet with the student.

b. If warranted, the student should be removed immediately from the school environment. A parent or guardian should be notified as soon as possible.

c. If appropriate, school officials should contact law enforcement authorities.

d. Established due process procedures shall be followed when applicable.

e. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of criminal conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Out-of-school suspension;

b. Assignment to alternative schools;

c. Expulsion;

d. Restitution of property and damages, where appropriate, should be sought by local school authorities;

e. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

D. Extenuating, Mitigating or Aggravating Circumstances. A local school board may confer upon the appropriate administrator the authority to consider extenuating, mitigating or aggravating circumstances which may exist in a particular case of misconduct. Such circumstances should be considered in determining the most appropriate sanction to be used.

Sub Category
Bullying, harassment, or hazing
Statute

LAWS

59-63-110. Citation of article.

This article may be cited as the 'Safe School Climate Act'.

59-63-120. Definitions.

As used in this article:

(1) 'Harassment, intimidation, or bullying' means a gesture, an electronic communication, or a written, verbal, physical, or sexual act that is reasonably perceived to have the effect of:

(a) harming a student physically or emotionally or damaging a student's property, or placing a student in reasonable fear of personal harm or property damage; or

(b) insulting or demeaning a student or group of students causing substantial disruption in, or substantial interference with, the orderly operation of the school.

(2) 'School' means in a classroom, on school premises, on a school bus or other school-related vehicle, at an official school bus stop, at a school-sponsored activity or event whether or not it is held on school premises, or at another program or function where the school is responsible for the child.

59-63-130. Prohibited conduct; reports by witnesses.

(A) A person may not engage in:

(1) harassment, intimidation, or bullying; or

(2) reprisal, retaliation, or false accusation against a victim, witness, or one with reliable information about an act of harassment, intimidation, or bullying.

(B) A school employee, student, or volunteer who witnesses, or has reliable information that a student has been subject to harassment, intimidation, or bullying shall report the incident to the appropriate school official.

59-63-140. Local school districts to adopt policies prohibiting harassment; required components; model policies by State Board of Education; bullying prevention programs.

(A) Before January 1, 2007, each local school district shall adopt a policy prohibiting harassment, intimidation, or bullying at school. The school district shall involve parents and guardians, school employees, volunteers, students, administrators, and community representatives in the process of creating the policy.

(B) The policy must include, but not be limited to, the following components:

(1) a statement prohibiting harassment, intimidation, or bullying of a student;

(2) a definition of harassment, intimidation, or bullying no less inclusive than the definition in 59-63-120;

(3) a description of appropriate student behavior;

(4) consequences and appropriate remedial actions for persons committing acts of harassment, intimidation, or bullying, and for persons engaging in reprisal or retaliation;

(5) procedures for reporting acts of harassment, intimidation, or bullying, to include a provision for reporting anonymously. However, formal disciplinary action must not be taken solely on the basis of an anonymous report. The procedures must identify the appropriate school personnel responsible for taking the report and investigating the complaint;

(6) procedures for prompt investigation of reports of serious violations and complaints;

(7) a statement that prohibits reprisal or retaliation against a person who reports an act of harassment, intimidation, or bullying;

(8) consequences and appropriate remedial action for persons found to have falsely accused another;

(9) a process for discussing the district's harassment, intimidation, or bullying policy with students; and

(10) a statement of how the policy is to be publicized, including notice that the policy applies to participation in school-sponsored functions.

(C) To assist local school districts in developing policies for the prevention of harassment, intimidation, or bullying, the State Board of Education shall develop model policies applicable to grades kindergarten through twelve. Additionally, the State Board of Education shall develop teacher preparation program standards on the identification and prevention of bullying. The model policies and standards must be developed no later than September 1, 2006.

(D) The local school board shall ensure that the school district's policy developed pursuant to this article is included in the school district's publication of the comprehensive rules, procedures, and standards of conduct for schools and in the student's handbook.

(E) Information regarding a local school district policy against harassment, intimidation, or bullying must be incorporated into a school's employee training program. Training also should be provided to school volunteers who have significant contact with students.

(F) Schools and school districts are encouraged to establish bullying prevention programs and other initiatives involving school staff, students, administrators, volunteers, parents, law enforcement, and community members.

59-63-150. Availability of civil or criminal redress; immunity of reporting school employee or volunteer.

(A) This article must not be interpreted to prevent a victim from seeking redress pursuant to another available civil or criminal law. This section does not create or alter tort liability.

(B) A school employee or volunteer who promptly reports an incident of harassment, intimidation, or bullying to the appropriate school official designated by the local school district's policy, and who makes this report in compliance with the procedures in the district's policy, is immune from a cause of action for damages arising from failure to remedy the reported incident."

59-63-210. Grounds for which trustees may expel, suspend or transfer pupils; petition for readmission; expulsion, suspension, or transfer.

(A) Any district board of trustees may authorize or order the expulsion, suspension, or transfer of any pupil for the commission of any crime, gross immorality, gross misbehavior, persistent disobedience, or for violation of written rules and promulgated regulations established by the district board, county board, or the State Board of Education, or when the presence of the pupil is detrimental to the best interest of the school. Each expelled pupil has the right to petition for readmission for the succeeding school year. Expulsion or suspension must be construed to prohibit a pupil from entering the school or school grounds, except for a prearranged conference with an administrator, attending any day or night school functions, or riding a school bus. The provisions of this section do not preclude enrollment and attendance in any adult or night school.

(B) A district board of trustees shall not authorize or order the expulsion, suspension, or transfer of any pupil for a violation of Section 59-150-250(B).

59-63-217. Barring enrollment of student; grounds; notice and hearing; duration of bar.

(A) In determining whether or not a student meets the standards of conduct and behavior promulgated by the board of trustees necessary for first time enrollment and attendance in a school in the district, the board shall consider nonschool records, the student's disciplinary records in any school in which the student was previously enrolled as these records relate to the adjudication of delinquency in any jurisdiction, within or without this State, of violations or activities which constitute violent crimes under Section 16-1-60, adjudications for assault and battery of a high and aggravated nature, the unlawful use or possession of weapons, or the unlawful sale of drugs whether or not considered to be drug trafficking. Based on this consideration of the student's record, the board may bar his enrollment in the schools of the district.

(B) If the board bars a student from enrolling pursuant to this section, notice must be provided to the student's parent or legal guardian and the student is entitled to a hearing and all other procedural rights afforded under state law to a student subject to expulsion.

(C) The bar to enrollment allowed by this section applies for a maximum of one year. After the bar is lifted, a student may reapply for enrollment and the board shall order the student enrolled if he otherwise meets enrollment criteria.

59-63-275. Student hazing prohibited; definitions.

