Utah

To view this state’s school discipline laws and regulations, scroll to a subcategory of interest and select “Laws and Regulations.”

Regulation Set
Major Category
General Provisions
Sub Category
Authority to develop and establish rules of conduct
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-4-402. Powers and duties generally.

(15)(a) A local school board shall make and enforce policies necessary for the control and management of the district schools.

(b) Local school board policies shall be in writing, filed, and referenced for public access.

§ 53G-8-202. Public school discipline policies–Basis of the policies–Enforcement.

(1) The Legislature recognizes that every student in the public schools should have the opportunity to learn in an environment which is safe, conducive to the learning process, and free from unnecessary disruption.

(2)(a) To foster such an environment, each local school board or charter school governing board, with input from school employees, parents of students, students, and the community at large, shall adopt conduct and discipline policies for the public schools in accordance with Section 53G-8-211.

(b) A district or charter school shall base its policies on the principle that every student is expected:

(i) to follow accepted standards of conduct; and

(ii) to show respect for other people and to obey persons in authority at the school.

(c)(i) On or before September 1, 2015, the state board shall revise the conduct and discipline policy models for elementary and secondary public schools to include procedures for responding to reports received through the SafeUT Crisis Line under Subsection 53B-17-1202(3).

(ii) Each district or charter school shall use the models, where appropriate, in developing its conduct and discipline policies under this chapter.

(d) The policies shall emphasize that certain behavior, most particularly behavior which disrupts, is unacceptable and may result in disciplinary action.

(3) The local superintendent and designated employees of the district or charter school shall enforce the policies so that students demonstrating unacceptable behavior and their parents understand that such behavior will not be tolerated and will be dealt with in accordance with the district's conduct and discipline policies.

§ 53G-8-203. Conduct and discipline policies and procedures.

(1) The conduct and discipline policies required under Section 53G-8-202 shall include:

(a) provisions governing student conduct, safety, and welfare;

(b) standards and procedures for dealing with students who cause disruption in the classroom, on school grounds, on school vehicles, or in connection with school-related activities or events;

(c) procedures for the development of remedial discipline plans for students who cause a disruption at any of the places referred to in Subsection (1)(b);

(d) procedures for the use of reasonable and necessary physical restraint in dealing with students posing a danger to themselves or others, consistent with Section 53G-8-302;

(e) standards and procedures for dealing with student conduct in locations other than those referred to in Subsection (1)(b), if the conduct threatens harm or does harm to:

(i) the school;

(ii) school property;

(iii) a person associated with the school; or

(iv) property associated with a person described in Subsection (1)(e)(iii);

(f) procedures for the imposition of disciplinary sanctions, including suspension and expulsion;

(g) specific provisions, consistent with Section 53E-3-509, for preventing and responding to gang-related activities in the school, on school grounds, on school vehicles, or in connection with school-related activities or events;

(h) standards and procedures for dealing with habitual disruptive or unsafe student behavior in accordance with the provisions of this part; and

(i) procedures for responding to reports received through the SafeUT Crisis Line under Subsection 53B-17-1202(3).

(2)(a) Each local school board shall establish a policy on detaining students after regular school hours as a part of the district-wide discipline plan required under Section 53G-8-202.

(b)(i) The policy described in Subsection (2)(a) shall apply to elementary school students, grades kindergarten through 6.

(ii) The local school board shall receive input from teachers, school administrators, and parents of the affected students before adopting the policy.

(c) The policy described in Subsection (2)(a) shall provide for:

(i) notice to the parent of a student prior to holding the student after school on a particular day; and

(ii) exceptions to the notice provision if detention is necessary for the student's health or safety.

§ 53G-10-405. Instruction on the harmful effects of alcohol, tobacco, and controlled substances–Rulemaking authority–Assistance from the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health.

(1) The state board shall adopt rules providing for instruction at each grade level on the harmful effects of alcohol, tobacco, and controlled substances upon the human body and society. The rules shall require but are not limited to instruction on the following:

(a) teaching of skills needed to evaluate advertisements for, and media portrayal of, alcohol, tobacco, and controlled substances;

(b) directing students towards healthy and productive alternatives to the use of alcohol, tobacco, and controlled substances; and

(c) discouraging the use of alcohol, tobacco, and controlled substances.

REGULATIONS

R277-606-1. Authority and purpose.

(1) This rule is authorized by:

(a) Utah Constitution Article X, Section 3, which vests general control and supervision over public education in the Board; and

(b) Section 53A-15-1903, which requires the Board to develop rules to set policies related to a dropout prevention and recovery program;

(c) Section 53A-1-401, which allows the Board to make rules to execute the Board's duties and responsibilities under the Utah Constitution and state law.

(2) The purpose of this rule is to:

(a) develop policies related to an LEA's dropout prevention and recovery program; and

(b) set reporting requirements for LEAs with a dropout prevention and recovery program.

R277-609-1. Authority and purpose.

(1) This rule is authorized by:

(a) Utah Constitution Article X, Section 3, which vests general control and supervision over public education in the Board;

(b) Section 53A-1-401, which allows the Board to make rules to execute the Board's duties and responsibilities under the Utah Constitution and state law;

(c) Subsection 53A-1-402(1)(b), which requires the Board to establish rules concerning discipline and control;

(d) Section 53E-3-509, which requires the Board to adopt rules that require a local school board or governing board of a charter school to enact gang prevention and intervention policies for all schools within the board's jurisdiction;

(e) Section 53A-11-1603, which requires the Board to adopt rules regarding training programs for school principals and school resource officers; and

(f) Section 53A-11-901, which directs local school boards and charter school governing boards to adopt conduct and discipline policies and directs the Board to develop model policies to assist local school boards and charter school governing boards.

(2)(a) The purpose of this rule is to outline requirements for school discipline plans and policies.

(b) An LEA's written policies shall include provisions to develop, implement, and monitor the policies for the use of emergency safety interventions in all schools and for all students within each LEA's jurisdiction.

R277-613-1. Authority and purpose.

(1) This rule is authorized by:

(a) Utah Constitution Article X, Section 3, which vests general control and supervision over public education in the Board; and

(b) Subsection ,53E-3-401(4)(a) which allows the Board to make rules to execute the Board's duties and responsibilities under the Utah Constitution and state law.

(2) The purpose of the rule is to:

(a) require LEAs to develop, update, and implement bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, retaliation, and abusive conduct policies at the school district and school level;

(b) provide for regular and meaningful training of school employees and students;

(c) provide for enforcement of the policies in schools, at the state level and in public school athletic programs; and

(d) require an LEA to review allegations of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, retaliation, and abusive conduct.

R277-615-2. Authority and purpose.

A. This rule is authorized by Utah Constitution Article X, Section 3 which vests general control and supervision of public education in the Board, by Section 53G-8-509 that directs the Board and LEAs to adopt rules to protect students against unreasonable and excessive intrusion of personal rights and privacy on school property or at school-sponsored activities, and by Section 53A-1-401(3) which allows the Board to adopt rules in accordance with its responsibilities.

B. The purpose of this rule is to direct LEAs to adopt rules or policies or both to protect student rights with procedures and provisions that balance students' rights and privacy with the responsibility of school officials for the safety and protection of students and adults while on school property or at school-sponsored events.

R277-709-1. Authority and purpose.

(1) This rule is authorized by:

(a) Utah Constitution Article X, Section 3 which vests general control and supervision of public education in the Board;

(b) Subsection 53E-3-401(4), which allows the Board to make rules to execute the Board's duties and responsibilities under the Utah Constitution and state law; and

(c) Subsection 53E-3-503(2)(b) which requires the Board to adopt rules for the distribution of funds for the education of youth in custody.

(2) The purpose of this rule is to specify operation standards, procedures, and distribution of funds for youth in custody programs.

Sub Category
Scope
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-8-203. Conduct and discipline policies and procedures.

(1) The conduct and discipline policies required under Section 53G-8-202 shall include:

(a) provisions governing student conduct, safety, and welfare;

(b) standards and procedures for dealing with students who cause disruption in the classroom, on school grounds, on school vehicles, or in connection with school-related activities or events;

(c) procedures for the development of remedial discipline plans for students who cause a disruption at any of the places referred to in Subsection (1)(b);

(d) procedures for the use of reasonable and necessary physical restraint in dealing with students posing a danger to themselves or others, consistent with Section 53G-8-302;

(e) standards and procedures for dealing with student conduct in locations other than those referred to in Subsection (1)(b), if the conduct threatens harm or does harm to:

(i) the school;

(ii) school property;

(iii) a person associated with the school; or

(iv) property associated with a person described in Subsection (1)(e)(iii);

(f) procedures for the imposition of disciplinary sanctions, including suspension and expulsion;

(g) specific provisions, consistent with Section 53E-3-509, for preventing and responding to gang-related activities in the school, on school grounds, on school vehicles, or in connection with school-related activities or events;

(h) standards and procedures for dealing with habitual disruptive or unsafe student behavior in accordance with the provisions of this part; and

(i) procedures for responding to reports received through the SafeUT Crisis Line under Subsection 53B-17-1202(3).

(2)(a) Each local school board shall establish a policy on detaining students after regular school hours as a part of the district-wide discipline plan required under Section 53G-8-202.

(b)(i) The policy described in Subsection (2)(a) shall apply to elementary school students, grades kindergarten through 6.

(ii) The local school board shall receive input from teachers, school administrators, and parents of the affected students before adopting the policy.

(c) The policy described in Subsection (2)(a) shall provide for:

(i) notice to the parent of a student prior to holding the student after school on a particular day; and

(ii) exceptions to the notice provision if detention is necessary for the student's health or safety.

§ 53G-8-602. Possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages at school or school-sponsored activities–Penalty.

(1) Except as approved by a local school board as part of the curriculum, a person may not possess or drink an alcoholic beverage:

(a) inside or on the grounds of any building owned or operated by a part of the public education system; or

(b) in those portions of any building, park, or stadium which are being used for an activity sponsored by or through any part of the public education system.

(2)(a) Subsection (1)(a) does not apply to property owned by a school district in contemplation of future use for school purposes while the property is under lease to another party.

(b)(i) For purposes of Subsection (2)(a), a lease must be full time for a period of not less than two years.

(ii) The property may not be used for school purposes at any time during the lease period.

(3) Violation of this section is a class B misdemeanor.

REGULATIONS

R277-613-4. LEA responsibility to createor updatebullying policies.

(3) Subject to the parental consent requirements of Section 53E-9-203, if applicable, an LEA shall assess students about the prevalence of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation in LEAs and schools, specifically locations where students are unsafe and additional adult supervision may be required, such as playgrounds, hallways, and lunch areas.

Sub Category
Communication of policy
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-4-402. Powers and duties generally.

(15)(a) A local school board shall make and enforce policies necessary for the control and management of the district schools.

(b) Local school board policies shall be in writing, filed, and referenced for public access.

§ 53G-8-204. Suspension and expulsion procedures -Notice to parents -Distribution of policies.

(1)(a) Policies required under this part shall include written procedures for the suspension and expulsion of, or denial of admission to, a student, consistent with due process and other provisions of law.

(b)(i) The policies required in Subsection (1)(a) shall include a procedure directing public schools to notify the custodial parent and, if requested in writing by a noncustodial parent, the noncustodial parent of the suspension and expulsion of, or denial of admission to, a student.

(ii) Subsection (1)(b)(i) does not apply to that portion of school records which would disclose any information protected under a court order.

(iii) The custodial parent is responsible for providing to the school a certified copy of the court order under Subsection (1)(b)(ii) through a procedure adopted by the local school board or the charter school governing board.

(2)(a) Each local school board or charter school governing board shall provide for the distribution of a copy of a school's discipline and conduct policy to each student upon enrollment in the school.

(b) A copy of the policy shall be posted in a prominent location in each school.

(c) Any significant change in a school's conduct and discipline policy shall be distributed to students in the school and posted in the school in a prominent location.

§ 53G-9-605. Bullying, cyber-bullying, harassment, hazing, and retaliation policy.

(1) On or before September 1, 2018, an LEA governing board shall update the LEA governing board's bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation policy to include abusive conduct.

(4) A copy of a policy shall be:

(a) included in student conduct handbooks;

(b) included in employee handbooks; and

(c) provided to a parent of a student enrolled in the charter school or school district.

REGULATIONS

R277-609-4. LEA responsibility to develop plans.

(3) A plan described in Subsection (1) shall include:

(u) provisions that account for an individual LEA's or school's unique needs or circumstances, including:

(iii) a provision for publication of notice to parents and school employees of policies by reasonable means.

R277-613-4. LEA responsibility to createor updatebullying policies.

(1) In addition to the requirements of Subsection 53G-9-605(3), an LEA shall:

(a) develop, update, and implement policies as required by Subsection 53G-9-605 and this rule, which shall include a prohibition on:

(i) bullying;

(ii) cyber-bullying;

(iii) hazing;

(iv) retaliation; and

(v) making a false report.

(b) post a copy of the LEA's policy on the LEA website;

(c) develop an action plan to address a reported incident of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, or retaliation; and

(d) provide a requirement for a signed statement that meets the requirements of Subsection 53G-9-605(3)(h) annually.

Major Category
In-School Discipline
Sub Category
Use of multi-tiered discipline approaches
Statute

LAWS

No relevant laws found.

REGULATIONS

R277-609-3. Incorporation of least restricted behavioral interventions (LRBI) technical assistance manual by reference.

(1) This rule incorporates by reference the LRBI Technical Assistance Manual, dated September 2015, provides guidance and information in creating successful behavioral systems and supports within Utah's public schools that:

(a) promote positive behaviors while preventing negative or risky behaviors; and

(b) create a safe learning environment that enhances all student outcomes.

(2) A copy of the manual is located at:

(b) the Utah State Board of Education.

R277-609-4. LEA responsibility to develop plans.

(3) A plan described in Subsection (1) shall include:

(m) direction for schools to determine the range of behaviors and establish the continuum of administrative procedures that may be used by school personnel to address the behavior of habitually disruptive students;

R277-609-6. Implementation.

(2) An LEA shall develop, use and monitor a continuum of intervention strategies to assist students, including students whose behavior in school falls repeatedly short of reasonable expectations, by teaching student behavior expectations, reinforcing student behavior expectations, re-teaching behavior expectations, followed by effective, evidence-based interventions matched to student needs prior to administrative referral.

(3) An LEA shall implement positive behavior interventions and supports as part of the LEA's continuum of behavior interventions strategies.

Sub Category
Teacher authority to remove students from classrooms
Statute

No relevant laws or regulations found.

Sub Category
Alternatives to suspension
Statute

LAWS

41-15B-2.2. Allocation of trust fund revenues.

(a) For each fiscal year, beginning October 1, 1999, contingent upon the Children First Trust Fund receiving tobacco revenues and upon appropriation by the Legislature, an amount of up to and including two hundred twenty-five thousand dollars ($225,000), or equivalent percentage of the total fund, shall be designated for the administration of the fund by the council and the Commissioner of Children's Affairs.

(b) For each fiscal year, beginning October 1, 1999, contingent upon the Children First Trust Fund receiving tobacco revenues, the remainder of the Children First Trust Fund, in the amounts provided for in Section 41-15B-2.1, shall be allocated as follows:

(2) Twenty-two percent of the fund shall be allocated to the State Board of Education to one or more of the following:

a. The operation of alternative schools as defined below:

1. In the initial fiscal year funding after June 9, 1999, the State Board of Education shall distribute a pro rata share of the monies based upon the second month enrollment of the preceding school year to each local board of education which submits a plan that satisfies all of the following criteria:

(i) The local board of education shall provide a 25 percent match of all funds for alternative school programs.

(ii) The local board of education shall provide suitable facilities for housing alternative school programs.

(iii) The plan submitted by each local board of education shall provide multiple tiers of alternative school programs which include, but are not limited to, "in-school suspension," a short-term alternative school program designed to enable children to perform in the traditional classroom setting, and a long-term program which is a true alternative to expulsion.

(iv) The plan as submitted by each local board of education shall outline the educational services which shall be available to each child assigned to the short-term or long-term programs. Those services shall include, but are not limited to, all of the following:

A. Remedial education where necessary.

B. Counseling, including sessions on conflict resolution.

C. Social skills development.

(v) Each tier of the local plan shall be curriculum-based to address the goal of academic improvement and shall include, to the extent possible, mandatory parental notification and involvement.

(vi) If a local board of education can satisfactorily demonstrate that alternative school programs meeting all of the criteria in this section have been implemented, the allocation to the local board of education for alternative school programs may be directed by the State Board of Education to programs under the School Safety Enhancement Program.

(vii) Each year any monies remaining after distribution by the State Board of Education to the local boards of education which meet the criteria pursuant to subparagraph 1. and qualify for a portion of the monies, shall be allocated to those local boards of education demonstrating innovative programs with measurable improvements in academic achievement, attendance, school behavior, and parental involvement.

2. The State Board of Education shall review the programs of each local board of education receiving monies from the fund and shall annually submit a report to the council by July 1. This report shall include all of the following:

(i) The number of children served in each tier of the program.

(ii) The improvement in academic achievement.

(iii) The improvement in behavior.

(iv) The improvement in parental involvement.

(v) Financial accounting for the state and local monies expended.

3. The State Board of Education shall develop additional criteria for continued state funding of programs initiated pursuant to this chapter.

4. Sufficient safeguards shall be implemented to ensure that the new monies will increase and not supplant or decrease existing state or local support.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Use of corporal punishment
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-8-301. Definitions.

As used in this part:

(1) "Corporal punishment" means the intentional infliction of physical pain upon the body of a student as a disciplinary measure.

(2) "Physical escort" means a temporary touching or holding of the hand, wrist, arm, shoulder, or back for the purpose of guiding a student to another location.

(3) "Physical restraint" means a personal restriction that immobilizes or significantly reduces the ability of a student to move the student's arms, legs, body, or head freely.

(4) "School" means a public or private elementary school, secondary school, or preschool.

(5) "Student" means an individual who is:

(a) under the age of 19 and receiving educational services; or

(b) under the age of 23 and receiving educational services as an individual with a disability.

§ 53G-8-302. Prohibition of corporal punishment -Use of reasonable and necessary physical restraint.

(1) A school employee may not inflict or cause the infliction of corporal punishment upon a student.

(2) A school employee may use reasonable and necessary physical restraint in self defense or when otherwise appropriate to the circumstances to:

(a) obtain possession of a weapon or other dangerous object in the possession or under the control of a student;

(b) protect a student or another individual from physical injury;

(c) remove from a situation a student who is violent; or

(d) protect property from being damaged, when physical safety is at risk.