(A) For purposes of this section:

(1) 'Student' means a person enrolled in a public education institution.

(2) 'Superior student' means a student who has attended a state university, college, or other public education institution longer than another student or who has an official position giving authority over another student.

(3) 'Subordinate student' means a person who attends a public education institution who is not defined as a 'superior student' in item (2).

(4) 'Hazing' means the wrongful striking, laying open hand upon, threatening with violence, or offering to do bodily harm by a superior student to a subordinate student with intent to punish or injure the subordinate student, or other unauthorized treatment by the superior student of a subordinate student of a tyrannical, abusive, shameful, insulting, or humiliating nature.

(B) Hazing at all public education institutions is prohibited. When an investigation has disclosed substantial evidence that a student has committed an act or acts of hazing, the student may be dismissed, expelled, suspended, or punished as the principal considers appropriate.

(C) The provisions of this section are in addition to the provisions of Article 6, Chapter 3 of Title 16.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Other special infractions or conditions
Statute

LAWS

59-63-270. Regulation or prohibition of clubs or like activities.

Any district board of trustees may regulate, control, or prohibit clubs or other such activities on school property or during school hours.

59-63-280. "Paging device" defined; adoption of policies addressing student possession.

(A) For purposes of this section, 'paging device' means a telecommunications, to include mobile telephones, device that emits an audible signal, vibrates, displays a message, or otherwise summons or delivers a communication to the possessor.

(B) The board of trustees of each school district shall adopt a policy that addresses student possession of paging devices as defined in subsection (A). This policy must be included in the district's written student conduct standards. If the policy includes confiscation of a paging device, as defined in subsection (A), it should also provide for the return of the device to the owner.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Major Category
Prevention and Behavioral Interventions (Non-Punitive)
Sub Category
Prevention
Statute

LAWS

59-17-135. Character education.

(A) The General Assembly finds:

(1) the schools of South Carolina must provide the safest environment possible for students to learn;

(2) teaching positive character traits is essential to improving the learning environment, promoting student achievement, reducing disciplinary problems, and developing civic-minded students;

(3) schools must be encouraged to instill the highest character and academic excellence in each student, in close cooperation with the student's parents; and

(4) elected officials, community and civic leaders, business leaders, religious institutions, youth organizations, government, media, and citizens-at-large must be encouraged to become actively involved in creating an atmosphere which encourages positive character development through every sector of the community.

(B) Each local school board of trustees of the State must develop a policy addressing character education. Any character education program implemented by a district as a result of an adopted policy must, to the extent possible, incorporate character traits including, but not limited to, the following: respect for authority and respect for others, honesty, self-control, cleanliness, courtesy, good manners, cooperation, citizenship, patriotism, courage, fairness, kindness, self-respect, compassion, diligence, good work ethics, sound educational habits, generosity, punctuality, cheerfulness, patience, sportsmanship, loyalty, and virtue. Local school boards must include all sectors of the community, as referenced in subsection (A)(4), in the development of a policy and in the development of any program implemented as a result of the policy. As part of any policy and program developed by the local school board, an evaluation component must be included.

(C) Beginning with the 2000-2001 school year, each school district board of trustees is encouraged to require students in the public schools under the jurisdiction of the board to exhibit appropriate conduct, as required in subsection (D) of this section.

(D) When a public school student is speaking with a public school employee while on school property or at a school sponsored event, the student may be encouraged to address and respond to the public school employee by using terms indicative of or reflecting courtesy and respect for a public school's employees position of authority including, but not limited to, sir, ma'am, thank you, and please.

(E) Each school district board of trustees is encouraged to provide for incorporation of the requirements of subsections (C) and (D) into any existing discipline policy or policies or any code of conduct of the school district or of each school within its jurisdiction.

(F) No school board may provide suspension or expulsion from school as an appropriate punishment for violation of subsection (D).

(G) Upon request, the State Department of Education must provide to the school districts of the State information on currently available programs, curriculums, and resources. In addition, the State Department of Education must provide to the school districts of the State information on best practices and successful programs currently being implemented.

59-63-140. Local school districts to adopt policies prohibiting harassment; required components; model policies by State Board of Education; bullying prevention programs.

(F) Schools and school districts are encouraged to establish bullying prevention programs and other initiatives involving school staff, students, administrators, volunteers, parents, law enforcement, and community members.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Behavioral interventions and student support services
Statute

LAWS

No relevant laws found.

REGULATIONS

R43-274.1. At-risk students.

II. At-Risk Student Indicators, Predictors, and Barriers

The South Carolina Education and Economic Development Act mandates the promulgation of State Board of Education regulations outlining specific objective criteria for districts to use in identifying students who may be poorly prepared for the next level of study or who are at risk of dropping out of school. The Act calls for these criteria to include diagnostic assessments for districts to use in order to identify the strengths and weaknesses of individual students in the core academic areas.

B. The following are among the specific behaviors and characteristics that school districts must consider as indicators, predictors, and barriers in identifying at-risk students:

4. having a history of discipline problems leading to suspension, expulsion, and/or probation;

III. At-Risk Student Model, Initiative, and Program Selection

By the 2007-08 school year each high school of the state must implement one or more model programs approved by the South Carolina Department of Education (SCDE).

Schools must select at-risk student models, initiatives, and programs that meet the needs of the at-risk populations to be served and must ensure that models, initiatives, and programs selected provide students with the opportunity to graduate with a high school diploma. The SCDE will provide an implementation document that will include a tiered matrix of approved evidence-based models, initiatives, and programs to facilitate the selection process in accordance with the Education and Economic Development Act requirements for implementing evidence-based models, initiatives, and programs. The document will also contain a more extensive list of indicators, predictors, and barriers as well as one-page descriptions for each evidence-based model, initiative, and program included in the matrix.

IV. Population and Model, Initiative, and Program Identification Parameters

Each high school either must implement a model, initiative, or program that is chosen from a list provided by the SCDE or must submit to the SCDE for approval a specific dropout prevention model, comprehensive initiative, or multifaceted program that it wants to use. High schools may explore and implement newly developed models with approval from the SCDE. One criterion for SCDE approval of any newly developed model will be evidence presented by the district and/or school that the model is centered in research-based dropout-prevention strategies.

A. Implementation efforts related to any model, initiative, or program (or combination of models, initiatives, and programs) must ensure that students are properly identified and provided timely, appropriate guidance and assistance and must ensure that no group is disproportionately represented.

B. When subpopulations are identified, high schools must ensure that these groups reflect the demographics of populations identified as at risk of dropping out of school.

C. When no subpopulations are identified, high schools implementing comprehensive initiatives will not have to address the disproportionate representation of any one group of students. In such cases, methods of determining the effectiveness of the at-risk initiative must be given careful consideration with regard to collecting data and preparing necessary reports.

D. Parental involvement must be part of final placement decisions in any model, initiative, or program where small groups of students are identified for services in a particular school or district.

E. The target population must reflect the demographics of the population identified in Section II, above, as being at risk of dropping out of school.

F. High schools must provide relevant data related to identifying the at-risk student population and to addressing the needs of these at-risk students as required for SCDE reports.

V. Building-Level Program Evaluation

A. Evaluation Criteria. All high schools must annually evaluate their dropout-prevention models, initiatives, and/or programs using, at a minimum, the following criteria:

1. an identification process, including (where appropriate and based on the particular model, initiative, or program) the number of at-risk students identified and the specific risk factors identified;

2. the extent of parental involvement in the school's dropout-prevention efforts;

3. the number of students served;

4. a formative assessment of strengths and weaknesses of the model, initiative, and/or program; and

5. a qualitative assessment of desired outcomes (see item B, immediately below).

B. Desired Outcomes. Schools should establish desired outcomes or performance criteria based on the specific needs of the at-risk population identified and on the nature and structure of the particular model, initiative, and/or program they are implementing. Examples of desired outcomes among the target population include, but are not limited to, the following:

1. decreased percentages of truancy, absenteeism, discipline problems, and retentions;

2. increases in students' grade point averages; and

3. increased percentages of students who are on grade level and students who graduate on time.

Model-, initiative-, and/or program-specific data and PowerSchoolTM data elements should be used to assess desired outcomes on the basis of specific evaluation criteria. The state's PowerSchoolTM data management system can be used to collect, sort, and report data related to each student's attendance record; age and grade level; gender; ethnicity; grade point average; and retention, truancy, and dropout status.

C. Teacher and/or counselor assessments may be used to provide supplemental anecdotal documentation and insights related to the effectiveness of the model, initiative, and/or program implemented. A district or school checklist may be beneficial in the evaluation process.

VI. Model, Initiative, and/or Program Evaluation and Assessment Reporting

All high schools must annually provide reports requested by the SCDE that relate to the implementation and effectiveness of models, initiatives, and/or programs addressing the needs of students at risk of dropping out of school. District and school report card contents must contain information on the disciplinary climate, promotion and retention ratios, dropout ratios, dropout reduction data, and attendance data. Districts and schools must be prepared to provide accurate and relevant data to the SCDE.

Sub Category
Professional development
Statute

LAWS

59-5-65. Powers and responsibilities of State Board of Education.

The State Board of Education shall have the power and responsibility to:

(15) Develop by regulation a model safe schools checklist to be used by school districts on a regular basis to assess their schools' safety strengths and weaknesses. The checklist must include:

(a) the existence of a comprehensive safety plan;

(b) communication of discipline policies and procedures;

(c) intraagency and interagency emergency planning;

(d) recording of disruptive incidents;

(e) training of staff and students;

(f) assessment of buildings and grounds;

(g) procedures for handling visitors;

(h) assignment of personnel in emergencies;

(i) emergency communication and management procedures; and

(j) transportation rules and accident procedures.

(16) consult with the Department of Agricultural Education of Clemson University at all steps in the development of any state plan prepared to satisfy any federal requirement related to the Carl Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology and Education Act or any successor federal law, including, but not limited to, the allocation or distribution of funds under this federal act.

59-63-140. Local school districts to adopt policies prohibiting harassment; required components; model policies by State Board of Education; bullying prevention programs.

(C) To assist local school districts in developing policies for the prevention of harassment, intimidation, or bullying, the State Board of Education shall develop model policies applicable to grades kindergarten through twelve. Additionally, the State Board of Education shall develop teacher preparation program standards on the identification and prevention of bullying. The model policies and standards must be developed no later than September 1, 2006.

(E) Information regarding a local school district policy against harassment, intimidation, or bullying must be incorporated into a school's employee training program. Training also should be provided to school volunteers who have significant contact with students.

59-63-1150. Compliance with case law; training of school administrators.

Notwithstanding any other provision of this article, all searches conducted pursuant to this article must comply fully with the "reasonableness standard" set forth in New Jersey v. T.L.O., 469 U.S. 328 (1985). All school administrators must receive training in the "reasonableness standard" under existing case law and in district procedures established to be followed in conducting searches of persons entering the school premises and of the students attending the school.

REGULATIONS

R43-166. Student and school safety.

A. School Safety Assessment

1. The State Department of Education shall develop a Model Safe Schools Checklist designed to assess schools' safety strengths and weaknesses. The checklist must include items addressing the following topics:

a. the existence of a comprehensive safety plan;

b. communication of discipline policies and procedures;

c. intra-agency and interagency emergency planning;

d. recording of disruptive incidents;

e. training of staff and students;

f. assessment of buildings and grounds;

g. procedures for handling visitors;

h. assignment of personnel in emergencies;

i. emergency communication and management procedures; and

j. transportation rules and accident procedures.

2. The State Department of Education shall submit the checklist to the State Board of Education for approval prior to dissemination to the school districts. The checklist may be revised on an annual basis by the State Board of Education in compliance with relevant provisions of the Safe Schools Act of 1990.

3. Prior to September 30 of each school year, the State Department of Education shall disseminate a copy of the model safe schools checklist to every public school district in the state.

4. School districts shall be advised by the Department of Education of the requirement to use a safe schools checklist in compliance with Section 59-5-65, S.C. Code of Laws, 1976. This safety assessment should be part of the comprehensive needs assessment conducted for school improvement purposes in compliance with Section 59-20-60(4)(d), S.C. Code of Laws, 1976. In particular, a safe schools check list should be utilized in determining "school climate" needs, one of the six indicators of school effectiveness.

B. First Aid Supplies

Each school shall provide adequate first aid supplies and equipment.

C. Support for Authorities

The Board urges all citizens to continue their active and vigorous support of the local school and civil authorities in insuring the personal safety and security of all students and teachers.

D. Emergency and Disaster Plans

A plan shall be designed to provide for the protection and welfare of students in the event of any disaster (tornado, hurricane, fire, etc.) which threatens to involve the school community. Each school shall conduct at least one emergency drill within the first month of school to insure safety against such disasters.

E. Guidelines will be developed by the State Department of Education which will refer to statutory provisions relating to school safety, as well as additional information. The State Department of Education will review and update these guidelines as needed.

Major Category
Monitoring and Accountability
Sub Category
Formal incident reporting of conduct violations
Statute

LAWS

59-63-320. Reporting form.