(3) Nothing in this section prohibits a school employee from using less intrusive means, including a physical escort, to address circumstances described in Subsection (2).

(4)(a) Any rule, ordinance, policy, practice, or directive which purports to direct or permit the commission of an act prohibited by this part is void and unenforceable.

(b) An employee may not be subjected to any sanction for failure or refusal to commit an act prohibited under this part.

(5) A parochial or private school that does not receive state funds to provide for the education of a student may exempt itself from the provisions of this section by adopting a policy to that effect and notifying the parents of students in the school of the exemption.

(6) This section does not apply to a law enforcement officer as defined in Section 53-13-103.

§ 53G-8-303. Investigation of complaint -Confidentiality -Immunity.

(1)(a) The reporting and investigation requirements of Title 62A, Chapter 4a, Part 4, Child Abuse or Neglect Reporting Requirements, apply to complaints on corporal punishment.

(b) If a violation is confirmed, school authorities shall take prompt and appropriate action, including in-service training and other administrative action, to ensure against a repetition of the violation.

(2) Reports made on violations of this part are subject to the same requirements of confidentiality as provided under Section 62A-4a-412.

(3) Any school or individual who in good faith makes a report or cooperates in an investigation by a school or authorized public agency concerning a violation of this part is immune from any civil or criminal liability that might otherwise result by reason of those actions.

§ 53G-8-304. Liability.

(1)(a) Corporal punishment which would, but for this part, be considered to be reasonable discipline of a minor under Section 76-2-401 may not be used as a basis for any civil or criminal action.

(b) A court of competent jurisdiction may take appropriate action against any employing entity if the court finds that the employing entity has not taken reasonable steps to enforce the provisions of this part.

(2) Civil or criminal action may proceed without hindrance in the case of corporal punishment which would not be reasonable discipline under Sections 53G-8-305 and 76-2-401.

§ 53G-8-305. Exception.

Behavior reduction intervention which is in compliance with Section 76-2-401 and with state and local rules adopted under Section 53E-7-204 is excepted from this part.

REGULATIONS

R277-608-1. Definitions.

A. "Board" means the Utah State Board of Education.

B. "Corporal punishment" means the intentional infliction of physical pain upon the body of a minor child as a disciplinary measure.

C. "LEA" means a local education agency, including local school boards/public school districts, charter schools, and the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind.

D. "USOE" means the Utah State Office of Education.

R277-608-2. Authority and purpose.

A. This rule is authorized by Utah Constitution Article X, Section 3 which vests the general control and supervision of public education in the Board, Section 53A-1-401(3) which allows the Board to adopt rules in accordance with its responsibilities and Sections 53G-8-301 through 53G-8-305 which provide guidelines for the use of reasonable and necessary physical restraint or force in educational settings.

B. The purpose of this rule is to direct LEAs to have policies in place that prohibit corporal punishment consistent with the law.

R277-608-3. Reporting requirements.

A. Each LEA shall incorporate in the LEA plan submitted to the USOE annually, the prohibition of corporal punishment consistent with the law.

B. An LEA policy shall incorporate a prohibition of corporal punishment consistent with the law, appropriate sanctions and appeal procedures for LEA employees disciplined under this rule and the corresponding state statute.

R277-608-4. Special education exception(s) to this rule.

LEAs shall have in place, as part of their LEA special education plans, procedures or manuals, criteria and procedures for using appropriate behavior reduction intervention in accordance with state and federal law.

R277-609-5. Physical restraint and seclusionary time out.

(5) An LEA may not use physical restraint as a means of discipline or punishment.

(11) A public education employee may not use seclusionary time out as a means of discipline or punishment.

Sub Category
Use of student and locker searches
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-8-508. Admissibility of evidence in civil and criminal actions.

(1) Evidence relating to violation of Section 53G-8-505, 53G-8-506, 53G-8-507, or 53G-8-509, which is seized by school authorities acting alone, on their own authority, and not in conjunction with or at the behest of law enforcement authorities is admissible in civil and criminal actions.

(2) A search under this section must be based on at least a reasonable belief that the search will turn up evidence of a violation of this part. The measures adopted for the search must be reasonably related to the objectives of the search and not excessively intrusive in light of the circumstances, including the age and sex of the person involved and the nature of the infraction.

§ 53G-8-509. Board rules to ensure protection of individual rights.

The state board and LEA governing boards shall adopt rules or policies to implement this part. The rules or policies shall establish procedures to ensure protection of individual rights against excessive and unreasonable intrusion.

REGULATIONS

R277-615-1. Definitions.

A. "Board" means the Utah State Board of Education.

B. "Controlled substances" means substances identified under Sections 58-37-2, 58-37a-3 and 58-37b-2.

C. "Law enforcement authorities" means officers working under the direct supervision and in the employment of police or law enforcement, as opposed to under the supervision of a public education, agency. Law enforcement authorities have received police officer training and are acting in that capacity.

D. "LEA" means a local education agency, including local school boards/public school districts, charter schools, and the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind.

E. "Reasonable suspicion" means a particularized and objective basis, supported by objective and articulable facts leading the searcher to believe that there is a moderate chance of finding evidence of wrongdoing. Reasonableness considers the totality of the circumstances including such factors as the scope and manner of the intrusion, the justification for the search, the nature of the infraction, the place where the search is conducted, the student's age, history and school record, the prevalence and seriousness of the problem in the school, the exigency requiring the search without delay, the reliability of the information used as a justification for the search, and the school official's prior experience with the student. The search shall be reasonable both in inception of the search and the scope of the search.

F. "School official" means a school superintendent, associate superintendent, school district specialist, school principal or assistant principal or charter school employee who is a director, principal, headmaster, or assistant administrator.

G. "Weapon" means any item capable of causing death or serious bodily injury or a facsimile or representation of the item.

R277-615-2. Authority and Purpose.

A. This rule is authorized by Utah Constitution Article X, Section 3 which vests general control and supervision of public education in the Board, by Section 53G-8-509 that directs the Board and LEAs to adopt rules to protect students against unreasonable and excessive intrusion of personal rights and privacy on school property or at school-sponsored activities, and by Section 53A-1-401(3) which allows the Board to adopt rules in accordance with its responsibilities.

B. The purpose of this rule is to direct LEAs to adopt rules or policies or both to protect student rights with procedures and provisions that balance students' rights and privacy with the responsibility of school officials for the safety and protection of students and adults while on school property or at school-sponsored events.

R277-615-3. Board responsibilities.

A. The Board shall provide consistent definitions for LEAs to include in policies.

B. The Board shall develop a model policy as guidance for LEAs.

C. The Board shall include an assurance for LEAs regarding the student search policy required under Section 53G-8-509 in the Utah Consolidated Report, beginning with the 2012-13 school year.

R277-615-4. LEA responsibilities.

A. LEAs shall develop a policy for searching students for controlled substances as required under Utah law and for weapons before June 30, 2012.

B. LEAs shall include appropriate interested parties in the development of student search policies, including parents, school employees, and licensed school employees.

C. LEA policies shall ensure protection of individual student rights against excessive and unreasonable intrusion.

D. LEAs shall make policies available to parents electronically and in materials provided to parents and students upon enrollment as soon as reasonably possible following adoption of policies.

E. LEAs shall provide adequate training to appropriate classes of employees for fair and consistent implementation of student search policies.

Sub Category
Other in-school disciplinary approaches
Statute

No relevant laws or regulations found.

Major Category
Out-of-School and Exclusionary Discipline: Suspension,Expulsion, Restraint and Seclusion, and Alternative Placements
Sub Category
Grounds for possible suspension or expulsion
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-8-205. Grounds for suspension or expulsion from a public school.

(1) A student may be suspended or expelled from a public school for any of the following reasons:

(a) frequent or flagrant willful disobedience, defiance of proper authority, or disruptive behavior, including the use of foul, profane, vulgar, or abusive language;

(b) willful destruction or defacing of school property;

(c) behavior or threatened behavior which poses an immediate and significant threat to the welfare, safety, or morals of other students or school personnel or to the operation of the school;

(d) possession, control, or use of an alcoholic beverage as defined in Section 32B-1-102;

(e) behavior proscribed under Subsection (2) which threatens harm or does harm to the school or school property, to a person associated with the school, or property associated with that person, regardless of where it occurs; or

(f) possession or use of pornographic material on school property[...]

§ 53G-8-212. Defacing or injuring school property -Student's liability -Voluntary work program alternative.

(1) A student who willfully defaces or otherwise damages any school property may be suspended or otherwise disciplined.

(2)(a) If a school's property has been lost or willfully cut, defaced, or otherwise damaged, the school may withhold the issuance of an official written grade report, diploma, or transcript of the student responsible for the damage or loss until the student or the student's parent has paid for the damages.

(b) The student's parent is liable for damages as otherwise provided in Section 78A-6-1113.

(3)(a) If the student and the student's parent are unable to pay for the damages or if it is determined by the school in consultation with the student's parent that the student's interests would not be served if the parent were to pay for the damages, the school shall provide for a program of work the student may complete in lieu of the payment.

(b) The school shall release the official grades, diploma, and transcripts of the student upon completion of the work.

(4) Before any penalties are assessed under this section, the school shall adopt procedures to ensure that the student's right to due process is protected.

(5) No penalty may be assessed for damages which may be reasonably attributed to normal wear and tear.

(6) If the Department of Human Services or a licensed child-placing agency has been granted custody of the student, the student's records, if requested by the department or agency, may not be withheld from the department or agency for nonpayment of damages under this section.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Grounds for mandatory suspension or expulsion
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-8-205. Grounds for suspension or expulsion from a public school.

(2)(a) A student shall be suspended or expelled from a public school for any of the following reasons:

(i) any serious violation affecting another student or a staff member, or any serious violation occurring in a school building, in or on school property, or in conjunction with any school activity, including:

(A) the possession, control, or actual or threatened use of a real weapon, explosive, or noxious or flammable material;

(B) the actual or threatened use of a look alike weapon with intent to intimidate another person or to disrupt normal school activities; or

(C) the sale, control, or distribution of a drug or controlled substance as defined in Section 58-37-2, an imitation controlled substance defined in Section 58-37b-2, or drug paraphernalia as defined in Section 58-37a-3; or

(ii) the commission of an act involving the use of force or the threatened use of force which if committed by an adult would be a felony or class A misdemeanor.

(b) A student who commits a violation of Subsection (2)(a) involving a real or look alike weapon, explosive, or flammable material shall be expelled from school for a period of not less than one year subject to the following:

(i) within 45 days after the expulsion the student shall appear before the student's local school board superintendent, the superintendent's designee, chief administrative officer of a charter school, or the chief administrative officer's designee, accompanied by a parent; and

(ii) the superintendent, chief administrator, or designee shall determine:

(A) what conditions must be met by the student and the student's parent for the student to return to school;

(B) if the student should be placed on probation in a regular or alternative school setting consistent with Section 53G-8-208, and what conditions must be met by the student in order to ensure the safety of students and faculty at the school the student is placed in; and

(C) if it would be in the best interest of both the school district or charter school, and the student, to modify the expulsion term to less than a year, conditioned on approval by the local school board or charter school governing board and giving highest priority to providing a safe school environment for all students[...]

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Limitations, conditions, or exclusions for use of suspension and expulsion
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-8-205. Grounds for suspension or expulsion from a public school.

(4) A suspension or expulsion under this section is not subject to the age limitations under Subsection 53G-6-204 (1)[...]

§ 53G-8-206. Delegation of authority to suspend or expel a student -Procedure for suspension -Readmission.

(1)(a) A local school board may delegate to any school principal or assistant principal within the school district the power to suspend a student in the principal's school for up to ten school days.

(b) A charter school governing board may delegate to the chief administrative officer of the charter school the power to suspend a student in the charter school for up to ten school days.

(2) The local school board or charter school governing board may suspend a student for up to one school year or delegate that power to the district superintendent, the superintendent's designee, or chief administrative officer of a charter school.

(3) The local school board may expel a student for a fixed or indefinite period, provided that the expulsion shall be reviewed by the district superintendent or the superintendent's designee and the conclusions reported to the local school board, at least once each year.

(4) If a student is suspended, a designated school official shall notify the parent of the student of the following without delay:

(a) that the student has been suspended;

(b) the grounds for the suspension;

(c) the period of time for which the student is suspended; and

(d) the time and place for the parent to meet with a designated school official to review the suspension.

(5)(a) A suspended student shall immediately leave the school building and the school grounds following a determination by the school of the best way to transfer custody of the student to the parent or other person authorized by the parent or applicable law to accept custody of the student.

(b) Except as otherwise provided in Subsection (5)(c), a suspended student may not be readmitted to a public school until:

(i) the student and the parent have met with a designated school official to review the suspension and agreed upon a plan to avoid recurrence of the problem; or

(ii) in the discretion of the principal or chief administrative officer of a charter school, the parent of the suspended student and the student have agreed to participate in such a meeting.

(c) A suspension may not extend beyond ten school days unless the student and the student's parent have been given a reasonable opportunity to meet with a designated school official and respond to the allegations and proposed disciplinary action.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Administrative procedures related to suspension and expulsion
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-8-206. Delegation of authority to suspend or expel a student -Procedure for suspension -Readmission.

(1)(a) A local school board may delegate to any school principal or assistant principal within the school district the power to suspend a student in the principal's school for up to ten school days.

(b) A charter school governing board may delegate to the chief administrative officer of the charter school the power to suspend a student in the charter school for up to ten school days.

(2) The local school board or charter school governing board may suspend a student for up to one school year or delegate that power to the district superintendent, the superintendent's designee, or chief administrative officer of a charter school.

(3) The local school board may expel a student for a fixed or indefinite period, provided that the expulsion shall be reviewed by the district superintendent or the superintendent's designee and the conclusions reported to the local school board, at least once each year.

(4) If a student is suspended, a designated school official shall notify the parent of the student of the following without delay:

(a) that the student has been suspended;

(b) the grounds for the suspension;

(c) the period of time for which the student is suspended; and

(d) the time and place for the parent to meet with a designated school official to review the suspension.

(5)(a) A suspended student shall immediately leave the school building and the school grounds following a determination by the school of the best way to transfer custody of the student to the parent or other person authorized by the parent or applicable law to accept custody of the student.

(b) Except as otherwise provided in Subsection (5)(c), a suspended student may not be readmitted to a public school until:

(i) the student and the parent have met with a designated school official to review the suspension and agreed upon a plan to avoid recurrence of the problem; or

(ii) in the discretion of the principal or chief administrative officer of a charter school, the parent of the suspended student and the student have agreed to participate in such a meeting.

(c) A suspension may not extend beyond ten school days unless the student and the student's parent have been given a reasonable opportunity to meet with a designated school official and respond to the allegations and proposed disciplinary action.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
In-school suspension
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-8-207. Alternatives to suspension or expulsion.

(1) Each local school board or charter school governing board shall establish:

(b) alternatives to suspension, including policies that allow a student to remain in school under an in-school suspension program or under a program allowing the parent, with the consent of the student's teacher or teachers, to attend class with the student for a period of time specified by a designated school official.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Return to school following removal
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-8-205. Grounds for suspension or expulsion from a public school.

(2)(b) A student who commits a violation of Subsection (2)(a) involving a real or look alike weapon, explosive, or flammable material shall be expelled from school for a period of not less than one year subject to the following:

(i) within 45 days after the expulsion the student shall appear before the student's local school board superintendent, the superintendent's designee, chief administrative officer of a charter school, or the chief administrative officer's designee, accompanied by a parent; and

(ii) the superintendent, chief administrator, or designee shall determine:

(A) what conditions must be met by the student and the student's parent for the student to return to school;

(B) if the student should be placed on probation in a regular or alternative school setting consistent with Section 53G-8-208, and what conditions must be met by the student in order to ensure the safety of students and faculty at the school the student is placed in; and

(C) if it would be in the best interest of both the school district or charter school, and the student, to modify the expulsion term to less than a year, conditioned on approval by the local school board or charter school governing board and giving highest priority to providing a safe school environment for all students[...]

(3) A student may be denied admission to a public school on the basis of having been expelled from that or any other school during the preceding 12 months [...]

§ 53G-8-206. Delegation of authority to suspend or expel a student -Procedure for suspension -Readmission.

(5)(b) Except as otherwise provided in Subsection (5)(c), a suspended student may not be readmitted to a public school until:

(i) the student and the parent have met with a designated school official to review the suspension and agreed upon a plan to avoid recurrence of the problem; or

(ii) in the discretion of the principal or chief administrative officer of a charter school, the parent of the suspended student and the student have agreed to participate in such a meeting.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Use of restraint and seclusion
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-8-203. Conduct and discipline policies and procedures.

(1) The conduct and discipline policies required under Section 53G-8-202 shall include:

(d) procedures for the use of reasonable and necessary physical restraint in dealing with students posing a danger to themselves or others, consistent with Section 53G-8-302;

§ 53G-8-301. Definitions.

As used in this part:

(1) "Corporal punishment" means the intentional infliction of physical pain upon the body of a student as a disciplinary measure.

(2) "Physical escort" means a temporary touching or holding of the hand, wrist, arm, shoulder, or back for the purpose of guiding a student to another location.

(3) "Physical restraint" means a personal restriction that immobilizes or significantly reduces the ability of a student to move the student's arms, legs, body, or head freely.

(4) "School" means a public or private elementary school, secondary school, or preschool.

(5) "Student" means an individual who is:

(a) under the age of 19 and receiving educational services; or

(b) under the age of 23 and receiving educational services as an individual with a disability.

§ 53G-8-302. Prohibition of corporal punishment -Use of reasonable and necessary physical restraint.

(1) A school employee may not inflict or cause the infliction of corporal punishment upon a student.

(2) A school employee may use reasonable and necessary physical restraint in self defense or when otherwise appropriate to the circumstances to:

(a) obtain possession of a weapon or other dangerous object in the possession or under the control of a student;

(b) protect a student or another individual from physical injury;

(c) remove from a situation a student who is violent; or

(d) protect property from being damaged, when physical safety is at risk.

(3) Nothing in this section prohibits a school employee from using less intrusive means, including a physical escort, to address circumstances described in Subsection (2).

(4)(a) Any rule, ordinance, policy, practice, or directive which purports to direct or permit the commission of an act prohibited by this part is void and unenforceable.

(b) An employee may not be subjected to any sanction for failure or refusal to commit an act prohibited under this part.

(5) A parochial or private school that does not receive state funds to provide for the education of a student may exempt itself from the provisions of this section by adopting a policy to that effect and notifying the parents of students in the school of the exemption.