By December 31, 1990, the State Department of Education, after consultation with the State Law Enforcement Division, shall develop a standard school crime reporting form which must be used by all school districts in the State. The form must define what constitutes criminal activity required to be reported and must include, but is not limited to, the following:

(1) types and frequency of criminal incident;

(2) crimes against the person, including:

(a) description of crime;

(b) age and sex of offender and whether the offender is a student. If the offender is a student, whether he attended the school where the crime occurred or a different school, and whether he was under school suspension or expulsion at the time of the offense;

(c) age and sex of the victim and whether the victim is a student. If the victim is a student, whether he attended the school where the crime occurred or a different school. If the victim is not a student, whether he was employed at the school and, if so, in what capacity;

(d) where, at what time, and under what circumstances the incident occurred;

(e) the cost of the crime to the school and to the victim;

(f) what action was taken by the school administration;

(3) crimes against property, including:

(a) description of the crime;

(b) where, at what time, and under what circumstances the crime occurred;

(c) the cost of the crime to the school and to the victim;

(d) what action was taken by the school administration.

59-63-330. Quarterly and annual reports.

On forms prepared and supplied by the State Department of Education, each school district in the State shall report school related crime quarterly to the State Department of Education. The department shall compile the information received from the districts and annually, not later than January thirty first of the year following the districts' final quarterly reports of the school year, make a report to the General Assembly on the findings. In addition, the State Department of Education shall, upon receipt, forward all information concerning school related crime to the Attorney General's Office. This information shall be used by the Attorney General in the supervision of the prosecution of school crime.

59-63-333. School crime requirements to conform to federal "No Child Left Behind Act".

The State Department of Education shall conform the requirements of Sections 59 63 310 through 59 63 340 on school crime so as to fulfill the provisions of the 'No Child Left Behind Act of 2001' (20 U.S.C. Section 7912) which includes reports on persistently dangerous schools and on the frequency, seriousness, and incidence of violence and drug related offenses resulting in suspensions and expulsions in elementary and secondary schools. A summary of the provisions of Article 4, Chapter 63 of Title 59 required to be included in the school's student handbook each year must be revised to conform with the requirements of this section.

59-63-335. Failure of school administrator to report criminal conduct; liability.

Failure of a school administrator to report criminal conduct as set forth in Section 59 24 60 or failure to report information concerning school related crime pursuant to Section 59 63 330 shall subject the administrator and the school district to liability for payment of a party's attorney's fees and the costs associated with an action to seek a writ of mandamus to compel the administrator and school district to comply with Section 59 24 60 or 59 63 330.

59-63-380. School official reporting school-related crimes; immunity.

A person affiliated with a school in an official capacity is granted immunity from criminal prosecution and civil liability when making a report of school-related crime in good faith, to the extent that the exposure to criminal prosecution or civil liability arises from the same report of school-related crime.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Parental notification
Statute

LAWS

59-63-230. Notices of suspensions; conferences with parents or guardian.

When a pupil is suspended from a class or a school, the administrator shall notify, in writing, the parents or legal guardian of the pupil, giving the reason for such suspension and setting a time and place when the administrator shall be available for a conference with the parents or guardian. The conference shall be set within three days of the date of the suspension. After the conference the parents or legal guardian may appeal the suspension to the board of trustees or to its authorized agent.

59-63-240. Expulsion for remainder of year; hearings.

The board may expel for the remainder of the school year a pupil for any of the reasons listed in Section 59-63-210. If procedures for expulsion are initiated, the parents or legal guardian of the pupil shall be notified in writing of the time and the place of a hearing either before the board or a person or committee designated by the board. At the hearing the parents or legal guardian shall have the right to legal counsel and to all other regular legal rights including the right to question all witnesses. If the hearing is held by any authority other than the board of trustees, the right to appeal the decision to the board is reserved to either party. The hearing shall take place within fifteen days of the written notification at a time and place designated by the board and a decision shall be rendered within ten days of the hearing. The pupil may be suspended from school and all school activities during the time of the expulsion procedures. The action of the board may be appealed to the proper court. The board may permanently expel any incorrigible pupil.

59-65-260. Duties of attendance supervisor relating to nonattending children.

The attendance supervisor shall, upon receiving the list of nonattending children from the county superintendent of education, contact as rapidly as possible the parents or guardians of such nonattending children with the object in mind of interesting nonattending children in school work, and influencing them by means of persuasion to attend school regularly. All principals shall report to such attendance supervisor on continuous absences which appear to be unwarranted, and the attendance supervisor shall make an earnest effort to have enrolled and keep enrolled all children of school age in the county.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Reporting and referrals between schools and law enforcement
Statute

LAWS

59-63-320. Reporting form.

By December 31, 1990, the State Department of Education, after consultation with the State Law Enforcement Division, shall develop a standard school crime reporting form which must be used by all school districts in the State. The form must define what constitutes criminal activity required to be reported and must include, but is not limited to, the following:

(1) types and frequency of criminal incident;

(2) crimes against the person, including:

(a) description of crime;

(b) age and sex of offender and whether the offender is a student. If the offender is a student, whether he attended the school where the crime occurred or a different school, and whether he was under school suspension or expulsion at the time of the offense;

(c) age and sex of the victim and whether the victim is a student. If the victim is a student, whether he attended the school where the crime occurred or a different school. If the victim is not a student, whether he was employed at the school and, if so, in what capacity;

(d) where, at what time, and under what circumstances the incident occurred;

(e) the cost of the crime to the school and to the victim;

(f) what action was taken by the school administration;

(3) crimes against property, including:

(a) description of the crime;

(b) where, at what time, and under what circumstances the crime occurred;

(c) the cost of the crime to the school and to the victim;

(d) what action was taken by the school administration.

59-63-335. Failure of school administrator to report criminal conduct; liability.

Failure of a school administrator to report criminal conduct as set forth in Section 59 24 60 or failure to report information concerning school related crime pursuant to Section 59 63 330 shall subject the administrator and the school district to liability for payment of a party's attorney's fees and the costs associated with an action to seek a writ of mandamus to compel the administrator and school district to comply with Section 59 24 60 or 59 63 330.

59-63-350. Local law enforcement.

Local law enforcement officials are required to contact the Attorney General's "school safety phone line" when any felony, assault and battery of a high and aggravated nature, crime involving a weapon, or drug offense is committed on school property or at a school sanctioned or school sponsored activity or any crime reported pursuant to Section 59 24 60.

59-63-360. Attorney General; representation of school districts.

The Attorney General shall monitor all reported school crimes. The Attorney General or his designee may represent the local school district when a criminal case is appealed to an appellate court of competent jurisdiction.

59-63-380. School official reporting school related crimes; immunity.

A person affiliated with a school in an official capacity is granted immunity from criminal prosecution and civil liability when making a report of school related crime in good faith, to the extent that the exposure to criminal prosecution or civil liability arises from the same report of school related crime.

REGULATIONS

R43-279. Minimum Standards of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Enforcement Procedures to be Implemented by Local School Districts.

C. Criminal Conduct-Level III

1. Criminal conduct is defined as those activities engaged in by student(s) which result in violence to oneself or another's person or property or which pose a direct and serious threat to the safety of oneself or others in the school. These activities usually require administrative actions which result in the immediate removal of the student from the school, the intervention of law enforcement authorities, and/or action by the local school board. The provisions of this regulation apply not only to within-school activities, but also to student conduct on school bus transportation vehicles, and other school sponsored activities.

2. Acts of criminal conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Assault and battery;

b. Extortion;

c. Bomb threat;

d. Possession, use, or transfer of dangerous weapons;

e. Sexual offenses;

f. Vandalism (major);

g. Theft, possession, or sale of stolen property;

h. Arson;

i. Furnishing or selling unauthorized substances, as defined by local school board policy;

j. Furnishing, selling, or possession of controlled substances (drugs, narcotics, or poisons).

3. The basic enforcement procedures to be followed in instances of criminal conduct are:

a. Upon observation or notification and verification of an offense, the administrator should confer with the staff involved, should effect the appropriate disciplinary action, and, if appropriate, should meet with the student.

b. If warranted, the student should be removed immediately from the school environment. A parent or guardian should be notified as soon as possible.

c. If appropriate, school officials should contact law enforcement authorities.

d. Established due process procedures shall be followed when applicable.

e. A complete record of the procedures should be maintained.

4. Possible sanctions to be applied in cases of criminal conduct may include, but are not limited to:

a. Out-of-school suspension;

b. Assignment to alternative schools;

c. Expulsion;

d. Restitution of property and damages, where appropriate, should be sought by local school authorities;

e. Other sanctions as approved by local school authorities.

D. Extenuating, Mitigating or Aggravating Circumstances

A local school board may confer upon the appropriate administrator the authority to consider extenuating, mitigating or aggravating circumstances which may exist in a particular case of misconduct. Such circumstances should be considered in determining the most appropriate sanction to be used.

Sub Category
Disclosure of school records
Statute

LAWS

59-63-370. Student's conviction or delinquency adjudication for certain offenses; notification of senior administrator at student's school; placement of information in permanent school records.

Notwithstanding any other provision of law:

(1) When a student who is convicted of or adjudicated delinquent for assault and battery against school personnel, as defined in Section 16-3-612, assault and battery of a high and aggravated nature committed on school grounds or at a school-sponsored event against any person affiliated with the school in an official capacity, a violent offense as defined in Section 16-1-60, an offense in which a weapon as defined in Section 59-63-370 was used, or for distribution or trafficking in unlawful drugs as defined in Article 3, Chapter 53 of Title 44 is assigned to the Department of Juvenile Justice, the Department of Corrections, or to the Department of Probation, Parole, and Pardon Services, that agency is required to provide immediate notice of the student's conviction or adjudication to the senior administrator of the school in which the student is enrolled, intends to be enrolled, or was last enrolled. These agencies are authorized to request information concerning school enrollment from a student convicted of or adjudicated delinquent for an offense listed in this item.

(2) When a student convicted of or adjudicated delinquent for an offense listed in item (1) of this section is not sentenced to incarceration or probation, the presiding judge shall as part of his sentence order the clerk of the municipal, magistrate, or general sessions court to provide, within ten days, notification of the student's sentence to the appropriate school district for inclusion in the student's permanent record. If the student is under the jurisdiction of the family court and is not referred to the Department of Juvenile Justice, the prosecuting agency must provide notification within ten days to the appropriate school district.

(3) An administrator notified pursuant to this section is required to notify each teacher or instructor in whose class the student is enrolled of a student's conviction of or adjudication for an offense listed in item (1) of this section. This notification must be made to the appropriate teachers or instructors every year the student is enrolled in school.

(4) If a student is convicted of or adjudicated delinquent for an offense listed in item (1) of this section, information concerning the conviction or adjudication and sentencing must be placed in the student's permanent school record and must be forwarded with the student's permanent school records if the student transfers to another school or school district.

A "weapon", as used in this section, means a firearm, knife with a blade-length of over two inches, dirk, razor, metal knuckles, slingshot, bludgeon, or any other deadly instrument used for the infliction of bodily harm or death.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Data collection, review, and reporting of disciplinary policies and actions
Statute

LAWS

59-5-65. Powers and responsibilities of State Board of Education.

The State Board of Education shall have the power and responsibility to:

(15) Develop by regulation a model safe schools checklist to be used by school districts on a regular basis to assess their schools' safety strengths and weaknesses. The checklist must include:

(a) the existence of a comprehensive safety plan;

(b) communication of discipline policies and procedures;

(c) intraagency and interagency emergency planning;

(d) recording of disruptive incidents;

(e) training of staff and students;

(f) assessment of buildings and grounds;

(g) procedures for handling visitors;

(h) assignment of personnel in emergencies;

(i) emergency communication and management procedures; and

(j) transportation rules and accident procedures.

(16) consult with the Department of Agricultural Education of Clemson University at all steps in the development of any state plan prepared to satisfy any federal requirement related to the Carl Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology and Education Act or any successor federal law, including, but not limited to, the allocation or distribution of funds under this federal act.

59-63-333. School crime requirements to conform to federal "No Child Left Behind Act".

The State Department of Education shall conform the requirements of Sections 59-63-310 through 59-63-340 on school crime so as to fulfill the provisions of the 'No Child Left Behind Act of 2001' (20 U.S.C. Section 7912) which includes reports on persistently dangerous schools and on the frequency, seriousness, and incidence of violence and drug-related offenses resulting in suspensions and expulsions in elementary and secondary schools. A summary of the provisions of Article 4, Chapter 63 of Title 59 and Section 16-3-612 required to be included in the school's student handbook each year must be revised to conform with the requirements of this section.

59-63-360. Attorney General; representation of school districts.

The Attorney General shall monitor all reported school crimes. The Attorney General or his designee may represent the local school district when a criminal case is appealed to an appellate court of competent jurisdiction.

59-63-390. Inclusion of school crime report act summary in student handbooks.

The senior administrator of each school is responsible for including an accurate summary of the provisions of this article and Section 16-3-612 in the school's student handbook each year.

REGULATIONS

R43-166. Student and school safety.