(6) This section does not apply to a law enforcement officer as defined in Section 53-13-103.

§ 53G-8-303. Investigation of complaint–Confidentiality–Immunity.

(1)(a) The reporting and investigation requirements of Title 62A, Chapter 4a, Part 4, Child Abuse or Neglect Reporting Requirements, apply to complaints on corporal punishment.

(b) If a violation is confirmed, school authorities shall take prompt and appropriate action, including in-service training and other administrative action, to ensure against a repetition of the violation.

(2) Reports made on violations of this part are subject to the same requirements of confidentiality as provided under Section 62A-4a-412.

(3) Any school or individual who in good faith makes a report or cooperates in an investigation by a school or authorized public agency concerning a violation of this part is immune from any civil or criminal liability that might otherwise result by reason of those actions.

§ 53G-8-304. Liability.

(1)(a) Corporal punishment which would, but for this part, be considered to be reasonable discipline of a minor under Section 76-2-401 may not be used as a basis for any civil or criminal action.

(b) A court of competent jurisdiction may take appropriate action against any employing entity if the court finds that the employing entity has not taken reasonable steps to enforce the provisions of this part.

(2) Civil or criminal action may proceed without hindrance in the case of corporal punishment which would not be reasonable discipline under Sections 53G-8-305 and 76-2-401.

§ 53G-8-305. Exception.

Behavior reduction intervention which is in compliance with Section 76-2-401 and with state and local rules adopted under Section 53E-7-204 is excepted from this part.

REGULATIONS

R277-608-2. Authority and purpose.

A. This rule is authorized by Utah Constitution Article X, Section 3 which vests the general control and supervision of public education in the Board, Section 53A-1-401(3) which allows the Board to adopt rules in accordance with its responsibilities and Sections 53G-8-301 through 53G-8-305 which provide guidelines for the use of reasonable and necessary physical restraint or force in educational settings.

B. The purpose of this rule is to direct LEAs to have policies in place that prohibit corporal punishment consistent with the law.

R277-609-1. Authority and purpose.

(1) This rule is authorized by:

(a) Utah Constitution Article X, Section 3, which vests general control and supervision over public education in the Board;

(b) Section 53A-1-401, which allows the Board to make rules to execute the Board's duties and responsibilities under the Utah Constitution and state law;

(c) Subsection 53A-1-402(1)(b), which requires the Board to establish rules concerning discipline and control;

(d) Section 53E-3-509, which requires the Board to adopt rules that require a local school board or governing board of a charter school to enact gang prevention and intervention policies for all schools within the board's jurisdiction;

(e) Section 53A-11-1603, which requires the Board to adopt rules regarding training programs for school principals and school resource officers; and

(f) Section 53A-11-901, which directs local school boards and charter school governing boards to adopt conduct and discipline policies and directs the Board to develop model policies to assist local school boards and charter school governing boards.

(2)(a) The purpose of this rule is to outline requirements for school discipline plans and policies.

(b) An LEA's written policies shall include provisions to develop, implement, and monitor the policies for the use of emergency safety interventions in all schools and for all students within each LEA's jurisdiction.

R277-609-2. Definitions.

(1) "Discipline" includes:

(a) imposed discipline; and

(b) self-discipline.

(2) "Disruptive student behavior" includes:

(a) the grounds for suspension or expulsion described in Section 53G-8-205; and

(b) the conduct described in Subsection 53G-8-209 (2)(b).

(3)(a) "Emergency safety intervention" means the use of seclusionary time out or physical restraint when a student presents an immediate danger to self or others.

(b) An "emergency safety intervention" is not for disciplinary purposes.

(4) "Functional Behavior Assessment" or "FBA" means a systematic process of identifying problem behaviors and the events that reliably predict occurrence and non-occurrence of those behaviors and maintain the behaviors across time.

(5) "Immediate danger" means the imminent danger of physical violence or aggression towards self or others, which is likely to cause serious physical harm.

(6) "Imposed discipline" means a code of conduct prescribed for the highest welfare of the individual and of the society in which the individual lives.

(7) "LEA" includes, for purposes of this rule, the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind.

(8) "Physical restraint" means personal restriction that immobilizes or reduces the ability of an individual to move the individual's arms, legs, body, or head freely.

(9) "Plan" means an LEA and school-wide written model for prevention and intervention addressing student behavior management and discipline procedures for students.

(10) "Program" means an instructional or behavioral program, including a program:

(a) provided by contract private providers under the direct supervision of public school staff;

(b) that receives public funding; or

(c) for which the Board has regulatory authority.

(11) "Policy" means standards and procedures that include:

(a) the provisions of Section 53A-11-901 and additional standards, procedures, and training adopted in an open meeting by a local board of education or charter school board that:

(i) defines hazing, bullying, cyber-bullying, and harassment;

(ii) prohibits hazing and bullying;

(iii) requires annual discussion and training designed to prevent hazing, bullying, cyber-bullying, discipline, emergency safety interventions, and harassment among school employees and students; and

(iv) provides for enforcement through employment action or student discipline.

(12) "Qualifying minor" means a school-age minor who:

(a) is at least nine years old; or

(b) turns nine years old at any time during the school year.

(13) "School" means any public elementary or secondary school or charter school.

(14) "School board" means:

(a) a local school board; or

(b) a local charter board.

(15) "School employee" means:

(a) a school teacher;

(b) a school staff member;

(c) a school administrator; or

(d) any other person employed, directly or indirectly, by an LEA.

(16) "Seclusionary time out" means that a student is:

(a) placed in a safe enclosed area by school personnel in accordance with the requirements of Rules R392-200 and R710-4;

(b) purposefully isolated from adults and peers; and

(c) prevented from leaving, or reasonably believes that the student will be prevented from leaving, the enclosed area.

(17) "Section 504 accommodation plan," required by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, means a plan designed to accommodate an individual who has been determined, as a result of an evaluation, to have a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities.

(18) "Self-Discipline" means a personal system of organized behavior designed to promote self-interest while contributing to the welfare of others.

R277-609-3. Incorporation of least restricted behavioral interventions (LRBI) technical assistance manual by reference.

(1) This rule incorporates by reference the LRBI Technical Assistance Manual, dated September 2015, provides guidance and information in creating successful behavioral systems and supports within Utah's public schools that:

(a) promote positive behaviors while preventing negative or risky behaviors; and

(b) create a safe learning environment that enhances all student outcomes.

(2) A copy of the manual is located at:

(b) the Utah State Board of Education.

R277-609-4. LEA responsibility to develop plans.

(1) An LEA or school shall develop and implement a board approved comprehensive LEA plan or policy for student and classroom management, and school discipline.

(2) An LEA shall include administration, instruction and support staff, students, parents, community council, and other community members in policy development, training, and prevention implementation so as to create a community sense of participation, ownership, support, and responsibility.

(3) A plan described in Subsection (1) shall include:

(a) the definitions of Section 53G-8-210;

(b) written standards for student behavior expectations, including school and classroom management;

(c) effective instructional practices for teaching student expectations, including:

(i) self-discipline;

(ii) citizenship;

(iii) civic skills; and

(iv) social skills;

(d) systematic methods for reinforcement of expected behaviors;

(e) uniform methods for correction of student behavior;

(f) uniform methods for at least annual school level data-based evaluations of efficiency and effectiveness;

(g) an ongoing staff development program related to development of:

(i) student behavior expectations;

(ii) effective instructional practices for teaching and reinforcing behavior expectations;

(iii) effective intervention strategies; and

(iv) effective strategies for evaluation of the efficiency and effectiveness of interventions;

(h) procedures for ongoing training of appropriate school personnel in:

(i) crisis intervention training;

(ii) emergency safety intervention professional development; and

(iii) LEA policies related to emergency safety interventions consistent with evidence-based practice;

(i) policies and procedures relating to the use and abuse of alcohol and controlled substances by students;

(j) policies and procedures, consistent with requirements of Rule R277-613, related to:

(i) bullying;

(ii) cyber-bullying;

(iii) harassment;

(iv) hazing; and

(v) retaliation;

(k) policies and procedures for the use of emergency safety interventions for all students consistent with evidence-based practices including prohibition of:

(i) physical restraint, subject to the requirements of Section R277-609-5, except when a student:

(A) presents a danger of serious physical harm to self or others; or

(B) is destroying property;

(ii) prone, or face-down, physical restraint;

(iii) supine, or face-up, physical restraint;

(iv) physical restraint that obstructs the airway of a student or adversely affects a student's primary mode of communication;

(v) mechanical restraint, except:

(A) protective or stabilizing restraints;

(B) restraints required by law, including seatbelts or any other safety equipment when used to secure students during transportation; and

(C) any device used by a law enforcement officer in carrying out law enforcement duties;

(vi) chemical restraint, except as:

(A) prescribed by a licensed physician, or other qualified health professional acting under the scope of the professional's authority under State law, for the standard treatment of a student's medical or psychiatric condition; and

(B) administered as prescribed by the licensed physician or other qualified health professional acting under the scope of the professional's authority under state law;

(vii) seclusionary time out, subject to the requirements of Section R277-609-5, except when a student presents an immediate danger of serious physical harm to self or others; and

(viii) for a student with a disability, emergency safety interventions written into a student's IEP, as a planned intervention, unless:

(A) school personnel, the family, and the IEP team agree less restrictive means which meet circumstances described in Section R277-608-5 have been attempted;

(B) a FBA has been conducted; and

(C) a positive behavior intervention plan based on data analysis has been written into the plan and implemented.

(l) direction for dealing with bullying and disruptive students;

(m) direction for schools to determine the range of behaviors and establish the continuum of administrative procedures that may be used by school personnel to address the behavior of habitually disruptive students;

(n) identification, by position, of an individual designated to issue notices of disruptive and bullying student behavior;

(o) identification of individuals who shall receive notices of disruptive and bullying student behavior;

(p) a requirement to provide for documentation of disruptive student behavior prior to referral of disruptive students to juvenile court;

(q) strategies to provide for necessary adult supervision;

(r) a requirement that policies be clearly written and consistently enforced;

(s) notice to employees that violation of this rule may result in employee discipline or action;

(t) gang prevention and intervention policies in accordance with Subsection 53E-3-509 (1); and

(u) provisions that account for an individual LEA's or school's unique needs or circumstances, including:

(i) the role of law enforcement; and

(ii) emergency medical services; and

(iii) a provision for publication of notice to parents and school employees of policies by reasonable means.

(4) A plan described in Subsection (1) may include:

(a) the provisions of Subsection 53E-3-509 (2); and

(b) a plan for training administrators and school resource officers in accordance with Section 53A-11-1603.

R277-609-5. Physical restraint and seclusionary time out.

(1) When used consistently with an LEA plan under Subsection R277-609-4(1);

(a) a physical restraint must be immediately terminated when:

(i) a student is no longer an immediate danger to self or others; or

(ii) a student is in severe distress; and

(b) the use of physical restraint shall be for the minimum time necessary to ensure safety and a release criteria, as outlined in LEA policies, must be implemented.

(2) If a public education employee physically restrains a student, the school or the public education employee shall immediately notify:

(a) the student's parent or guardian; and

(b) school administration.

(3) A public education employee may not use physical restraint on a student for more than 30 minutes.

(4) In addition to the notice described in Subsection (2), if a public education employee physically restrains a student for more than fifteen minutes, the school or the public education employee shall immediately notify:

(a) the student's parent or guardian; and

(b) school administration.

(5) An LEA may not use physical restraint as a means of discipline or punishment.

(6) If a public education employee uses seclusionary time out, the public education employee shall:

(a) use the minimum time necessary to ensure safety;

(b) use release criteria as outlined in LEA policies;

(c) ensure that any door remains unlocked;

(d) maintain the student within line of sight of the public education employee;

(e) use the seclusionary time out consistent with the LEA's plan described in Section R277-609-4; and

(f) ensure that the enclosed area meets the fire and public safety requirements described in R392-200 and R710-4.

(7) If a student is placed in seclusionary time out, the school or the public education employee shall immediately notify:

(a) the student's parent or guardian; and

(b) school administration.

(8) A public education employee may not place a student in a seclusionary time out for more than 30 minutes.

(9) In addition to the notice described in Subsection (7), if a public education employee places a student in seclusionary time out for more than fifteen minutes, the school or the public education employee shall immediately notify:

(a) the student's parent or guardian; and

(b) school administration.

(10) Seclusionary time out may only be used for maintaining safety.

(11) A public education employee may not use seclusionary time out as a means of discipline or punishment.

R277-609-6. Implementation.

(1) An LEA shall implement strategies and policies consistent with the LEA's plan required in Section R277-609-4.

(2) An LEA shall develop, use and monitor a continuum of intervention strategies to assist students, including students whose behavior in school falls repeatedly short of reasonable expectations, by teaching student behavior expectations, reinforcing student behavior expectations, re-teaching behavior expectations, followed by effective, evidence-based interventions matched to student needs prior to administrative referral.

(3) An LEA shall implement positive behavior interventions and supports as part of the LEA's continuum of behavior interventions strategies.

(4)(a) An LEA shall provide a formal written assessment of a habitually disruptive student as part of a student's suspension or expulsion process that results in court involvement, once an LEA receives information from the court that disruptive student behavior will result in court action.

(b) An LEA shall use assessment information to connect parents and students with supportive school and community resources.

(5) Nothing in state law or this rule restricts an LEA from implementing policies to allow for suspension of students of any age consistent with due process requirements and consistent with all requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 2004.

(6) An LEA shall establish an Emergency Safety Intervention (ESI) Committee before September 1, 2015.

(7) The LEA ESI Committee:

(a) shall include:

(i) at least two administrators;

(ii) at least one parent or guardian of a student enrolled in the LEA, appointed by the LEA; and

(iii) at least two certified educational professionals with behavior training and knowledge in both state rules and LEA discipline policies;

(b) shall meet often enough to monitor the use of emergency safety intervention in the LEA;

(c) shall determine and recommend professional development needs; and

(d) shall develop policies for local dispute resolution processes to address concerns regarding disciplinary actions.

(8) An LEA shall have procedures for the collection, maintenance, and periodic review of documentation or records of the use of emergency safety interventions at schools within the LEA.

(9) The Superintendent shall define the procedures for the collection, maintenance, and review of records described in Subsection (8).

(10) An LEA shall provide documentation of any school, program or LEA's use of emergency safety interventions to the Superintendent annually.

R277-609-7. Special education exception(s) to this rule.

(1) An LEA shall have in place, as part of its LEA special education policies, procedures, or practices, criteria and steps for using emergency safety interventions consistent with state and federal law.

(2) The Superintendent shall periodically review:

(a) all LEA special education behavior intervention plans, procedures, or manuals; and

(b) emergency safety intervention data as related to IDEA eligible students in accordance with Utah's Program Improvement and Planning System.

R277-609-8. Parent/Guardian notification and court referral.

(1) Through school administrative and juvenile court referral consequences, LEA policies shall provide procedures for qualifying minors and their parents to participate in decisions regarding consequences for disruptive student behavior.

(2) An LEA shall establish policies that:

(a) provide notice to parents and information about resources available to assist a parent in resolving the parent's school-age minors' disruptive behavior;

(b) provide for notices of disruptive behavior to be issued by schools to qualifying minors and parents consistent with:

(i) numbers of disruptions and timelines in accordance with Section 53G-8-210;

(ii) school resources available;

(iii) cooperation from the appropriate juvenile court in accessing student school records, including:

(A) attendance;

(B) grades;

(C) behavioral reports; and

(D) other available student school data; and

(iv) provide due process procedures for minors and parents to contest allegations and citations of disruptive student behavior.

(3)(a) When a crisis situation occurs that requires the use of an emergency safety intervention to protect the student or others from harm, a school shall notify the LEA and the student's parent or guardian as soon as possible and no later than the end of the school day.

(b) In addition to the notice described in Subsection (3)(a), if a crisis situation occurs for more than fifteen minutes, the school shall immediately notify:

(i) the student's parent or guardian; and

(ii) school administration.

(d) A notice described in Subsection (3)(a) shall be documented within student information systems (SIS) records.

(4)(a) A school shall provide a parent or guardian with a copy of any notes or additional documentation taken during a crisis situation upon request of the parent or guardian.

(b) Within 24 hours of a crisis situation, a school shall notify a parent or guardian that the parent or guardian may request a copy of any notes or additional documentation taken during a crisis situation.

(c) A parent or guardian may request a time to meet with school staff and administration to discuss a crisis situation.

R277-609-9. Model policies.

(1) The Superintendent shall develop, review regularly, and provide to LEA boards model policies to address disruptive student behavior and appropriate consequences.

(2) The Superintendent shall provide technical assistance to LEAs in developing and implementing policies and training employees in the appropriate use of physical force and emergency safety interventions to the extent of resources available.

R277-609-10. LEA compliance.

If an LEA fails to comply with this rule, the Superintendent may withhold funds in accordance with Rule R277-114 or impose any other sanction authorized by law.

Sub Category
Alternative placements
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-8-207. Alternatives to suspension or expulsion.

(1) Each local school board or charter school governing board shall establish:

(a) policies providing that prior to suspending or expelling a student for repeated acts of willful disobedience, defiance of authority, or disruptive behavior which are not of such a violent or extreme nature that immediate removal is required, good faith efforts shall be made to implement a remedial discipline plan that would allow the student to remain in school; and

(b) alternatives to suspension, including policies that allow a student to remain in school under an in-school suspension program or under a program allowing the parent, with the consent of the student's teacher or teachers, to attend class with the student for a period of time specified by a designated school official.

(2) If the parent does not agree or fails to attend class with the student, the student shall be suspended in accordance with the conduct and discipline policies of the district or the school.

(3) The parent of a suspended student and the designated school official may enlist the cooperation of the Division of Child and Family Services, the juvenile court, or other appropriate state agencies, if necessary, in dealing with the student's suspension.

(4) The state superintendent, in cooperation with school districts and charter schools, shall:

(a) research methods of motivating and providing incentives to students that:

(i) directly and regularly reward or recognize appropriate behavior;

(ii) impose immediate and direct consequences on students who fail to comply with district or school standards of conduct; and

(iii) keep the students in school, or otherwise continue student learning with appropriate supervision or accountability;

(b) explore funding resources to implement methods of motivating and providing incentives to students that meet the criteria specified in Subsection (4)(a);

(c) evaluate the benefits and costs of methods of motivating and providing incentives to students that meet the criteria specified in Subsection (4)(a);

(d) publish a report that incorporates the research findings, provides model plans with suggested resource pools, and makes recommendations for local school boards and school personnel;

(e) submit the report described in Subsection (4)(d) to the Education Interim Committee; and

(f) maintain data for purposes of accountability, later reporting, and future analysis.