A. School Safety Assessment

1. The State Department of Education shall develop a Model Safe Schools Checklist designed to assess schools' safety strengths and weaknesses. The checklist must include items addressing the following topics:

a. the existence of a comprehensive safety plan;

b. communication of discipline policies and procedures;

c. intra-agency and interagency emergency planning;

d. recording of disruptive incidents;

e. training of staff and students;

f. assessment of buildings and grounds;

g. procedures for handling visitors;

h. assignment of personnel in emergencies;

i. emergency communication and management procedures; and

j. transportation rules and accident procedures.

2. The State Department of Education shall submit the checklist to the State Board of Education for approval prior to dissemination to the school districts. The checklist may be revised on an annual basis by the State Board of Education in compliance with relevant provisions of the Safe Schools Act of 1990.

3. Prior to September 30 of each school year, the State Department of Education shall disseminate a copy of the model safe schools checklist to every public school district in the state.

4. School districts shall be advised by the Department of Education of the requirement to use a safe schools checklist in compliance with Section 59-5-65, S.C. Code of Laws, 1976. This safety assessment should be part of the comprehensive needs assessment conducted for school improvement purposes in compliance with Section 59-20-60(4)(d), S.C. Code of Laws, 1976. In particular, a safe schools check list should be utilized in determining "school climate" needs, one of the six indicators of school effectiveness.

B. First Aid Supplies

Each school shall provide adequate first aid supplies and equipment.

C. Support for Authorities

The Board urges all citizens to continue their active and vigorous support of the local school and civil authorities in insuring the personal safety and security of all students and teachers.

D. Emergency and Disaster Plans

A plan shall be designed to provide for the protection and welfare of students in the event of any disaster (tornado, hurricane, fire, etc.) which threatens to involve the school community. Each school shall conduct at least one emergency drill within the first month of school to insure safety against such disasters.

E. Guidelines will be developed by the State Department of Education which will refer to statutory provisions relating to school safety, as well as additional information. The State Department of Education will review and update these guidelines as needed.

Major Category
School Resource and Safety Officers (SROs/SSOs) and Truant/Attendance Officers
Sub Category
Authority and power to implement school arrest
Statute

LAWS

5-7-12. School resource officers; procedures for certain arrests; jurisdiction; employment rights.

(A) The governing body of a municipality or county may upon the request of another governing body or of another political subdivision of the State, including school districts, designate certain officers to be assigned to the duty of a school resource officer and to work within the school systems of the municipality or county. The person assigned as a school resource officer shall have statewide jurisdiction to arrest persons committing crimes in connection with a school activity or school-sponsored event. In all circumstances in which a school resource officer arrests a student for a misdemeanor offense, the officer may issue a courtesy summons to appear to a student involved in the particular incident in connection with a school activity or school-sponsored event. Notwithstanding another provision of law, a student arrested for a misdemeanor offense by a school resource officer must have a bond hearing in magistrates court within twenty-four hours of his arrest. When acting pursuant to this section and outside of the sworn municipality or county of the school resource officer, the officer shall enjoy all authority, rights, privileges, and immunities, including coverage under the workers' compensation laws that he would have enjoyed if operating in his sworn jurisdiction.

(B) For purposes of this section, a "school resource officer" is defined as a person who is a sworn law enforcement officer pursuant to the requirements of any jurisdiction of this State, who has completed the basic course of instruction for School Resource Officers as provided or recognized by the National Association of School Resource Officers or the South Carolina Criminal Justice Academy, and who is assigned to one or more school districts within this State to have as a primary duty the responsibility to act as a law enforcement officer, advisor, and teacher for that school district.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Certification or training
Statute

LAWS

5-7-12. School resource officers; procedures for certain arrests; jurisdiction; employment rights.

(A) The governing body of a municipality or county may upon the request of another governing body or of another political subdivision of the State, including school districts, designate certain officers to be assigned to the duty of a school resource officer and to work within the school systems of the municipality or county. The person assigned as a school resource officer shall have statewide jurisdiction to arrest persons committing crimes in connection with a school activity or school-sponsored event. In all circumstances in which a school resource officer arrests a student for a misdemeanor offense, the officer may issue a courtesy summons to appear to a student involved in the particular incident in connection with a school activity or school-sponsored event. Notwithstanding another provision of law, a student arrested for a misdemeanor offense by a school resource officer must have a bond hearing in magistrates court within twenty-four hours of his arrest. When acting pursuant to this section and outside of the sworn municipality or county of the school resource officer, the officer shall enjoy all authority, rights, privileges, and immunities, including coverage under the workers' compensation laws that he would have enjoyed if operating in his sworn jurisdiction.

(B) For purposes of this section, a "school resource officer" is defined as a person who is a sworn law enforcement officer pursuant to the requirements of any jurisdiction of this State, who has completed the basic course of instruction for School Resource Officers as provided or recognized by the National Association of School Resource Officers or the South Carolina Criminal Justice Academy, and who is assigned to one or more school districts within this State to have as a primary duty the responsibility to act as a law enforcement officer, advisor, and teacher for that school district.

59-65-230. Certification of attendance supervisors by State Board of Education.

Attendance supervisors shall be certified by the State Board of Education. Qualifications for the certification of attendance supervisors shall be determined by the State Board of Education in the same manner as the Board now determines qualifications for all other teachers, provided, that such certification requirements shall not adversely affect attendance supervisors who were employed prior to the passage of this article.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
MOUs, authorization, and/or funding
Statute

LAWS

5-7-12. School resource officers; procedures for certain arrests; jurisdiction; employment rights.

(A) The governing body of a municipality or county may upon the request of another governing body or of another political subdivision of the State, including school districts, designate certain officers to be assigned to the duty of a school resource officer and to work within the school systems of the municipality or county. The person assigned as a school resource officer shall have statewide jurisdiction to arrest persons committing crimes in connection with a school activity or school-sponsored event. In all circumstances in which a school resource officer arrests a student for a misdemeanor offense, the officer may issue a courtesy summons to appear to a student involved in the particular incident in connection with a school activity or school-sponsored event. Notwithstanding another provision of law, a student arrested for a misdemeanor offense by a school resource officer must have a bond hearing in magistrates court within twenty-four hours of his arrest. When acting pursuant to this section and outside of the sworn municipality or county of the school resource officer, the officer shall enjoy all authority, rights, privileges, and immunities, including coverage under the workers' compensation laws that he would have enjoyed if operating in his sworn jurisdiction.

(B) For purposes of this section, a "school resource officer" is defined as a person who is a sworn law enforcement officer pursuant to the requirements of any jurisdiction of this State, who has completed the basic course of instruction for School Resource Officers as provided or recognized by the National Association of School Resource Officers or the South Carolina Criminal Justice Academy, and who is assigned to one or more school districts within this State to have as a primary duty the responsibility to act as a law enforcement officer, advisor, and teacher for that school district.

59-65-210. State appropriation for attendance supervisor program.

For each county which has indicated a desire for the service of an attendance supervisor or supervisors there shall be appropriated annually for the ensuing fiscal year a sum sufficient to pay the salaries and expenses of an attendance supervisor or supervisors for each county, one such supervisor for each ten thousand children, or fraction thereof, enrolled in each county as of the closing date of the school year immediately preceding the commencing of each such fiscal year. This sum shall be the State's portion of the attendance supervisor program. Nothing in this article shall limit the number of attendance supervisors that a county or a school district may employ at its own expense.

59-65-220. Election of attendance supervisors.

In each county desiring the services of an attendance supervisor, such supervisor shall, if his salary and expenses are to be paid by the State, be elected on or before July first of each year, or as soon thereafter as practicable, by the members of the county board of education whose terms of office run concurrently with or extend beyond the period of employment of such supervisor.

59-65-250. Cooperation between attendance supervisors and county and district agencies and the like.

The county attendance supervisor whose salary shall be paid from State funds and such other attendance supervisors as may be employed by the county or school districts therein shall cooperate with the social and civic organizations and agencies of the county or district, as well as with the trustees of the several school districts in the county.

59-65-260. Duties of attendance supervisor relating to nonattending children.

The attendance supervisor shall, upon receiving the list of nonattending children from the county superintendent of education, contact as rapidly as possible the parents or guardians of such nonattending children with the object in mind of interesting nonattending children in school work, and influencing them by means of persuasion to attend school regularly. All principals shall report to such attendance supervisor on continuous absences which appear to be unwarranted, and the attendance supervisor shall make an earnest effort to have enrolled and keep enrolled all children of school age in the county.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Major Category
State Education Agency Support
Sub Category
State model policies and implementation support
Statute

LAWS

59-5-65. Powers and responsibilities of State Board of Education.

The State Board of Education shall have the power and responsibility to:

(15) Develop by regulation a model safe schools checklist to be used by school districts on a regular basis to assess their schools' safety strengths and weaknesses. The checklist must include:

(a) the existence of a comprehensive safety plan;

(b) communication of discipline policies and procedures;

(c) intraagency and interagency emergency planning;

(d) recording of disruptive incidents;

(e) training of staff and students;

(f) assessment of buildings and grounds;

(g) procedures for handling visitors;

(h) assignment of personnel in emergencies;

(i) emergency communication and management procedures; and

(j) transportation rules and accident procedures.

(16) consult with the Department of Agricultural Education of Clemson University at all steps in the development of any state plan prepared to satisfy any federal requirement related to the Carl Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology and Education Act or any successor federal law, including, but not limited to, the allocation or distribution of funds under this federal act.

59-63-140. Local school districts to adopt policies prohibiting harassment; required components; model policies by State Board of Education; bullying prevention programs.

(A) Before January 1, 2007, each local school district shall adopt a policy prohibiting harassment, intimidation, or bullying at school. The school district shall involve parents and guardians, school employees, volunteers, students, administrators, and community representatives in the process of creating the policy.

(B) The policy must include, but not be limited to, the following components:

(1) a statement prohibiting harassment, intimidation, or bullying of a student;

(2) a definition of harassment, intimidation, or bullying no less inclusive than the definition in Section 59 63 120;

(3) a description of appropriate student behavior;

(4) consequences and appropriate remedial actions for persons committing acts of harassment, intimidation, or bullying, and for persons engaging in reprisal or retaliation;

(5) procedures for reporting acts of harassment, intimidation, or bullying, to include a provision for reporting anonymously. However, formal disciplinary action must not be taken solely on the basis of an anonymous report. The procedures must identify the appropriate school personnel responsible for taking the report and investigating the complaint;

(6) procedures for prompt investigation of reports of serious violations and complaints;

(7) a statement that prohibits reprisal or retaliation against a person who reports an act of harassment, intimidation, or bullying;

(8) consequences and appropriate remedial action for persons found to have falsely accused another;

(9) a process for discussing the district's harassment, intimidation, or bullying policy with students; and

(10) a statement of how the policy is to be publicized, including notice that the policy applies to participation in school sponsored functions.

(C) To assist local school districts in developing policies for the prevention of harassment, intimidation, or bullying, the State Board of Education shall develop model policies applicable to grades kindergarten through twelve. Additionally, the State Board of Education shall develop teacher preparation program standards on the identification and prevention of bullying. The model policies and standards must be developed no later than September 1, 2006.

(D) The local school board shall ensure that the school district's policy developed pursuant to this article is included in the school district's publication of the comprehensive rules, procedures, and standards of conduct for schools and in the student's handbook.

(E) Information regarding a local school district policy against harassment, intimidation, or bullying must be incorporated into a school's employee training program. Training also should be provided to school volunteers who have significant contact with students.

(F) Schools and school districts are encouraged to establish bullying prevention programs and other initiatives involving school staff, students, administrators, volunteers, parents, law enforcement, and community members.

REGULATIONS

R43-166. Student and school safety.

A. School Safety Assessment

1. The State Department of Education shall develop a Model Safe Schools Checklist designed to assess schools' safety strengths and weaknesses. The checklist must include items addressing the following topics:

a. the existence of a comprehensive safety plan;

b. communication of discipline policies and procedures;

c. intra-agency and interagency emergency planning;

d. recording of disruptive incidents;

e. training of staff and students;

f. assessment of buildings and grounds;

g. procedures for handling visitors;

h. assignment of personnel in emergencies;

i. emergency communication and management procedures; and

j. transportation rules and accident procedures.

2. The State Department of Education shall submit the checklist to the State Board of Education for approval prior to dissemination to the school districts. The checklist may be revised on an annual basis by the State Board of Education in compliance with relevant provisions of the Safe Schools Act of 1990.

3. Prior to September 30 of each school year, the State Department of Education shall disseminate a copy of the model safe schools checklist to every public school district in the state.

4. School districts shall be advised by the Department of Education of the requirement to use a safe schools checklist in compliance with Section 59-5-65, S.C. Code of Laws, 1976. This safety assessment should be part of the comprehensive needs assessment conducted for school improvement purposes in compliance with Section 59-20-60(4)(d), S.C. Code of Laws, 1976. In particular, a safe schools check list should be utilized in determining "school climate" needs, one of the six indicators of school effectiveness.

B. First Aid Supplies

Each school shall provide adequate first aid supplies and equipment.

C. Support for Authorities

The Board urges all citizens to continue their active and vigorous support of the local school and civil authorities in insuring the personal safety and security of all students and teachers.