§ 53G-8-208. Student suspended or expelled -Responsibility of parent or guardian -Application for students with disabilities.

(1) If a student is suspended or expelled from a public school under this part for more than ten school days, the parent is responsible for undertaking an alternative education plan which will ensure that the student's education continues during the period of suspension or expulsion.

(2)(a) The parent shall work with designated school officials to determine how that responsibility might best be met through private education, an alternative program offered by or through the district or charter school, or other alternative which will reasonably meet the educational needs of the student.

(b) The parent and designated school official may enlist the cooperation of the Division of Child and Family Services, the juvenile court, or other appropriate state agencies to meet the student's educational needs.

(3) Costs for educational services which are not provided by the school district or charter school are the responsibility of the student's parent.

(4)(a) Each school district or charter school shall maintain a record of all suspended or expelled students and a notation of the recorded suspension or expulsion shall be attached to the individual student's transcript.

(b) The district or charter school shall contact the parent of each suspended or expelled student under the age of 16 at least once each month to determine the student's progress.

(5)(a) This part applies to students with disabilities to the extent permissible under applicable law or regulation.

(b) If application of any requirement of this part to a student with a disability is not permissible under applicable law or regulation, the responsible school authority shall implement other actions consistent with the conflicting law or regulation which shall most closely correspond to the requirements of this part.

REGULATIONS

R277-709-1. Authority and purpose.

(1) This rule is authorized by:

(a) Utah Constitution Article X, Section 3 which vests general control and supervision of public education in the Board;

(b) Subsection 53E-3-401(4), which allows the Board to make rules to execute the Board's duties and responsibilities under the Utah Constitution and state law; and

(c) Subsection 53E-3-503(2)(b) which requires the Board to adopt rules for the distribution of funds for the education of youth in custody.

(2) The purpose of this rule is to specify operation standards, procedures, and distribution of funds for youth in custody programs.

R277-709-2. Definitions.

(1) "Accreditation" means the formal process for evaluation and approval from a regional accrediting body.

(2) "Custody" means the status of being legally subject to the control of another person or a public agency.

(3)(a) "Youth in Custody" means a person for whom the Board is responsible to provide educational services under Subsections 53E-3-503(2)(a) and 62A-15-609(1).

(b) "Youth in custody" does not include a person taken into custody for the primary purpose of obtaining access to education programs provided for youth in custody.

R277-709-3. Student evaluation, education plans, and LEA programs.

(1) Each student meeting the eligibility definition of youth in custody shall have a written plan for college and career readiness defining the student's academic achievement, which shall specify known in-school and extra-school factors which may affect the student's school performance.

(2) A student, school staff and parent/guardian shall annually review the student's plan for college and career readiness maintained in the student's file.

(3) A program receiving a youth in custody student is responsible for obtaining the student's evaluation records, and, in cases where the records are not current, for conducting the evaluation, which may include a special education eligibility evaluation, as quickly as possible so that unnecessary delay in developing a student's education program is avoided.

(4) The LEA in which a youth in custody program is located has the responsibility to conduct IDEA child find activities within the program, consistent with Section R277-750-2 and Utah State Board of Education Special Education Rule II.A.

(5)(a) A youth in custody program shall prepare appropriate plan for college and career readiness and, as needed, an Individualized Education Program for each eligible youth in custody based upon the results of the student evaluation.

(b) A youth in custody program shall review and update the plans required under Subsection (5)(a) at least once each year or immediately following transfer of a student from one program to another, whichever is sooner.

(c) A youth in custody program shall develop the plans required under Subsection (5)(a) in cooperation with appropriate representatives of other service agencies working with a student.

(d) The plans required under Subsection (5)(a) shall specify the responsibilities of each of the agencies towards the student and shall be signed by each agency's representative.

(6)(a) All provisions of the IDEA and state special education rules apply to youth in custody programs.

(b) The USBE Special Education Department shall include youth in custody programs in annual general supervision monitoring annually.

(7)(a) An LEA shall provide an education program for the student which conforms as closely as possible to the student's education plan.

(b) An LEA shall provide educational services in the least restrictive environment appropriate for the student's behavior and educational performance.

(8) An LEA shall consider youth in custody who do not require educational services or supervision beyond students not in custody to be part of the district's regular enrollment and provided education services.

(9) An LEA shall not assign or allow youth in custody to remain in restrictive or non-mainstream programs simply because of:

(a) their custodial status;

(b) past behavior that does not put others at risk; or

(c) the inappropriate behavior of other students.

(10)(a) Education programs to which youth in custody are assigned shall meet the standards which are adopted by the Board for that type program.

(b) The Superintendent shall monitor compliance in periodic review visits.

(11) An LEA shall accept credit earned in youth in custody programs that are accredited at face value in Utah's public schools consistent with Section R277-410-9, Transfer or Acceptance of Credit.

(12) A youth in custody program shall sufficiently coordinate educational services with non-custody programs to enable youth in custody to continue their education with minimal disruption following discharge from custody.

(13)(a) A youth in custody program shall admit youth in custody to classes within five school days following arrival at a new residential placement.

(b) If a youth in custody program cannot complete an evaluation and plan for college and career readiness or IEP development within five school days, the program shall enroll the student temporarily based upon the best information available.

(c) A temporary schedule may be modified to meet the student's needs after the evaluation and planning process is complete.

(14)(a) Following a student's release from custody or transfer to a new program, the sending program shall bring all available school records up to date and forward them to the receiving program consistent with Section 53G-6-604.

(b) An LEA shall maintain all grades, attendance records and special education SCRAM records in the LEA's SIS system in compliance with Rule R277-484, Data Standards.

R277-709-4. Program fiscal and accountability procedures.

(1) The Superintendent shall allocate state funds appropriated for youth in custody, including the Utah State Hospital, in accordance with Section 53E-3-503and Section 62A-15-609.

(2) Funds appropriated for youth in custody programs shall be subject to Board accounting, auditing, and budgeting rules and policies.

(3) The Superintendent shall, through an annually submitted and approved state application and plan, contract with LEAs to provide educational services for youth in custody.

(a) A contract required by Subsection (3) shall include the respective responsibilities of the Board, LEAs, and other local service providers for education

(b) An LEA may subcontract with local non-district educational service providers for the provision of educational services.

(4) The Superintendent may only contract through an RFP process with an appropriate entity if the Board Superintendent determines that the LEA where the facility is located is unable or unwilling to provide adequate education services.

(5) Youth in custody students receiving education services by or through an LEA are students of that LEA.

(6) Notwithstanding the procedures for determining an alternative district of residency in Rule R277-621, an LEA may not create an alternative district of residency for a student who has been placed in custody primarily in an attempt to receive services in a state funded youth in custody program.

(7) The Superintendent shall allocate state funds appropriated for youth in custody on the basis of an annually submitted and approved application made by the LEA where a youth in custody program resides.

(8) The Superintendent shall base the share of funds distributed to an LEA upon criteria which include:

(a) the number of youth in custody served by the LEA;

(b) the type of program required for the youth;

(c) the setting for providing services; and

(d) the length of the program.

(9) A youth in custody program shall expend funds approved for youth in custody projects solely for the purposes described in the respective funding application.

(10) The Superintendent may retain no more than five percent of the total youth in custody annual legislative appropriation for administration, oversight, monitoring, and evaluation of youth in custody programs and their compliance with law and this rule.

(11) Up to three percent of the five percent of administrative funds allowed under Subsection (9) may be withheld by the Superintendent and directed to students attending youth in custody programs for short periods of time or to new or beginning youth in custody programs or initiatives benefitting youth in custody students.

(12) The Superintendent may withhold federal or state funds for noncompliance with state policy and procedures and associated reporting timelines in accordance with Rule R277-114.

(13) The Superintendent or its designee shall develop uniform forms, deadlines, reporting and accounting procedures and guidelines to govern the youth in custody school-based programs and Utah State Hospital funded programs.

R277-709-5. Youth in custody programs and students with disabilities.

(1) The youth in custody program is separate from and not conducted under the state's education program for students with disabilities.

(2) Custodial status alone does not qualify a youth in custody student as a student with a disability under laws regulating education for students with disabilities.

(3) Youth in custody students may be eligible for special education funding and services based upon special education rules and regulations.

(4) Youth in custody students qualifying for special education services shall receive educational instruction as defined in R277-750, Education Programs for Students with Disabilities.

(5) Special education procedural safeguards shall apply to all IDEA eligible youth in custody students regardless of instructional location.

(6) The Superintendent shall monitor special education programs provided through youth in custody programs on an annual basis in accordance with special education rules and policies.

R277-709-6. Youth in custody program staffing and monitoring.

(1) Education staff assigned to youth in custody shall be qualified and appropriate for their assignments accordance with Board licensing rules.

(2) Youth in custody programs shall maintain accreditation as part of the LEA where the programs are located consistent with Rule R277-410, Accreditation of Schools.

(3) The Superintendent shall evaluate youth in custody programs through regular site monitoring visits and monthly desk monitoring.

(4) Monitored programs shall prepare and submit to the Superintendent a written corrective action plan for each monitoring finding, as requested by the Superintendent.

(5) A youth in custody program's failure to resolve monitoring findings as soon as possible, and, in no case, later than one calendar year from date of notice, may result in the termination of state funding as provided in Rule R277-114.

(6) The Superintendent may review LEA or State Hospital records and practices for compliance with the law and this rule.

R277-709-7. Youth in custody/LEA fiscal procedures.

(1) Ten percent of state youth in custody funds or educational contract funds not expended in the current fiscal year may be carried over by eligible LEAs and spent in the next fiscal year with written approval of the Superintendent.

(2) An LEA shall submit a request to carry over funds for approval by August 1.

(3) If approved, an LEA shall detail carry over amounts in a revised budget submitted to the Superintendent no later than October 1 in the year requested.

(4) The Superintendent shall consider excess funds in determining the LEA's allocation for the next fiscal year.

(5)(a) The Superintendent shall annually recapture fund balances in excess of ten percent or $50,000 no later than February 1

(b) The Superintendent shall reallocate funds recaptured in accordance with Subsection (5)(a) to the youth in custody programs based on the criteria and procedures provided by this rule.

R277-709-8. Program, curriculum, outcomes and student mastery.

(1) Youth in custody programs shall offer courses consistent with the Utah Core standards under Rule R277-700.

(2) A youth in custody program may modify or adjust Utah core standards and teaching strategies to meet the individual needs of youth in custody students.

(3) Youth in custody programs shall stress course content mastery rather than completion of predetermined seat time in a classroom.

(4) The Superintendent shall make available written course descriptions for GED Test preparation for youth in custody students who consider pursuing GED Tests as an alternative to traditional Carnegie diploma courses.

R277-709-9. Confidentiality.

(1) An LEA shall issue transcripts and diplomas prepared for youth in custody in the name of an existing LEA, which also serves non-custodial youth and shall not bear references to custodial status.

(2) School records which refer to custodial status, juvenile court records, and related matters shall be kept separate from permanent school records, but are nonetheless student records if retained by the LEA.

(3)(a) Members of the interagency team which design and oversee student education plans shall have access, through team member representatives of the participating agencies, to relevant records of the various agencies.

(b) The records and information obtained from the records remain the property of the supplying agency and shall not be transferred or shared with other persons or agencies without the permission of the supplying agency, the student's legal guardian, or the eligible student as defined under 20 U.S.C. 1232g(d).

(4) Youth in custody programs shall comply with all state and federal privacy requirements for student records.

R277-709-10. Coordinating council.

(1)(a) The Department of Human Services and the Board shall appoint a coordinating council in accordance with Subsection 53E-3-503(6)(a)to plan, coordinate, and recommend budget, policy, and program guidelines for the education and treatment of persons in the custody of the Division of Juvenile Justice Services and the Division of Child and Family Services.

(b) The coordinating council shall operate under guidelines developed and approved by the Department of Human Services and the Board.

(2) Coordinating council membership shall include a representative of the following:

(a) the Department of Human Services;

(b) the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health;

(c) the Division of Juvenile Justice Services;

(d) the Division of Child and Family Services;

(e) the Board;

(f) the Administrative Office of the Courts;

(g) school district superintendents; and

(h) a Native American tribe.

R277-709-11. Advisory councils.

(1)(a) Each LEA serving youth in custody shall establish a local interagency advisory council which shall be responsible for advising member agencies concerning coordination of youth in custody programs.

(b) Members of council required under Subsection (1)(a) shall include, if applicable to the LEA, the following:

(i) a representative of the Division of Child and Family Services;

(ii) a representative of the Division of Juvenile Justice Services;

(iii) directors of agencies located in an LEA such as detention centers, secure lockup facilities, observation and assessment units, and the Utah State Hospital;

(iv) a representative of community-based alternative programs for custodial juveniles; and

(v) a representative of the LEA.

(2) A local interagency advisory council required under Subsection (1)(a) shall

(a) adopt by-laws for its operation; and

(b) meet at least quarterly.

Major Category
Disciplinary Approaches Addressing Specific Infractions and Conditions
Sub Category
Firearms (as required by the Guns-Free Schools Act)
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-8-510. Notification of teachers of weapons on school property -Immunity from civil and criminal liability.

(1) Whenever a student is found on school property during school hours or at a school-sponsored activity in possession of a dangerous weapon and that information is reported to or known by the principal, the principal shall notify law enforcement personnel and school or district personnel who, in the opinion of the principal, should be informed.

(2) A person who in good faith reports information under Subsection (1) and any person who receives the information is immune from any liability, civil or criminal, that might otherwise result from the reporting or receipt of the information.

§ 76-3-203.2. Definitions -Use of dangerous weapon in offenses committed on or about school premises -Enhanced penalties.

(1)(a) As used in this section "on or about school premises" means:

(i)(A) in a public or private elementary or secondary school; or

(B) on the grounds of any of those schools;

(ii)(A) in a public or private institution of higher education; or

(B) on the grounds of a public or private institution of higher education;

(iii) within 1,000 feet of any school, institution, or grounds included in Subsections (1)(a)(i) and (ii); and

(iv) in or on the grounds of a preschool or child care facility.

(b) As used in this section:

(i) "Dangerous weapon" has the same definition as in Section 76-1-601.

(ii) "Educator" means a person who is:

(A) employed by a public school district; and

(B) required to hold a certificate issued by the State Board of Education in order to perform duties of employment.

(iii) "Within the course of employment" means that an educator is providing services or engaging in conduct required by the educator's employer to perform the duties of employment.

(2) A person who, on or about school premises, commits an offense and uses or threatens to use a dangerous weapon, as defined in Section 76-1-601, in the commission of the offense is subject to an enhanced degree of offense as provided in Subsection (4).

(3)(a) A person who commits an offense against an educator when the educator is acting within the course of employment is subject to an enhanced degree of offense as provided in Subsection (4).

(b) As used in Subsection (3)(a), "offense" means:

(i) an offense under Title 76, Chapter 5, Offenses Against the Person; and

(ii) an offense under Title 76, Chapter 6, Part 3, Robbery.

(4) If the trier of fact finds beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant, while on or about school premises, commits an offense and in the commission of the offense uses or threatens to use a dangerous weapon, or that the defendant committed an offense against an educator when the educator was acting within the course of the educator's employment, the enhanced penalty for a:

(a) class B misdemeanor is a class A misdemeanor;

(b) class A misdemeanor is a third degree felony;

(c) third degree felony is a second degree felony; or

(d) second degree felony is a first degree felony.

(5) The enhanced penalty for a first degree felony offense of a convicted person:

(a) is imprisonment for a term of not less than five years and which may be for life, and imposition or execution of the sentence may not be suspended unless the court finds that the interests of justice would be best served and states the specific circumstances justifying the disposition on the record; and

(b) is subject also to the dangerous weapon enhancement provided in Section 76-3-203.8, except for an offense committed under Subsection (3) that does not involve a firearm.

(6) The prosecuting attorney, or grand jury if an indictment is returned, shall provide notice upon the information or indictment that the defendant is subject to the enhanced degree of offense or penalty under Subsection (4) or (5).

(7) In cases where an offense is enhanced under Subsection (4), or under Subsection (5)(a) for an offense committed under Subsection (2) that does not involve a firearm, the convicted person is not subject to the dangerous weapon enhancement in Section 76-3-203.8.

(8) The sentencing enhancement described in this section does not apply if:

(a) the offense for which the person is being sentenced is:

(i) a grievous sexual offense;

(ii) child kidnapping under Section 76-5-301.1;

(iii) aggravated kidnapping under Section 76-5-302; or

(iv) forcible sexual abuse under Section 76-5-404; and

(b) applying the sentencing enhancement provided for in this section would result in a lower maximum penalty than the penalty provided for under the section that describes the offense for which the person is being sentenced.

§ 76-10-505.5. Possession of a dangerous weapon, firearm, or short barreled shotgun on or about school premises–Penalties.

(1) As used in this section, "on or about school premises" means:

(a)(i) in a public or private elementary or secondary school; or

(ii) on the grounds of any of those schools;

(b)(i) in a public or private institution of higher education; or

(ii) on the grounds of a public or private institution of higher education; and

(iii)(A) inside the building where a preschool or child care is being held, if the entire building is being used for the operation of the preschool or child care; or

(B) if only a portion of a building is being used to operate a preschool or child care, in that room or rooms where the preschool or child care operation is being held.

(2) A person may not possess any dangerous weapon, firearm, or short barreled shotgun, as those terms are defined in Section 76-10-501, at a place that the person knows, or has reasonable cause to believe, is on or about school premises as defined in this section.

(3)(a) Possession of a dangerous weapon on or about school premises is a class B misdemeanor.

(b) Possession of a firearm or short barreled shotgun on or about school premises is a class A misdemeanor.

(4) This section does not apply if:

(a) the person is authorized to possess a firearm as provided under Section 53-5-704, 53-5-705, 76-10-511, or 76-10-523, or as otherwise authorized by law;

(b) the possession is approved by the responsible school administrator;

(c) the item is present or to be used in connection with a lawful, approved activity and is in the possession or under the control of the person responsible for its possession or use; or

(d) the possession is:

(i) at the person's place of residence or on the person's property; or

(ii) in any vehicle lawfully under the person's control, other than a vehicle owned by the school or used by the school to transport students.

(5) This section does not prohibit prosecution of a more serious weapons offense that may occur on or about school premises.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Other weapons
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-8-205. Grounds for suspension or expulsion from a public school.

(2)(a) A student shall be suspended or expelled from a public school for any of the following reasons:

(i) any serious violation affecting another student or a staff member, or any serious violation occurring in a school building, in or on school property, or in conjunction with any school activity, including:

(A) the possession, control, or actual or threatened use of a real weapon, explosive, or noxious or flammable material;

(B) the actual or threatened use of a look alike weapon with intent to intimidate another person or to disrupt normal school activities; or

(C) the sale, control, or distribution of a drug or controlled substance as defined in Section 58-37-2, an imitation controlled substance defined in Section 58-37b-2, or drug paraphernalia as defined in Section 58-37a-3; or

(ii) the commission of an act involving the use of force or the threatened use of force which if committed by an adult would be a felony or class A misdemeanor.

(b) A student who commits a violation of Subsection (2)(a) involving a real or look alike weapon, explosive, or flammable material shall be expelled from school for a period of not less than one year subject to the following:

(i) within 45 days after the expulsion the student shall appear before the student's local school board superintendent, the superintendent's designee, chief administrative officer of a charter school, or the chief administrative officer's designee, accompanied by a parent; and

(ii) the superintendent, chief administrator, or designee shall determine:

(A) what conditions must be met by the student and the student's parent for the student to return to school;

(B) if the student should be placed on probation in a regular or alternative school setting consistent with Section 53G-8-208, and what conditions must be met by the student in order to ensure the safety of students and faculty at the school the student is placed in; and

(C) if it would be in the best interest of both the school district or charter school, and the student, to modify the expulsion term to less than a year, conditioned on approval by the local school board or charter school governing board and giving highest priority to providing a safe school environment for all students[...]

§ 53G-8-510. Notification of teachers of weapons on school property -Immunity from civil and criminal liability.

(1) Whenever a student is found on school property during school hours or at a school-sponsored activity in possession of a dangerous weapon and that information is reported to or known by the principal, the principal shall notify law enforcement personnel and school or district personnel who, in the opinion of the principal, should be informed.

(2) A person who in good faith reports information under Subsection (1) and any person who receives the information is immune from any liability, civil or criminal, that might otherwise result from the reporting or receipt of the information.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Students with chronic disciplinary issues
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-6-203. Truancy -Notice of truancy -Failure to cooperate with school authorities -Habitual truant citation.

(1) Except as provided in Section 53G-6-204 or 53G-6-702, a school-age minor who is enrolled in a public school shall attend the public school in which the school-age minor is enrolled.

(2) A local school board, charter school governing board, or school district may impose administrative penalties on a school-age minor in accordance with Section 53G-8-211 who is truant.

(3) A local school board or charter school governing board:

(a) may authorize a school administrator, a designee of a school administrator, a law enforcement officer acting as a school resource officer, or a truancy specialist to issue notices of truancy to school-age minors who are at least 12 years old; and

(b) shall establish a procedure for a school-age minor, or the school-age minor's parents, to contest a notice of truancy.

(4) The notice of truancy described in Subsection (3):

(a) may not be issued until the school-age minor has been truant at least five times during the school year;

(b) may not be issued to a school-age minor who is less than 12 years old;

(c) may not be issued to a minor exempt from school attendance as provided in Section 53G-6-204 or 53G-6-702;

(d) shall direct the school-age minor and the parent of the school-age minor to:

(i) meet with school authorities to discuss the school-age minor's truancies; and

(ii) cooperate with the local school board, charter school governing board, or school district in securing regular attendance by the school-age minor; and

(e) shall be mailed to, or served on, the school-age minor's parent.

§ 53G-8-203. Conduct and discipline policies and procedures.

(1) The conduct and discipline policies required under Section 53G-8-202 shall include:

(h) standards and procedures for dealing with habitual disruptive or unsafe student behavior in accordance with the provisions of this part; and

§ 53G-8-210. Disruptive student behavior.

(1) As used in this section:

(a) "Disruptive student behavior" includes:

(i) the grounds for suspension or expulsion described in Section 53G-8-205; and

(ii) the conduct described inSubsection 53G-8-209 (2)(b) [...]

(2) A local school board, school district, charter school governing board, or charter school may impose administrative penalties on a school-age minor who violates this part.

(3)(a) A local school board or charter school governing board shall:

(i) authorize a school administrator or a designee of a school administrator to issue notices of disruptive student behavior to qualifying minors; and

(ii) establish a procedure for a qualifying minor, or a qualifying minor's parent, to contest a notice of disruptive student behavior.

(b) A school representative shall provide to a parent of a school-age minor, a list of resources available to assist the parent in resolving the school-age minor's disruptive student behavior problem.

(c) A local school board or charter school governing board shall establish procedures for a school counselor or other designated school representative to work with a qualifying minor who engages in disruptive student behavior in order to attempt to resolve the minor's disruptive student behavior problems before the qualifying minor becomes subject to the jurisdiction of the juvenile court as provided for under this section.

(4) The notice of disruptive student behavior described in Subsection (4)(a):

(a) shall be issued to a qualifying minor who:

(i) engages in disruptive student behavior, that does not result in suspension or expulsion, three times during the school year; or

(ii) engages in disruptive student behavior, that results in suspension or expulsion, once during the school year;

(b) shall require that the qualifying minor and a parent of the qualifying minor:

(i) meet with school authorities to discuss the qualifying minor's disruptive student behavior; and

(ii) cooperate with the local school board or charter school governing board in correcting the school-age minor's disruptive student behavior;

(c) shall contain a statement indicating:

(i) the number of additional times that, if the qualifying minor engages in disruptive student behavior that does not result in suspension or expulsion, will result in the qualifying minor receiving a habitual disruptive student behavior citation; and

(ii) that the qualifying minor will receive a habitual disruptive student behavior citation if the qualifying minor engages in disruptive student behavior that results in suspension or expulsion; and

(d) shall be mailed by certified mail to, or served on, a parent of the qualifying minor.

(5) A habitual disruptive student behavior citation:

(a) may only be issued to a qualifying minor who:

(i) engages in disruptive student behavior, that does not result in suspension or expulsion, at least six times during the school year;

(ii)(A) engages in disruptive student behavior, that does not result in suspension or expulsion, at least three times during the school year; and

(B) engages in disruptive student behavior, that results in suspension or expulsion, at least once during the school year; or

(iii) engages in disruptive student behavior, that results in suspension or expulsion, at least twice during the school year; and

(b) may only be issued by a school administrator, a designee of a school administrator, or a truancy specialist, who is authorized by a local school board or charter school governing board to issue habitual disruptive student behavior citations.

(6)(a) A qualifying minor to whom a habitual disruptive student behavior notice is issued under Subsection (5) may not be referred to the juvenile court.

(b) Within five days after the day on which a habitual disruptive student behavior notice is issued, a representative of the school district or charter school shall provide documentation, to a parent of the qualifying minor who receives the citation, of the efforts made by a school counselor or representative under Subsection (3)(c).

REGULATIONS

R277-609-4. LEA responsibility to develop plans.

(3) A plan described in Subsection (1) shall include:

(m) direction for schools to determine the range of behaviors and establish the continuum of administrative procedures that may be used by school personnel to address the behavior of habitually disruptive students;

Sub Category
Attendance and truancy
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-6-201. Definitions.

For purposes of this part:

(1)(a) “Absence” or “absent” means, consistent with Subsection (1)(b), failure of a school-age minor assigned to a class or class period to attend the entire class or class period.

(b) A school-age minor may not be considered absent under this part more than one time during one day.

(2) “Habitual truant” means a school-age minor who:

(a) is at least 12 years old;

(b) is subject to the requirements of Section 53G-6-202; and

(c)(i) is truant at least 10 times during one school year; or

(ii) fails to cooperate with efforts on the part of school authorities to resolve the minor's attendance problem as required under Section 53G-6-206.

(3) “Minor” means a person under the age of 18 years.

(4) “Parent” includes:

(a) a custodial parent of the minor;

(b) a legally appointed guardian of a minor; or

(c) any other person purporting to exercise any authority over the minor which could be exercised by a person described in Subsection (4)(a) or (b).

(5) “School-age minor” means a minor who:

(a) is at least six years old, but younger than 18 years old; and

(b) is not emancipated.

(6) “School year” means the period of time designated by a local school board or charter school governing board as the school year for the school where the school-age minor:

(a) is enrolled; or

(b) should be enrolled, if the school-age minor is not enrolled in school.

(7) “Truant” means absent without a valid excuse.

(8) “Truant minor” means a school-age minor who:

(a) is subject to the requirements of Section 53G-6-202 or 53G-6-203; and

(b) is truant.

(9) “Valid excuse” means:

(a) an illness, which may be either mental or physical;

(b) a family death;

(c) an approved school activity;

(d) an absence permitted by a school-age minor's:

(i) individualized education program, developed pursuant to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004, as amended; or

(ii) accommodation plan, developed pursuant to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended; or

(e) any other excuse established as valid by a local school board, charter school governing board, or school district.

§ 53G-6-202. Compulsory education.

(1) For purposes of this section:

(a) "Intentionally" is as defined in Section 76-2-103.

(b) "Recklessly" is as defined in Section 76-2-103.

(c) "Remainder of the school year" means the portion of the school year beginning on the day after the day on which the notice of compulsory education violation described in Subsection (3) is served and ending on the last day of the school year.

(d) "School-age child" means a school-age minor under the age of 14.

(2) Except as provided in Section 53G-6-204 or 53A-11-102.5, the parent of a school-age minor shall enroll and send the school-age minor to a public or regularly established private school.

(3) A school administrator, a designee of a school administrator, a law enforcement officer acting as a school resource officer, or a truancy specialist may issue a notice of compulsory education violation to a parent of a school-age child if the school-age child is absent without a valid excuse at least five times during the school year.

(4) The notice of compulsory education violation, described in Subsection (3):

(a) shall direct the parent of the school-age child to:

(i) meet with school authorities to discuss the school-age child's school attendance problems; and

(ii) cooperate with the local school board, charter school governing board, or school district in securing regular attendance by the school-age child;

(b) shall designate the school authorities with whom the parent is required to meet;

(c) shall state that it is a class B misdemeanor for the parent of the school-age child to intentionally or recklessly:

(i) fail to meet with the designated school authorities to discuss the school-age child's school attendance problems; or

(ii) fail to prevent the school-age child from being absent without a valid excuse five or more times during the remainder of the school year;

(d) shall be served on the school-age child's parent by personal service or certified mail; and

(e) may not be issued unless the school-age child has been truant at least five times during the school year.

(5) It is a class B misdemeanor for a parent of a school-age minor to intentionally or recklessly fail to enroll the school-age minor in school, unless the school-age minor is exempt from enrollment under Section 53G-6-204 or 53A-11-102.5.

(6) It is a class B misdemeanor for a parent of a school-age child to, after being served with a notice of compulsory education violation in accordance with Subsections (3) and (4), intentionally or recklessly:

(a) fail to meet with the school authorities designated in the notice of compulsory education violation to discuss the school-age child's school attendance problems; or

(b) fail to prevent the school-age child from being absent without a valid excuse five or more times during the remainder of the school year.

(7) A local school board, charter school governing board, or school district shall report violations of this section to the appropriate county or district attorney.

(8) If school personnel have reason to believe that, after a notice of compulsory education violation is issued, the parent has failed to make a good faith effort to ensure that the child receives an appropriate education, the issuer of the compulsory education violation shall report to the Division of Child and Family Services:

(a) identifying information of the child and the child's parent who received the notice of compulsory education violation;

(b) information regarding the longest number of consecutive school days the school-age minor has been absent from school and the percentage of school days the child has been absent during each relevant school term;

(c) whether the child has made adequate educational progress;

(d) whether the requirements of Section 53G-6-206 have been met;

(e) whether the child is two or more years behind the local public school's age group expectations in one or more basic skills; and

(f) whether the child is receiving special education services or systematic remediation efforts.

§ 53G-6-203. Truancy -Notice of truancy -Failure to cooperate with school authorities -Habitual truant citation.

(1) Except as provided in Section 53G-6-204 or 53G-6-702, a school-age minor who is enrolled in a public school shall attend the public school in which the school-age minor is enrolled.

(2) A local school board, charter school governing board, or school district may impose administrative penalties on a school-age minor in accordance with Section 53G-8-211 who is truant.

(3) A local school board or charter school governing board:

(a) may authorize a school administrator, a designee of a school administrator, a law enforcement officer acting as a school resource officer, or a truancy specialist to issue notices of truancy to school-age minors who are at least 12 years old; and

(b) shall establish a procedure for a school-age minor, or the school-age minor's parents, to contest a notice of truancy.

(4) The notice of truancy described in Subsection (3):

(a) may not be issued until the school-age minor has been truant at least five times during the school year;

(b) may not be issued to a school-age minor who is less than 12 years old;

(c) may not be issued to a minor exempt from school attendance as provided in Section 53G-6-204 or 53G-6-702;

(d) shall direct the school-age minor and the parent of the school-age minor to:

(i) meet with school authorities to discuss the school-age minor's truancies; and

(ii) cooperate with the local school board, charter school governing board, or school district in securing regular attendance by the school-age minor; and

(e) shall be mailed to, or served on, the school-age minor's parent.

§ 53G-6-204. Minors exempt from school attendance.

(1)(a) A local school board or charter school governing board may excuse a school-age minor from attendance for any of the following reasons:

(i) a school-age minor over age 16 may receive a partial release from school to enter employment, or attend a trade school, if the school-age minor has completed grade 8; or

(ii) on an annual basis, a school-age minor may receive a full release from attending a public, regularly established private, or part-time school or class if:

(A) the school-age minor has already completed the work required for graduation from high school, or has demonstrated mastery of required skills and competencies in accordance with Subsection 53A-15-102(1);

(B) the school-age minor is in a physical or mental condition, certified by a competent physician if required by the local school board or charter school governing board, which renders attendance inexpedient and impracticable;

(C) proper influences and adequate opportunities for education are provided in connection with the school-age minor's employment; or

(D) the district superintendent or charter school governing board has determined that a school-age minor over the age of 16 is unable to profit from attendance at school because of inability or a continuing negative attitude toward school regulations and discipline.

(b) A school-age minor receiving a partial release from school under Subsection (1)(a)(i) is required to attend:

(i) school part time as prescribed by the local school board or charter school governing board; or

(ii) a home school part time.

(c) In each case, evidence of reasons for granting an exemption under Subsection (1) must be sufficient to satisfy the local school board or charter school governing board.

(d) A local school board or charter school governing board that excuses a school-age minor from attendance as provided by this Subsection (1) shall issue a certificate that the minor is excused from attendance during the time specified on the certificate.

(2)(a) A local school board shall excuse a school-age minor from attendance, if the school-age minor's parent files a signed and notarized affidavit with the school-age minor's school district of residence, as defined in Section 53A-2-201, that:

(i) the school-age minor will attend a home school; and

(ii) the parent assumes sole responsibility for the education of the school-age minor, except to the extent the school-age minor is dual enrolled in a public school as provided in Section 53A-11-102.5.

(b) A signed and notarized affidavit filed in accordance with Subsection (2)(a) shall remain in effect as long as:

(i) the school-age minor attends a home school; and

(ii) the school district where the affidavit was filed remains the school-age minor's district of residence.

(c) A parent of a school-age minor who attends a home school is solely responsible for:

(i) the selection of instructional materials and textbooks;

(ii) the time, place, and method of instruction; and

(iii) the evaluation of the home school instruction.

(d) A local school board may not:

(i) require a parent of a school-age minor who attends a home school to maintain records of instruction or attendance;

(ii) require credentials for individuals providing home school instruction;

(iii) inspect home school facilities; or

(iv) require standardized or other testing of home school students.

(e) Upon the request of a parent, a local school board shall identify the knowledge, skills, and competencies a student is recommended to attain by grade level and subject area to assist the parent in achieving college and career readiness through home schooling.

(f) A local school board that excuses a school-age minor from attendance as provided by this Subsection (2) shall annually issue a certificate stating that the school-age minor is excused from attendance for the specified school year.

(g) A local school board shall issue a certificate excusing a school-age minor from attendance:

(i) within 30 days after receipt of a signed and notarized affidavit filed by the school-age minor's parent pursuant to this Subsection (2); and

(ii) on or before August 1 each year thereafter unless:

(A) the school-age minor enrolls in a school within the school district;

(B) the school-age minor's parent notifies the school district that the school-age minor no longer attends a home school; or

(C) the school-age minor's parent notifies the school district that the school-age minor's school district of residence has changed.

(3) A parent who files a signed and notarized affidavit as provided in Subsection (2)(a) is exempt from the application of Subsections 53G-6-202 (2), (5), and (6).

(4) Nothing in this section may be construed to prohibit or discourage voluntary cooperation, resource sharing, or testing opportunities between a school or school district and a parent of a minor attending a home school.

§ 53G-6-205. Preapproval of extended absence.

In determining whether to preapprove an extended absence of a school-age minor as a valid excuse under Subsection 53G-6-201 (9)(e), a local school board, charter school governing board, or school district shall approve the absence if the local school board, charter school governing board, or school district determines that the extended absence will not adversely impact the school-age minor's education.

§ 53G-6-206. Duties of a school board, local charter board, or school district in resolving attendance problems -Parental involvement -Liability not imposed.

(1)(a) Except as provided in Subsection (1)(b), a local school board, charter school governing board, or school district shall make efforts to resolve the school attendance problems of each school-age minor who is, or should be, enrolled in the school district.

(b) A minor exempt from school attendance under Section 53G-6-204 or 53G-6-702 is not considered to be a minor who is or should be enrolled in a school district or charter school under Subsection (1)(a).

(2) The efforts described in Subsection (1) shall include, as reasonably feasible:

(a) counseling of the minor by school authorities;

(b) issuing a notice of truancy to a school-age minor who is at least 12 years old, in accordance with Section 53G-6-203;

(c) issuing a notice of compulsory education violation to a parent of a school-age child, in accordance with Section 53G-6-202;

(d) making any necessary adjustment to the curriculum and schedule to meet special needs of the minor;

(e) considering alternatives proposed by a parent;

(f) monitoring school attendance of the minor;

(g) voluntary participation in truancy mediation, if available; and

(h) providing a school-age minor's parent, upon request, with a list of resources available to assist the parent in resolving the school-age minor's attendance problems.

(3) In addition to the efforts described in Subsection (2), the local school board, charter school governing board, or school district may enlist the assistance of community and law enforcement agencies as appropriate and reasonably feasible in accordance with Section 53G-8-211.

(4) This section does not impose civil liability on boards of education, local school boards, charter school governing boards, school districts, or their employees.