D. Emergency and Disaster Plans

A plan shall be designed to provide for the protection and welfare of students in the event of any disaster (tornado, hurricane, fire, etc.) which threatens to involve the school community. Each school shall conduct at least one emergency drill within the first month of school to insure safety against such disasters.

E. Guidelines will be developed by the State Department of Education which will refer to statutory provisions relating to school safety, as well as additional information. The State Department of Education will review and update these guidelines as needed.

Sub Category
Funding appropriations
Statute

LAWS

59-66-20. School safety coordinator grant program; funding; requirements.

(A) The General Assembly annually shall provide funds in the general appropriations act to be awarded to school districts which choose to employ safety coordinators in accordance with this section. State funds may be awarded for not more than one safety coordinator for each county. The amount of the award for a county for fiscal year 1995-96 may not exceed twenty-five thousand dollars, except for counties which are designated as economically distressed pursuant to Section 41-43-180. Economically distressed counties participating in the program shall receive additional state funds for fiscal year 1995-96 in the amount of five thousand five hundred dollars. The amount which may be awarded for a county, including the additional state funds for economically distressed counties, must be increased each fiscal year after 1995-96 by the same percentage as the average teacher salary.

(B) An award of state funds to school districts under this program is contingent upon a district or group of districts jointly matching the state grant with an equal amount of funds and in-kind contributions; however, school districts located primarily within an economically distressed county are not required to match any portion of the state grant. Additionally, funds only may be awarded where the duties of the safety coordinator relate exclusively to school and district safety functions. It is the intent of the General Assembly that the safety coordinator have a strong background in law enforcement, safety matters, or coordination of relevant services.

(C) If a county consists of more than one school district, any or all school districts within the county may apply jointly for funds for a safety coordinator. Each participating school district must provide a portion of the local matching funds based upon the relationship the district's student membership bears to the total student membership of all participating districts within the county. Nonparticipating school districts

in multi-district counties may begin participation in the program by contributing to the local match in the same manner as those school districts originally participating in the program.

(D) When more than one school district in a multi-district county is provided funds under this section, the safety coordinator must be an employee of the school district with the largest student membership during the immediately preceding school year, unless the participating school districts have a memorandum of agreement providing otherwise; however, the safety coordinator must provide services to all participating school districts.

(E) For purposes of this section, "student membership" means the cumulative one hundred thirty-five day average daily membership during the immediately preceding school year.

(F) The State Board of Education, through the State Department of Education, shall develop and implement regulations establishing the safety coordinator grant program.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Major Category
Other/Uncategorized
Sub Category
Professional immunity or liability
Statute

LAWS

59-63-380. School official reporting school-related crimes; immunity.

A person affiliated with a school in an official capacity is granted immunity from criminal prosecution and civil liability when making a report of school-related crime in good faith, to the extent that the exposure to criminal prosecution or civil liability arises from the same report of school-related crime.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Community input or involvement
Statute

LAWS

59-63-140. Local school districts to adopt policies prohibiting harassment; required components; model policies by State Board of Education; bullying prevention programs.

(A) Before January 1, 2007, each local school district shall adopt a policy prohibiting harassment, intimidation, or bullying at school. The school district shall involve parents and guardians, school employees, volunteers, students, administrators, and community representatives in the process of creating the policy.

59-66-40. School safety task force.

(A)(1) There is created a school safety task force to:

(a) examine the various funding streams for school-based mental health services and determine how these streams may best be utilized in order to provide more accessible and efficient delivery of mental health programs;

(b) examine school mental health staffing ratios and provide suggestions that allow for the full delivery of services and effective school-community partnerships, including collaboration between school districts;

(c) develop standards for district level policies to promote effective school discipline and mental health intervention services;

(d) examine current intra- and interagency collaboration and suggest ways to improve cooperation; and

(e) examine how to best support multitiered systems of support.

(2) Any recommendations made by the task force must be revenue neutral.

(3) The task force shall report its findings and make recommendations concerning proposed changes to the General Assembly.

(B) The task force must be composed of:

(1) one member appointed by the South Carolina Association of Licensed Professional Counselors;

(2) one member appointed by the South Carolina Society for Clinical Social Work;

(3) one member appointed by the South Carolina Education Association;

(4) one member appointed by the Palmetto State Teachers Association;

(5) one member appointed by the South Carolina School Counselor Association;

(6) one member appointed by the South Carolina Association of School Psychologists;

(7) one member appointed by the South Carolina Association of School Social Workers;

(8) one member appointed by the South Carolina Association for Marriage and Family Therapy;

(9) one member appointed by the South Carolina Association of School Administrators;

(10) one member appointed by the South Carolina School Boards Association;

(11) one member appointed by the South Carolina Department of Mental Health;

(12) one member appointed by the South Carolina Association of School Resource Officers;

(13) one member appointed by the Chief of the State Law Enforcement Division;

(14) one member appointed by the Governor;

(15) one member appointed by the State Superintendent of Education;

(16) two members appointed by the Chairman of the House Education and Public Works Committee; and

(17) two members appointed by the Chairman of the Senate Education Committee.

(C) Vacancies in the membership of the task force must be filled for the remainder of the unexpired term in the manner of original appointment.

(D) Members of the task force shall serve without compensation and may not receive mileage or per diem.

(E) The staffing for the task force must be provided by the staff of the House Education and Public Works Committee and Senate Education Committee.

(F) The task force shall make a report of its recommendations to the General Assembly no later than December 31, 2014, at which time the task force must be dissolved.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Other or Uncategorized
Statute

LAWS

59-66-30. Public middle schools and high schools to be equipped with metal detector; training; regulations.

(A) Using funds appropriated by the General Assembly, each public middle, junior high, and high school in the State must be equipped with one hand-held metal detector.

(B) In consultation and cooperation with the Office of the Attorney General and the State Law Enforcement Division, the State Department of Education shall provide training in the use of hand-held metal detectors to school officials who shall use the equipment.

(C) The State Board of Education, through the State Department of Education, shall promulgate regulations to implement this section.

59-67-240. Other duties of driver; discipline of pupils for misconduct.

The driver of each school bus shall cooperate with the teachers in their work in the school to which he is transporting pupils by being on time in the mornings and waiting in the afternoons until all his pupils are dismissed by the school faculty and safely aboard his bus. He also shall take particular notice along his route in the mornings and give pupils within sight a reasonable time in which to board his bus. The driver shall be responsible for maintaining good conduct upon his bus and shall report promptly to the governing head of the school to or from which the pupils are transported any misconduct or any violation of the driver's instructions by any person riding in his bus.

District boards of school trustees in this State may authorize school administrators to suspend or expel pupils from riding a school bus for misconduct on the bus or for violating instructions of the driver.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Major Category
Sub Category
Statute
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