(5) Proceedings initiated under this part do not obligate or preclude action by the Division of Child and Family Services under Section 78A-6-319.

§ 53G-6-207. Truancy specialists.

A local school board or charter school governing board may appoint and fix the compensation of a truancy specialist to assist in enforcing laws related to school attendance and to perform other duties prescribed by law or the state board.

§ 53G-6-208. Taking custody of a person believed to be a truant minor -Disposition -Receiving centers -Reports -Immunity from liability.

(1) A peace officer or public-school administrator may take a minor into temporary custody if there is reason to believe the minor is a truant minor.

(2) An individual taking a school-age minor into custody under Subsection (1) shall, without unnecessary delay, release the minor to:

(a) the principal of the minor's school;

(b) a person who has been designated by the local school board or charter school governing board to receive and return the minor to school; or

(c) a truancy center established under Subsection (5).

(3) If the minor refuses to return to school or go to the truancy center, the officer or administrator shall, without unnecessary delay, notify the minor's parents and release the minor to their custody.

(4) If the parents cannot be reached or are unable or unwilling to accept custody and none of the options in Subsection (2) are available, the minor shall be referred to the Division of Child and Family Services.

(5)(a) A local school board or charter school governing board, singly or jointly with another school board, may establish or designate truancy centers within existing school buildings and staff the centers with existing teachers or staff to provide educational guidance and counseling for truant minors. Upon receipt of a truant minor, the center shall, without unnecessary delay, notify and direct the minor's parents to come to the center, pick up the minor, and return the minor to the school in which the minor is enrolled.

(b) If the parents cannot be reached or are unable or unwilling to comply with the request within a reasonable time, the center shall take such steps as are reasonably necessary to insure the safety and well being of the minor, including, when appropriate, returning the minor to school or referring the minor to the Division of Child and Family Services. A minor taken into custody under this section may not be placed in a detention center or other secure confinement facility.

(6) Action taken under this section shall be reported to the appropriate school district. The district shall promptly notify the minor's parents of the action taken.

(7) The Utah Governmental Immunity Act applies to all actions taken under this section.

(8) Nothing in this section may be construed to grant authority to a public school administrator to place a minor in the custody of the Division of Child and Family Services, without complying with Title 62A, Chapter 4a, Part 2, Child Welfare Services, and Title 78A, Chapter 6, Part 3, Abuse, Neglect, and Dependency Proceedings.

§ 53G-6-209. Truancy support centers.

(1) A school district may establish one or more truancy support centers for:

(a) truant minors taken into custody under Section 53G-6-208; or

(b) students suspended or expelled from school.

(2) A truancy support center shall provide services to the truant minor and the truant minor's family, including:

(a) assessments of the truant minor's needs and abilities;

(b) support for the parents and truant minor through counseling and community programs; and

(c) tutoring for the truant minor during the time spent at the center.

(3) For the suspended or expelled student, the truancy support center shall provide an educational setting, staffed with certified teachers and aides, to provide the student with ongoing educational programming appropriate to the student's grade level.

(4) In a district with a truancy support center, all students suspended or expelled from school shall be referred to the center. A parent shall appear with the student at the center within 48 hours of the suspension or expulsion, not including weekends or holidays. The student shall register and attend classes at the truancy support center for the duration of the suspension or expulsion unless the parent demonstrates that alternative arrangements have been made for the education or supervision of the student during the time of suspension or expulsion.

(5) The truancy support center may provide counseling and other support programming for students suspended or expelled from school and their parents or guardian.

REGULATIONS

R277-607-1. Authority and Purpose.

(1) This rule is authorized by:

(a) Utah Constitution Article X, Section 3 which vests general control and supervision over public education in the Board;

(b) Subsection 53E-3-401(4), which allows the Board to make rules to execute the Board's duties and responsibilities under the Utah Constitution and state; and

(c) Section 53G-6-206, which directs educational entities and parents working on behalf of children to make efforts to resolve school attendance problems of school-age minors who are or who should be enrolled in an LEA.

(2) The purpose of this rule is to direct an LEA to create policies for truancy procedures and compulsory education.

R277-607-2. Definitions.

(1) "Absence" means the same as that term is defined in Subsection 53G-6-201(1).

(2) "Habitual truant" means the same as that term is defined in Subsection 53G-6-201(2).

(3) "Habitual truant citation" is a citation issued only consistent with Section 53G-6-203.

(4) "Truant" means the same as that term is defined in Subsection 53G-6-201(7).

(5) "Unexcused absence" means a student's absence from school for reasons other than those authorized under the LEA policy.

(6) "Valid excuse" means the same as that term is defined in Subsection 53G-6-201(9).

R277-607-3. Truancy Policy Requirements.

(1) An LEA shall:

(a) develop a truancy policy that encourages regular, punctual attendance of students, consistent with Section 53G-8-211 and Title 53G Public Education System–Local Administration, Chapter 6 Participation in Public Schools, Part 2 Compulsory Education;

(b) review the LEA's truancy policy annually;

(c) review attendance data annually and consider revisions to the truancy policy to encourage student attendance; and

(d) make the truancy policy available for review by parents or interested parties.

(2) An LEA may issue a habitual truant citation to a student consistent with the LEA's truancy policy and Section 53G-6-203.

R277-607-4. Compulsory Education Procedures.

(1) An LEA shall develop compulsory education procedures as part of the LEA's truancy policy described in Section R277-607-3.

(2) The compulsory education procedures shall:

(a) provide a process for notice to parents about the truancy policy;

(b) require notice to parents regarding the progress of a student's discipline and consequences for violation of the truancy policy;

(c) provide an appeals process to contest:

(i) a notice of truancy; or

(ii) any disciplinary actions against a student pursuant to the truancy policy or;

(d) establish definitions not provided in law or this rule necessary to implement the truancy policy and compulsory education procedures;

(e) include definitions of "approved school activity" under Subsection 53G-6-201(9)(c) and "any other excuse" under Subsection 53G-6-201(9)(e);

(f) include criteria and procedures for preapproval of extended absences consistent with Section 53G-6-205; and

(g) establish programs and meaningful incentives which promote regular, punctual student attendance.

(3) An LEA shall publish the appeals process described in Subsection R277-607-4(2)(c) for use by a student or the student's parents.

Sub Category
Substance use
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-8-205. Grounds for suspension or expulsion from a public school.

(1) A student may be suspended or expelled from a public school for any of the following reasons:

(d) possession, control, or use of an alcoholic beverage as defined in Section 32B-1-102;

(2)(a) A student shall be suspended or expelled from a public school for any of the following reasons:

(C) the sale, control, or distribution of a drug or controlled substance as defined in Section 58-37-2, an imitation controlled substance defined in Section 58-37b-2, or drug paraphernalia as defined in Section 58-37a-3; [...]

§ 53G-8-505. Definitions.

(1) The definitions in Sections 58-37-2, 58-37a-3, and 58-37b-2 apply to this part.

(2) As used in this part:

(a) "Prohibited act" means an act punishable under Section 53G-4-402 , Section 58-37-8, Section 58-37a-5, or Title 58, Chapter 37b.

(b) "School" means a public or private elementary or secondary school.

§ 53G-8-602. Possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages at school or school-sponsored activities–Penalty.

(1) Except as approved by a local school board as part of the curriculum, a person may not possess or drink an alcoholic beverage:

(a) inside or on the grounds of any building owned or operated by a part of the public education system; or

(b) in those portions of any building, park, or stadium which are being used for an activity sponsored by or through any part of the public education system.

(2)(a) Subsection (1)(a) does not apply to property owned by a school district in contemplation of future use for school purposes while the property is under lease to another party.

(b)(i) For purposes of Subsection (2)(a), a lease must be full time for a period of not less than two years.

(ii) The property may not be used for school purposes at any time during the lease period.

(3) Violation of this section is a class B misdemeanor.

REGULATIONS

R277-609-4. LEA responsibility to develop plans.

(3) A plan described in Subsection (1) shall include:

(i) policies and procedures relating to the use and abuse of alcohol and controlled substances by students;

Sub Category
Bullying, harassment, or hazing
Statute

LAWS

§ 53B-17-1202. SafeUT Crisis Line established.

The University Neuropsychiatric Institute shall:

(1) establish a SafeUT Crisis Line to provide:

(a) a means for an individual to anonymously report:

(ii) incidents of bullying, cyber-bullying, harassment, or hazing; and

(2) provide the services described in Subsection (1) 24 hours a day, seven days a week; and

(3) when necessary, or as required by law, promptly forward a report received under Subsection (1)(a) to appropriate:

(a) school officials; and

(b) law enforcement officials.

§ 53G-9-601. Definitions.

As used in this part:

(1)(a) "Abusive conduct" means verbal, nonverbal, or physical conduct of a parent or student directed toward a school employee that, based on its severity, nature, and frequency of occurrence, a reasonable person would determine is intended to cause intimidation, humiliation, or unwarranted distress.

(b) A single act does not constitute abusive conduct.

(2) "Bullying" means a school employee or student intentionally committing a written, verbal, or physical act against a school employee or student that a reasonable person under the circumstances should know or reasonably foresee will have the effect of:

(a) causing physical or emotional harm to the school employee or student;

(b) causing damage to the school employee's or student's property;

(c) placing the school employee or student in reasonable fear of:

(i) harm to the school employee's or student's physical or emotional well-being; or

(ii) damage to the school employee's or student's property;

(d) creating a hostile, threatening, humiliating, or abusive educational environment due to:

(i) the pervasiveness, persistence, or severity of the actions; or

(ii) a power differential between the bully and the target; or

(e) substantially interfering with a student having a safe school environment that is necessary to facilitate educational performance, opportunities, or benefits.

(3) "Communication" means the conveyance of a message, whether verbal, written, or electronic.

(4) "Cyber-bullying" means using the Internet, a cell phone, or another device to send or post text, video, or an image with the intent or knowledge, or with reckless disregard, that the text, video, or image will hurt, embarrass, or threaten an individual, regardless of whether the individual directed, consented to, or acquiesced in the conduct, or voluntarily accessed the electronic communication.

(5)(a) "Hazing" means a school employee or student intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly committing an act or causing another individual to commit an act toward a school employee or student that:

(i)(A) endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a school employee or student;

(B) involves any brutality of a physical nature, including whipping, beating, branding, calisthenics, bruising, electric shocking, placing of a harmful substance on the body, or exposure to the elements;

(C) involves consumption of any food, alcoholic product, drug, or other substance or other physical activity that endangers the mental or physical health and safety of a school employee or student; or

(D) involves any activity that would subject a school employee or student to extreme mental stress, such as sleep deprivation, extended isolation from social contact, or conduct that subjects a school employee or student to extreme embarrassment, shame, or humiliation; and

(ii)(A) is committed for the purpose of initiation into, admission into, affiliation with, holding office in, or as a condition for membership in a school or school sponsored team, organization, program, club, or event; or

(B) is directed toward a school employee or student whom the individual who commits the act knows, at the time the act is committed, is a member of, or candidate for membership in, a school or school sponsored team, organization, program, club, or event in which the individual who commits the act also participates.

(b) The conduct described in Subsection (5)(a) constitutes hazing, regardless of whether the school employee or student against whom the conduct is committed directed, consented to, or acquiesced in, the conduct.

(6) "LEA governing board" means a local school board or charter school governing board.

(7) "Policy" means an LEA governing board policy described in Section 53G-9-605.

(8) "Retaliate" means an act or communication intended:

(a) as retribution against a person for reporting bullying or hazing; or

(b) to improperly influence the investigation of, or the response to, a report of bullying or hazing.

(9) "School" means a public elementary or secondary school, including a charter school.

(10) "School employee" means an individual working in the individual's official capacity as:

(a) a school teacher;

(b) a school staff member;

(c) a school administrator; or

(d) an individual:

(i) who is employed, directly or indirectly, by a school, an LEA governing board, or a school district; and

(ii) who works on a school campus.

§ 53G-9-602. Bullying, cyber-bullying, harassment, hazing, sexual battery, and sexual exposure prohibited.

(1) A school employee or student may not engage in bullying a school employee or student:

(a) on school property;

(b) at a school related or sponsored event;

(c) on a school bus;

(d) at a school bus stop; or

(e) while the school employee or student is traveling to or from a location or event described in Subsections (1)(a) through (d).

(2) A school employee or student may not engage in hazing or cyber-bullying a school employee or student at any time or in any location.

§ 53G-9-603. Retaliation and making false allegation prohibited.

(1) A school employee or student may not engage in retaliation against:

(a) a school employee;

(b) a student; or

(c) an investigator for, or a witness of, an alleged incident of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, or retaliation.

(2) A school employee or student may not make a false allegation of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, or retaliation against a school employee or student.

§ 53G-9-605. Bullying, cyber-bullying, harassment, hazing, and retaliation policy.

(1) On or before September 1, 2018, an LEA governing board shall update the LEA governing board's bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation policy to include abusive conduct.

(2) A policy shall:

(a) be developed only with input from:

(i) students;

(ii) parents;

(iii) teachers;

(iv) school administrators;

(v) school staff; or

(vi) local law enforcement agencies; and

(b) provide protection to a student, regardless of the student's legal status.

(3) A policy shall include the following components:

(a) definitions of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and abusive conduct that are consistent with this part;

(b) language prohibiting bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and abusive conduct;

(c) language prohibiting retaliation against an individual who reports conduct that is prohibited under this part;

(d) language prohibiting making a false report of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, or retaliation;

(e) as required in Section 53G-9-604, parental notification of:

(i) a student's threat to commit suicide; and

(ii) an incident of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, or retaliation, involving the parent's student;

(f) a grievance process for a school employee who has experienced abusive conduct;

(g) an action plan to address a reported incident of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, or retaliation; and

(h) a requirement for a signed statement annually, indicating that the individual signing the statement has received the LEA governing board's policy, from each:

(i) school employee;

(ii) student who is at least eight years old; and

(iii) parent of a student enrolled in the charter school or school district.

(4) A copy of a policy shall be:

(a) included in student conduct handbooks;

(b)included in employee handbooks; and

(c) provided to a parent or a guardian of a student enrolled in the charter school or school district.

(5) A policy may not permit formal disciplinary action that is based solely on an anonymous report of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, or retaliation.

(6) Nothing in this part is intended to infringe upon the right of a school employee, parent, or student to exercise the right of free speech.

§ 53G-9-608. Other forms of legal redress.

(1) Nothing in this part prohibits a victim of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, or retaliation from seeking legal redress under any other provisions of civil or criminal law.

(2) This section does not create or alter tort liability.

§ 76-5-107.5. Prohibition of "hazing"–Definitions–Penalties.

(1) A person is guilty of hazing if that person intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly commits an act or causes another to commit an act that:

(a)(i) endangers the mental or physical health or safety of another;

(ii) involves any brutality of a physical nature such as whipping, beating, branding, calisthenics, bruising, electric shocking, placing of a harmful substance on the body, or exposure to the elements;

(iii) involves consumption of any food, alcoholic product, drug, or other substance or any other physical activity that endangers the mental or physical health and safety of an individual; or

(iv) involves any activity that would subject the individual to extreme mental stress, such as sleep deprivation, extended isolation from social contact, or conduct that subjects another to extreme embarrassment, shame, or humiliation; and

(b)(i) is for the purpose of initiation, admission into, affiliation with, holding office in, or as a condition for continued membership in any organization; or

(ii) if the actor knew that the victim is a member of or candidate for membership with a school team or school organization to which the actor belongs or did belong within the preceding two years.

(2) It is not a defense to prosecution of hazing that a person under 21, against whom the hazing was directed, consented to or acquiesced in the hazing activity.

(3) An actor who hazes another is guilty of a:

(a) class B misdemeanor except as provided in Subsection (3)(b), (c), (d), or (e);

(b) class A misdemeanor if the act involves:

(i) the operation or other use of a motor vehicle;

(ii) the consumption of an alcoholic product as defined in Section 32B-1-102; or

(iii) the consumption of a drug or a substance as defined in Section 76-5-113;

(c) third degree felony if the act involves the use of a dangerous weapon as defined in Section 76-1-601;

(d) third degree felony if the hazing results in serious bodily injury to a person; or

(e) second degree felony if hazing under Subsection (3)(d) involves the use of a dangerous weapon as defined in Section 76-1-601.

(4) A person who in good faith reports or participates in reporting of an alleged hazing is not subject to any civil or criminal liability regarding the reporting.

(5)(a) This section does not apply to military training or other official military activities.

(b) Military conduct is governed by Title 39, Chapter 6, Utah Code of Military Justice.

(6)(a) A prosecution under this section does not bar a prosecution of the actor for:

(i) any other offense for which the actor may be liable as a party for conduct committed by the person hazed; or

(ii) any offense, caused in the course of the hazing, that the actor commits against the person who is hazed.

(b) Under Subsection (6)(a)(i) a person may be separately punished, both for the hazing offense and the conduct committed by the person hazed.

(c) Under Subsection (6)(a)(ii) a person may not be punished both for hazing and for the other offense, but shall be punished for the offense carrying the greater maximum penalty.

§ 76-9-201. Electronic communication harassment–Definitions–Penalties.

(1) As used in this section:

(a) "Adult" means an individual 18 years of age or older.

(b) "Electronic communication" means a communication by electronic, electro-mechanical, or electro-optical communication device for the transmission and reception of audio, image, or text but does not include broadcast transmissions or similar communications that are not targeted at a specific individual.

(c) "Electronic communication device" includes a telephone, a facsimile machine, electronic mail, a pager, a computer, or another device or medium that can be used to communicate electronically.

(d) "Minor" means an individual who is younger than 18 years of age.

(e) "Personal identifying information" means the same as that term is defined in Section 76-6-1102.

(2) A person is guilty of electronic communication harassment and subject to prosecution in the jurisdiction where the communication originated or was received if with intent to intimidate, abuse, threaten, harass, frighten, or disrupt the electronic communications of another, the person:

(a)(i) makes repeated contact by means of electronic communications, regardless of whether a conversation ensues; or

(ii) after the recipient has requested or informed the person not to contact the recipient, and the person repeatedly or continuously:

(A) contacts the electronic communication device of the recipient; or

(B) causes an electronic communication device of the recipient to ring or to receive other notification of attempted contact by means of electronic communication;

(b) makes contact by means of electronic communication and insults, taunts, or challenges the recipient of the communication or any person at the receiving location in a manner likely to provoke a violent or disorderly response;

(c) makes contact by means of electronic communication and threatens to inflict injury, physical harm, or damage to any person or the property of any person; or

(d) causes disruption, jamming, or overload of an electronic communication system through excessive message traffic or other means utilizing an electronic communication device.

(3) A person who electronically publishes, posts, or otherwise discloses personal identifying information of another individual in a public online site or forum with the intent to abuse, threaten, or disrupt the other individual's electronic communication and without the other individual's permission is guilty of electronic communication harassment.

(4)(a)(i) Electronic communication harassment committed against an adult is a class B misdemeanor, except under Subsection (4)(a)(ii).

(ii) A second or subsequent offense under Subsection (4)(a)(i) is:

(A) a class A misdemeanor if all prior violations of this section were committed against adults; and

(B) a third degree felony if a prior violation of this section was committed against a minor.

(b)(i) Electronic communication harassment committed against a minor is a class A misdemeanor, except as provided under Subsection (4)(b)(ii).

(ii) A second or subsequent offense under Subsection (4)(b)(i) is a third degree felony, regardless of whether a prior violation of this section was committed against a minor or an adult.

(5)(a) Except as provided under Subsection (5)(b), criminal prosecution under this section does not affect an individual's right to bring a civil action for damages suffered as a result of the commission of an offense under this section.

(b) This section does not create a civil cause of action based on electronic communications made for legitimate business purposes.

HB 372. 63C-21-101. Title.

(1) This chapter is known as the "Digital Wellness, Citizenship, and Safe Technology Commission."

(2) This part is known as "General Provisions."

HB 372. 63C-21-102. Definitions.

As used in this chapter:

(1) "Commission" means the Digital Wellness, Citizenship, and Safe Technology Commission created in Section 63C-21-201.

(2) "Cyber-bullying" means the same as that term is defined in Section 53G-9-601.

(3) "Digital citizenship" means the norms of appropriate, responsible, and healthy behavior related to technology use, including digital literacy, ethics, etiquette, and security.

(4) "Local education agency" or "LEA" means a school district, a charter school, or the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind.

(5) "State board" means the State Board of Education.

(6) "State superintendent" means the state superintendent of public instruction appointed under Section 53E-3-301.

(7) "Student" means a child who is under the age of 18.

HB 372. 63C-21-201. Commission established–Members.

(1) There is created the Digital Wellness, Citizenship, and Safe Technology Commission to advance the goal of reaching every student, parent, and student's support network with training and ongoing support in digital citizenship, composed of the following 11 members:

(a) one member of the Senate, appointed by the president of the Senate who shall serve as co-chair of the commission;

(b) one member of the House of Representatives, appointed by the speaker of the House of Representatives who shall serve as co-chair of the commission;

(c) two members appointed by the state superintendent, that may include:

(i) a current or former classroom teacher; and

(ii) a parent of a student;

(d) the governor or the governor's designee;

(e) the attorney general or the attorney general's designee; and

(f) five members with experience and expertise related to digital citizenship training and education, recommended by the co-chairs of the commission and jointly approved by the president of the Senate and the speaker of the House of Representatives, that may include:

(i) a mental health professional;

(ii) a facilitator of a school community council;

(iii) a media literacy librarian; and

(iv) a representative of the Utah Education and Telehealth Network created in Section 53B-17-105.

(2)(a) A majority of the members of the commission constitutes a quorum of the commission.

(b) The action by a majority of the members of a quorum constitutes the action of the commission.

(3)(a) The salary and expenses of a commission member who is a legislator shall be paid in accordance with Section 36-2-2 and Legislative Joint Rules, Title 5, Chapter 3, Legislator Compensation.

(b) A commission member who is not a legislator may not receive compensation or benefits for the member's service on the commission, but may receive per diem and reimbursement for travel expenses incurred as a commission member at the rates established by the Division of Finance under:

(i) Sections 63A-3-106 and 63A-3-107; and

(ii) rules made by the Division of Finance pursuant to Sections 63A-3-106 and 63A-3-107.

(4) The Office of Legislative Research and General Counsel shall provide staff support to the commission.

(5) The commission shall meet up to seven times per year.

HB 372. 63C-21-202. Commission duties–Reporting requirements.

(1) To ensure students are digital media-literate, and able to use technology safely and ethically, the commission shall:

(a) identify best practices for reaching every student with training in digital citizenship;

(b) identify, compile, and publish resources that an LEA or a parent may use to educate students, parents, or a student's support network in digital citizenship;

(c) identify and compile emerging research on digital citizenship and educating students, parents, or a student's support network in digital citizenship;

(d) collaborate and coordinate efforts with programs related to cyber-bullying, suicide prevention, anti-pornography, and social and emotional learning to provide resources for promoting digital citizenship to LEAs, students, teachers, and parents; and

(e) administer funds appropriated by the Legislature for the purposes described in this part, in accordance with the intent of the Legislature for the appropriation.

(2) The commission shall annually report to the Education Interim Committee and the state board on:

(a) objectives for training students in digital citizenship;

(b) a template for a plan that an LEA may use to achieve the objectives described in Subsection (2)(a);

(c) involving parents in promoting digital citizenship, including resources for educating students and parents at home;

(d) approved providers to deliver training in digital citizenship to teachers and students in LEAs; and

(e) the expenditure of the funds described in Subsection (1)(e).;lll

REGULATIONS

R277-609-4. LEA responsibility to develop plans.

(1) An LEA or school shall develop and implement a board approved comprehensive LEA plan or policy for student and classroom management, and school discipline.

(3) A plan described in Subsection (1) shall include:

(j) policies and procedures, consistent with requirements of Rule R277-613, related to:

(i) bullying;

(ii) cyber-bullying;

(iii) harassment;

(iv) hazing; and

(v) retaliation;

(l) direction for dealing with bullying and disruptive students;

(m) direction for schools to determine the range of behaviors and establish the continuum of administrative procedures that may be used by school personnel to address the behavior of habitually disruptive students;

(n) identification, by position, of an individual designated to issue notices of disruptive and bullying student behavior;

(o) identification of individuals who shall receive notices of disruptive and bullying student behavior;

R277-613-1. Authority and Purpose.

(1) This rule is authorized by:

(a) Utah Constitution Article X, Section 3, which vests general control and supervision over public education in the Board; and

(b) Subsection ,53E-3-401(4)(a) which allows the Board to make rules to execute the Board's duties and responsibilities under the Utah Constitution and state law.

(2) The purpose of the rule is to:

(a) require LEAs to develop, update, and implement bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, retaliation, and abusive conduct policies at the school district and school level;

(b) provide for regular and meaningful training of school employees and students;

(c) provide for enforcement of the policies in schools, at the state level and in public school athletic programs; and

(d) require an LEA to review allegations of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, retaliation, and abusive conduct.

R277-613-2. Definitions.

(1) "Abusive conduct" means the same as that term is defined in Subsection 53G-9-601(1).

(2)(a) "Bullying" means the same as that term is defined in Subsection 53G-9-601(2).

(b) "Bullying" includes relational aggression or indirect, covert, or social aggression, including rumor spreading, intimidation, enlisting a friend to assault a child, and social isolation.

(c) The conduct described in Subsection 53G-9-601(2) constitutes bullying, regardless of whether the person against whom the conduct is committed directed, consented to, or acquiesced in, the conduct.

(3) "Civil rights violations," for purposes of this rule, means bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, or retaliation that is targeted at a federally protected class.

(4) "Cyber-bullying" means the same as that term is defined in Subsection 53G-9-601(4).

(5) "Disruptive student behavior" means the same as that term is defined in Subsection 53G-8-210(1)(a).

(6) "Federally protected class" means any group protected from discrimination under the following federal laws:

(a) Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, or national origin;

(b) Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex;

(c) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability; and

(d) other areas included under these acts described in Subsection (5)(a) through (c), which prohibit discrimination on the basis of religion.

(7) "Hazing" means the same as that term is defined in Subsection 53G-9-601(5).

(8) "LEA" includes, for purposes of this rule, the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind.

(9) "Participant" means any student, employee or volunteer coach participating in a public school sponsored athletic program or activity, including a curricular, co-curricular, or extracurricular club or activity.

(10) "Policy" means standards and procedures that:

(a) are required in Section 53G-9-605;

(b) include the provisions of Section 53G-8-202; and

(c) provide additional standards, procedures, and training adopted in an open meeting by an LEA board that:

(i) define bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, retaliation, and abusive conduct; and

(ii) prohibit bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, retaliation, and abusive conduct;

(iii) require regular annual discussion and training designed to prevent bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation among school employees and students; and

(iv) provide for enforcement through employment action or student discipline.

(11) "Restorative justice practice" means a discipline practice that brings together students, school personnel, families, and community members to resolve conflicts, address disruptive behaviors, promote positive relationships, and healing.

(12) "Retaliate" or "retaliation" means the same as that term is defined in Subsection 53G-9-601(7).

(13) "School employee" means the same as that term is defined in Subsection 53G-9-601(10).

(14) "Trauma-Informed Care" means a strengths-based service delivery approach that is grounded in an understanding of and responsiveness to the impact of trauma, that emphasizes physical, psychological, and emotional safety for both the alleged targeted individual and the individual who is alleged to have engaged in prohibited conduct, and that creates opportunities for targets to rebuild a sense of control and empowerment.

R277-613-3. Superintendent Responsibilities.

(1) Subject to availability of funds, the Superintendent shall provide:

(a) a model policy on bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation as required in Section 53G-9-606;

(b) model training and training opportunities on:

(i) the prevention and identification of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation, that an LEA may use to train the LEA's employees, contract employees, and volunteers, including coaches; and

(ii) the reporting and review requirements in Section R277-613-5;

(c) evidence-based practices and policies related to the prevention of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation.

(2) Although an LEA is required to have a policy on bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, retaliation and abusive conduct as described in Section 53G-9-605 and this rule and provide training as described in Section 53G-9-607 and this rule, the LEA is not required to use the model policy or model training developed by the Superintendent described in Subsection (1).

(3) The Board may interrupt disbursements of funds consistent with Subsection 53E-3-401(8) and Rule R277-114 for failure of an LEA to comply with:

(a) Title 53G, Chapter 9, Bullying and Hazing; and

(b) this rule.

(4) In addition to the requirements of Title 53G, Chapter 9, Bullying and Hazing and this R277-613, LEAs are required to comply with applicable federal requirements.

R277-613-4. LEA Responsibility to Create or Update Bullying Policies.

(1) In addition to the requirements of Subsection 53G-9-605(3), an LEA shall:

(a) develop, update, and implement policies as required by Subsection 53G-9-605 and this rule, which shall include a prohibition on:

(i) bullying;

(ii) cyber-bullying;

(iii) hazing;

(iv) retaliation; and

(v) making a false report.

(b) post a copy of the LEA's policy on the LEA website;

(c) develop an action plan to address a reported incident of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, or retaliation; and

(d) provide a requirement for a signed statement that meets the requirements of Subsection 53G-9-605(3)(h) annually.

(2)(a) As required by Section 53G-9-605, an LEA shall notify a parent of:

(i) a parent's student's threat to commit suicide; or

(ii) an incident of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, or retaliation involving the parent's student as a targeted individual or an individual who is alleged to have engaged in prohibited conduct.

(b) An LEA shall:

(i) notify a parent described in Subsection (2)(a) in a timely manner;

(ii) designate the appropriate school employee to provide parental notification; and

(iii) designate the format in which notification is provided to parents and maintained by the LEA.

(3) Subject to the parental consent requirements of Section 53E-9-203, if applicable, an LEA shall assess students about the prevalence of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation in LEAs and schools, specifically locations where students are unsafe and additional adult supervision may be required, such as playgrounds, hallways, and lunch areas.

(4) An LEA shall take strong responsive action against retaliation, including assistance to targeted individuals and their parents in reporting subsequent problems and new incidents.

(5)(a) An LEA shall provide that students, school employees, coaches, and volunteers receive training on bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation, from individuals qualified to provide such training.

(b) The training described in Subsection (5)(a) shall:

(i) include information on various types of aggression and bullying, including:

(A) overt aggression that may include physical fighting such as punching, shoving, kicking, and verbal threatening behavior, such as name calling, or both physical and verbal aggression or threatening behavior;

(B) relational aggression or indirect, covert, or social aggression, including rumor spreading, intimidation, enlisting a friend to assault a child, and social isolation;

(C) sexual aggression or acts of a sexual nature or with sexual overtones;

(D) cyber-bullying, including use of email, web pages, text messaging, instant messaging, social media, three-way calling or messaging or any other electronic means for aggression inside or outside of school; and

(E) civil rights violations, including bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation based upon the students' or employees' actual or perceived identities and conformance or failure to conform with stereotypes;

(ii) complement the suicide prevention program required for students under Rule R277-620 and the suicide prevention training required for licensed educators consistent with Subsection 53G-9-704(1); and

(iii) include information on when issues relating to this rule may lead to student or employee discipline.

(6) The training described in Subsection (5) shall be offered to:

(a) new school employees, coaches, and volunteers; and

(b) all school employees, coaches, and volunteers at least once every three years.

(7)(a) An LEA's policies developed under this section shall complement existing school policies and research-based school discipline plans.

(b) Consistent with Rule R277-609, the discipline plan shall provide direction for dealing with bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, retaliation and disruptive students.

(c) An LEA shall ensure that a discipline plan required by Rule R277-609:

(i) directs schools to determine the range of behaviors and establish the continuum of administrative procedures to be used by school personnel to address the behavior of students;

(ii) provides for identification, by position, of individuals designated to issue notices of disruptive student behavior, bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation;

(iii) designates to whom notices shall be provided;

(iv) provides for documentation of disruptive student behavior in the LEA's student information system;

(v) includes strategies to provide for necessary adult supervision;

(vi) is clearly written and consistently enforced; and

(vii) includes administration, instruction and support staff, students, parents, community council and other community members in policy development, training and prevention implementation so as to create a community sense of participation, ownership, support and responsibility.

R277-613-5. Reporting and Incident Review of Allegations of Bullying, Cyber-bullying, Hazing, and Retaliation.

(1) In accordance with an action plan adopted in accordance with Subsection R277-613-4(1)(c), an LEA shall:

(a) review allegations of incidents of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation in accordance with this section; and

(b) provide an individual who reviews allegations of incidents of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation with adequate training on conducting a review.

(2)(a) An LEA shall review allegations of incidents described in Subsection (1)(a) by interviewing at least the alleged targeted individual and the individual who is alleged to have engaged in prohibited conduct.

(b) An LEA may also interview the following as part of a review:

(i) parents of the alleged targeted individual and the individual who is alleged to have engaged in prohibited conduct;

(ii) any witnesses;

(iii) school staff; and

(iv) other individuals who may provide additional information.

(c) An individual who reviews an allegation of an incident shall inform an individual being interviewed that:

(i) to the extent allowed by law, the individual is required to keep all details of the interview confidential; and

(ii) further reports of bullying will become part of the review.

(3) The confidentiality requirement in Subsection (2)(c) does not apply to:

(a) conversations with law enforcement professionals;

(b) requests for information pursuant to a warrant or subpoena;

(c) a state or federal reporting requirement; or

(d) other reporting required by this rule.

(4) In conducting a review under this section, an LEA may:

(a) review disciplinary reports of involved students; and

(b) review physical evidence, which may include:

(i) video or audio;

(ii) notes;

(iii) email;

(iv) text messages;

(v) social media; or

(vi) graffiti.

(5) An LEA shall adopt a policy outlining under what circumstances the LEA will report incidents of bullying, cyber-bullying, harassment, and retaliation to law enforcement.

(6) Following a review of a confirmed allegation of an incident of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, or retaliation, if appropriate, an LEA may:

(a) in accordance with the requirements in Subsection (6), take positive restorative justice practice action, in accordance with policies established by the LEA; and

(b) support involved students through trauma-informed practices, if appropriate.

(6)(a) An alleged targeted individual is not required to participate in a restorative justice practice with an individual who is alleged to have engaged in prohibited conduct as described in Subsection (5)(a).

(b) If an LEA would like an alleged targeted individual who is a student to participate in a restorative justice practice, the LEA shall notify the alleged targeted individual's parent of the restorative justice practice and obtain consent from the alleged targeted individual's parent before including the alleged targeted individual in the process.

(7) A grievance process required under Subsection 53G-9-605(3)(f) shall be consistent with the LEA's established grievance process.

(8) An LEA shall, as required by Subsection 53G-9-606(2), report the following annually, on or before June 30, to the Superintendent in accordance with the Superintendent's submission requirements:

(a) a copy of LEA's policy required in Section R277-613-4;

(b) implementation of the signed statement requirement described in Subsection 53G-9-605(3)(h);

(c) verification of the LEA's training of school employees relating to bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation described in Section 53G-9-607;

(d) incidents of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation; and

(e) the number of incidents described in Subsection (8)(d) that included a student who:

(i) is part of a federally protected class; or

(ii) was bullied, cyber-bullied, hazed, or retaliated against because the of the student's disability, race, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity, or sexual orientation.

R277-613-6. Training by LEAs Specific to Participants in Public School Athletic Programs and School Clubs.

(1)(a) Prior to any student, employee or volunteer coach participating in a public school sponsored athletic program, both curricular and extracurricular, or extracurricular club or activity, the student, employee or coach shall participate in bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation prevention training.

(b) A training described in Subsection (1)(a) shall be offered to new participants on an annual basis and to all participants at least once every three years.

(2) An LEA shall inform student athletes and extracurricular club members of prohibited activities under this rule and potential consequences for violation of the law and the rule.

(3) An LEA shall maintain training participant lists or signatures, to be provided to the Board upon request.

R277-613-7. Abusive Conduct.

(1) An LEA shall prohibit abusive conduct.

(2) An LEA's bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, and retaliation policy, required in Section 53G-9-605 and this rule, shall include a grievance process for a school employee who has experienced abusive conduct as described in Subsection 53G-9-605(3)(f).

Sub Category
Other special infractions or conditions
Statute

LAWS

§ 53E-3-509. Gang prevention and intervention policies.

(1)(a) The state board shall adopt rules that require a local school board or charter school governing board to enact gang prevention and intervention policies for all schools within the state board's jurisdiction.

(b) The rules described in Subsection (1)(a) shall provide that the gang prevention and intervention policies of a local school board or charter school governing board may include provisions that reflect the individual school district's or charter school's unique needs or circumstances.

(2) The rules described in Subsection (1) may include the following provisions:

(a) school faculty and personnel shall report suspected gang activities relating to the school and its students to a school administrator and law enforcement;

(b) a student who participates in gang activities may be excluded from participation in extracurricular activities, including interscholastic athletics, as determined by the school administration after consultation with law enforcement;

(c) gang-related graffiti or damage to school property shall result in parent notification and appropriate administrative and law enforcement actions, which may include obtaining restitution from those responsible for the damage;

(d) if a serious gang-related incident, as determined by the school administrator in consultation with local law enforcement, occurs on school property, at school related activities, or on a site that is normally considered to be under school control, notification shall be provided to parents of students in the school:

(i) informing them, in general terms, about the incident, but removing all personally identifiable information about students from the notice;

(ii) emphasizing the school's concern for safety; and

(iii) outlining the action taken at the school regarding the incident;

(e) school faculty and personnel shall be trained by experienced evidence based trainers that may include community gang specialists and law enforcement as part of comprehensive strategies to recognize early warning signs for youth in trouble and help students resist serious involvement in undesirable activity, including joining gangs or mimicking gang behavior;

(f) prohibitions on the following behavior:

(i) advocating or promoting a gang or any gang-related activities;

(ii) marking school property, books, or school work with gang names, slogans, or signs;

(iii) conducting gang initiations;

(iv) threatening another person with bodily injury or inflicting bodily injury on another in connection with a gang or gang-related activity;

(v) aiding or abetting an activity described under Subsections (2)(f)(i) through (iv) by a person's presence or support;

(vi) displaying or wearing common gang apparel, common dress, or identifying signs or symbols on one's clothing, person, or personal property that is disruptive to the school environment; and

(vii) communicating in any method, including verbal, non-verbal, and electronic means, designed to convey gang membership or affiliation.

(3) The rules described in Subsection (1) may require a local school board or charter school governing board to publicize the policies enacted by the local school board or charter school governing board in accordance with the rules described in Subsection (1) to all students, parents, and faculty through school websites, handbooks, letters to parents, or other reasonable means of communication.

(4) The state board may consult with appropriate committees, including committees that provide opportunities for the input of parents, law enforcement, and community agencies, as it develops, enacts, and administers the rules described in Subsection (1).

§ 53G-8-203. Conduct and discipline policies and procedures.

(1) The conduct and discipline policies required under Section 53G-8-202 shall include:

(a) provisions governing student conduct, safety, and welfare;

(b) standards and procedures for dealing with students who cause disruption in the classroom, on school grounds, on school vehicles, or in connection with school-related activities or events;

(c) procedures for the development of remedial discipline plans for students who cause a disruption at any of the places referred to in Subsection (1)(b);

(d) procedures for the use of reasonable and necessary physical restraint in dealing with students posing a danger to themselves or others, consistent with Section 53G-8-302;

(e) standards and procedures for dealing with student conduct in locations other than those referred to in Subsection (1)(b), if the conduct threatens harm or does harm to:

(i) the school;

(ii) school property;

(iii) a person associated with the school; or

(iv) property associated with a person described in Subsection (1)(e)(iii);

(f) procedures for the imposition of disciplinary sanctions, including suspension and expulsion;

(g) specific provisions, consistent with Section 53E-3-509, for preventing and responding to gang-related activities in the school, on school grounds, on school vehicles, or in connection with school-related activities or events;

(h) standards and procedures for dealing with habitual disruptive or unsafe student behavior in accordance with the provisions of this part; and

(i) procedures for responding to reports received through the SafeUT Crisis Line under Subsection 53B-17-1202(3).

(2)(a) Each local school board shall establish a policy on detaining students after regular school hours as a part of the district-wide discipline plan required under Section 53G-8-202.

(b)(i) The policy described in Subsection (2)(a) shall apply to elementary school students, grades kindergarten through six.

(ii) The board shall receive input from teachers, school administrators, and parents of the affected students before adopting the policy.

(c) The policy described in Subsection (2)(a) shall provide for:

(i) notice to the parent of a student prior to holding the student after school on a particular day; and

(ii) exceptions to the notice provision if detention is necessary for the student's health or safety.

§ 53G-8-209. Extracurricular activities -Prohibited conduct -Reporting of violations -Limitation of liability.

(1) The Legislature recognizes that:

(a) participation in student government and extracurricular activities may confer important educational and lifetime benefits upon students, and encourages school districts and charter schools to provide a variety of opportunities for all students to participate in such activities in meaningful ways;

(b) there is no constitutional right to participate in these types of activities, and does not through this section or any other provision of law create such a right;

(c) students who participate in student government and extracurricular activities, particularly competitive athletics, and the adult coaches, advisors, and assistants who direct those activities, become role models for others in the school and community;

(d) these individuals often play major roles in establishing standards of acceptable behavior in the school and community, and establishing and maintaining the reputation of the school and the level of community confidence and support afforded the school; and

(e) it is of the utmost importance that those involved in student government, whether as officers or advisors, and those involved in competitive athletics and related activities, whether students or staff, comply with all applicable laws and standards of behavior and conduct themselves at all times in a manner befitting their positions and responsibilities.

(2)(a) The state board may, and local school boards and charter school governing boards shall, adopt rules or policies implementing this section that apply to both students and staff.

(b) The rules or policies described in Subsection (2)(a) shall include prohibitions against the following types of conduct in accordance with Section 53G-8-211, while in the classroom, on school property, during school sponsored activities, or regardless of the location or circumstance, affecting a person or property described in Subsections 53G-8-203(1)(e)(i) through (iv):

(i) use of foul, abusive, or profane language while engaged in school related activities;

(ii) illicit use, possession, or distribution of controlled substances or drug paraphernalia, and the use, possession, or distribution of an electronic cigarette as defined in Section 76-10-101, tobacco, or alcoholic beverages contrary to law; and

(iii) hazing, demeaning, or assaultive behavior, whether consensual or not, including behavior involving physical violence, restraint, improper touching, or inappropriate exposure of body parts not normally exposed in public settings, forced ingestion of any substance, or any act which would constitute a crime against a person or public order under Utah law.

(3)(a) School employees who reasonably believe that a violation of this section may have occurred shall immediately report that belief to the school principal, district superintendent, or chief administrative officer of a charter school.

(b) Principals who receive a report under Subsection (3)(a) shall submit a report of the alleged incident, and actions taken in response, to the district superintendent or the superintendent's designee within 10 working days after receipt of the report.

(c) Failure of a person holding a professional certificate to report as required under this Subsection (3) constitutes an unprofessional practice.

(4) Limitations of liability set forth under Section 53G-8-405 apply to this section.

§ 53G-8-212. Defacing or injuring school property -Student's liability -Voluntary work program alternative.

(1) A student who willfully defaces or otherwise damages any school property may be suspended or otherwise disciplined.

(2)(a) If a school's property has been lost or willfully cut, defaced, or otherwise damaged, the school may withhold the issuance of an official written grade report, diploma, or transcript of the student responsible for the damage or loss until the student or the student's parent has paid for the damages.

(b) The student's parent is liable for damages as otherwise provided in Section 78A-6-1113.

(3)(a) If the student and the student's parent are unable to pay for the damages or if it is determined by the school in consultation with the student's parent that the student's interests would not be served if the parent were to pay for the damages, the school shall provide for a program of work the student may complete in lieu of the payment.

(b) The school shall release the official grades, diploma, and transcripts of the student upon completion of the work.

(4) Before any penalties are assessed under this section, the school shall adopt procedures to ensure that the student's right to due process is protected.

(5) No penalty may be assessed for damages which may be reasonably attributed to normal wear and tear.

(6) If the Department of Human Services or a licensed child-placing agency has been granted custody of the student, the student's records, if requested by the department or agency, may not be withheld from the department or agency for nonpayment of damages under this section.

§ 53G-8-603. Criminal trespass upon school property–Penalty.

(1) A person is guilty of criminal trespass upon school property if the person does the following:

(a) enters or remains unlawfully upon school property, and:

(i) intends to cause annoyance or injury to a person or damage to property on the school property;

(ii) intends to commit a crime; or

(iii) is reckless as to whether the person's presence will cause fear for the safety of another; or

(b) enters or remains without authorization upon school property if notice against entry or remaining has been given by:

(i) personal communication to the person by a school official or an individual with apparent authority to act for a school official;

(ii) the posting of signs reasonably likely to come to the attention of trespassers;

(iii) fencing or other enclosure obviously designed to exclude trespassers; or

(iv) a current order of suspension or expulsion.

(2) As used in this section:

(a) "Enter" means intrusion of the entire body.

(b) "School official" means a public or private school administrator or person in charge of a school program or activity.

(c) "School property" means real property owned or occupied by a public or private school, including real property temporarily occupied for a school activity or program.

(3) Violation of this section is a class B misdemeanor.

§ 53G-8-604. Traffic ordinances on school property–Enforcement.

(1) A local political subdivision in which real property is located that belongs to, or is controlled by, the state board, an LEA governing board, an area vocational center, or the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind may, at the request of the responsible board of education or institutional council, adopt ordinances for the control of vehicular traffic on that property.

(2) A law enforcement officer whose jurisdiction includes the property in question may enforce an ordinance adopted under Subsection (1).

§ 76-5-102.3. Assault against school employees.

(1) Any person who commits an assault as defined in Section 76-5-102 or commits a threat of violence as defined in Section 76-5-107, against an employee of a public or private school, with knowledge that the individual is an employee, and when the employee is acting within the scope of his authority as an employee, is guilty of a class A misdemeanor.

(2) As used in this section, "employee" includes a volunteer.

§ 76-8-1402. Disruption of activities in or near school building–Failure to leave–Reentry–Penalties.

(1) In the absence of a local ordinance or other controlling law governing the conduct described in this Subsection (1), a person is guilty of an offense under Subsection (2) who, while on a street, sidewalk, or public way adjacent to any school building or ground:

(a) by his or her presence or acts, materially disrupts the peaceful conduct of school activities; and

(b) remains upon the place under Subsection (1)(a) after being asked to leave by the chief administrator of that school.

(2)(a) A violation of Subsection (1) is subject to the penalties under Subsection (2)(b) unless the violation constitutes another offense subject to a greater penalty.

(b) (i) The first and second violation of Subsection (1) are class B misdemeanors.

(ii) A third and any subsequent violations of Subsection (1) are class A misdemeanors.

§ 76-9-106. Disrupting the operation of a school.

(1) A person is guilty of disrupting the operation of a school if the person, after being asked to leave by a school official, remains on school property for the purpose of encouraging or creating an unreasonable and substantial disruption or risk of disruption of a class, activity, program, or other function of a public or private school.

(2) For purposes of this section, "school property" includes property being used by a public or private school for a school function.

(3) Disrupting the operation of a school is a class B misdemeanor.

§ 76-9-107. Unauthorized entry of school bus–Posting of warning on school buses.

(1) As used in this section:

(a) "Driver" means the driver of the school bus.

(b) "School bus" means every publicly or privately owned motor vehicle designed for transporting 10 or more passengers and operated for the transportation of children to or from school or school activities.

(2) A person is guilty of a class B misdemeanor if the person:

(a) enters a school bus with the intent to commit a criminal offense;

(b) enters a school bus and disrupts or interferes with the driver; or

(c) enters a school bus and refuses to leave the bus after being ordered to leave by the driver and the person:

(i) is not a peace officer acting within the scope of his or her authority as a peace officer;

(ii) is not authorized by the school district to board the bus as a student or as an individual employed by the school district or volunteering as a participant in a school activity;

(iii) causes or attempts to cause a disruption or an annoyance to any passenger on the bus; or

(iv) is reckless as to whether the person's presence or behavior will cause fear on the part of any passenger on the bus.

(3) Each school district shall ensure that clearly legible signs be placed on each school bus, next to each entrance to the bus, warning that unauthorized entry of a school bus is a violation of state law.

§ 76-10-1235. Accessing pornographic or indecent material on school property.

(1) As used in this section:

(a) "Pornographic or indecent material" means any material:

(i) defined as harmful to minors in Section 76-10-1201;

(ii) described as pornographic in Section 76-10-1203; or

(iii) described in Section 76-10-1227.

(b) "School property" means property, including land and improvements, that a school district or charter school owns, leases, or occupies.

(2) Except as provided in Subsection (3), a person is guilty of accessing pornographic or indecent material on school property when the person willfully or knowingly creates, views, or otherwise gains access to pornographic or indecent material while present on school property, under circumstances not amounting to an attempted or actual violation of:

(a) distributing pornographic material as specified in Section 76-10-1204;

(b) inducing acceptance of pornographic material as specified in Section 76-10-1205;

(c) dealing in material harmful to a minor as specified in Section 76-10-1206; or

(d) indecent public displays as specified in Section 76-10-1228.

(3) This section does not apply to school or law enforcement personnel when the access to pornographic or indecent material on school property is limited to:

(a) investigation of a violation of this section; or

(b) enforcement of this section.

(4) Each separate offense under this section is:

(a) a class A misdemeanor if the person is 18 years of age or older; and

(b) a class B misdemeanor if the person is under 18 years of age.

(5) This section does not prohibit disciplinary action for actions that violate this section.

REGULATIONS

R277-495-1. Authority and Purpose.

(1) This rule is authorized by:

(a) Utah Constitution Article X, Section 3, which vests general control and supervision over public education in the Board;

(b) Subsection 53E-3-401(4), which allows the Board to make rules to execute the Board's duties and responsibilities under the Utah Constitution and state law;

(c) Subsection 53G-8-202(2)(c)(i), which directs the Superintendent to develop a conduct and discipline policy model for elementary and secondary public schools; and

(d) 47 CFR, Part 54, Children's Internet Protection Act, which requires schools and libraries that have computers with internet access to certify they have internet safety policies and technology protection measures in place to receive discounted internet access and services.

(2) The purpose of this rule is to direct all LEAs and public schools to adopt policies, individually or collectively as school districts or consortia of charter schools, governing the possession and use of electronic devices including:

(a) both LEA-owned and privately-owned, while on public school premises or during participation in school activities; and

(b) for LEA-owned devices, wherever the LEA-owned devices are used.

R277-495-2. Definitions.

(1) "Acceptable use policy" means a document stipulating constraints and practices that a user shall accept prior to a user accessing an LEA's, or any school within an LEA's, network or the Internet.

(2) "Electronic device" means a device that is used for audio, video, or text communication or any other type of computer or computer-like instrument including:

(a) a smart phone;

(b) a smart or electronic watch;

(c) a tablet; or

(d) a virtual reality device.

(3) "Guest" means an individual:

(a) who is not a student, employee, or designated volunteer of a public school; and

(b) who is on school property or at the site of a school-sponsored activity or event.

(4) "Inappropriate matter" means pornographic or indecent material as defined in Subsection 76-10-1253(1)(a).

(5) "LEA" includes for purposes of this rule, the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind.

(6) "LEA-owned electronic device" means a device that is used for audio, video, text communication, or other type of computer or computer-like instrument that is identified as being owned, provided, issued or lent by the LEA to a student or employee.

(7) "Policy" means an electronic device use policy as required by this rule that contains:

(a) permissible uses of an electronic device under certain circumstances; or

(b) restricted uses of an electronic devices under certain circumstances.

(8) "Privately-owned electronic device" means a device, including an electronic device that is used for audio, video, text communication, or other type of computer or computer-like instrument that is not owned or issued by the LEA to a student, or employee.

(9) "Public school" means a school or public school program, grades kindergarten through 12, that is part of the Utah public school system, including a school with a distance learning program or alternative program.

(10) "Student," for purposes of this rule, means an individual enrolled as a student at an LEA regardless of the part-time nature of the enrollment or the age of the individual.

(11) (a) "The Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA)" means federal regulations enacted by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and administrated by the Schools and Libraries Division of the FCC.

(b) CIPA and companion laws, the Neighborhood Children's Internet Protection Act (NCIPA) and the Protecting Children in the 21st Century Act, require recipients of federal technology funds to comply with certain Internet filtering and policy requirements.

(12) "Utah Education Telehealth Network or UETN" means the Utah Education and Telehealth Network created in Section 53B-17-105.

R277-495-3. Requirement of Electronic Device Use Policy, Creation, and Access.

(1) An LEA shall require all schools under the LEA's supervision to have a policy or policies for students, employees and, where appropriate, for guests, governing the use of electronic devices on school premises and at school sponsored activities.

(2) An LEA shall review and approve policies regularly.

(3) An LEA shall encourage schools to involve teachers, parents, students, school employees, school community councils, and community members in developing the local policies.

(4) An LEA shall provide copies of the LEA's policies or clear electronic links to policies at LEA offices, in schools and on the LEA's website in the same location as the LEA's data governance plan required in R277-487.

(5) An LEA and all schools within the LEA shall cooperate to ensure that all policies within a school or school district are consistent and accessible to parents and community members.

(6) An LEA shall provide reasonable public notice and at least one public hearing or meeting to address a proposed or revised acceptable use policy.

(7) An LEA shall retain documentation of the policy review and adoption actions.

R277-495-4. LEA Electronic Device Policy Requirements.

(1) An LEA's policy shall include at least the following:

(a) definitions of electronic devices covered by policy;

(b) prohibitions on the use of electronic devices in ways that:

(i) bully, humiliate, harass, or intimidate school-related individuals, including students, employees, and guests, consistent with R277-609 and R277-613; or

(ii) violate local, state, or federal laws;

(c) the prohibition of access by students, LEA employees and guests to inappropriate matter on the internet and world wide web while using LEA equipment, services, or connectivity whether on or off school property;

(e) directives on the safety and security of students when using social media and other forms of electronic communications;

(f) directives on unauthorized access, including hacking and other unlawful activities by a user of an LEA electronic device; and

(g) directives on unauthorized disclosure, use and dissemination of personal student information under R277-487 and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)34 CFR, Part 99.

(2) In addition to the requirements of Subsection (1), an LEA's policies for student use of electronic devices shall include directives regarding the following:

(a) the use of privately-owned electronic devices during standardized assessments;

(b) administrative penalties for misuse of electronic devices during school hours or at a school-sponsored;

(c) violations of an LEA's acceptable use policies that may result in confiscation of LEA-owned electronic devices or restricted access on the LEA's;

(d) a student's personal responsibility for devices assigned or provided to a student by the LEA, both for loss or damage of electronic devices and use of electronic devices consistent with the LEA's directives;

(e) use of electronic devices in violation of an LEA's or teacher's instructional policies may result in the confiscation of privately-owned electronic devices for a designated period; and

(f) uses of privately-owned electronic devices to bully or harass other students or employees during school hours or at school-sponsored activities that may result in the student being subject to LEA disciplinary action.

(3) In addition to the provisions of Subsections (1) and (2), directives for employee use of electronic devices shall include:

(a) notice that use of electronic devices to access inappropriate matter on LEA-owned electronic devices or privately-owned electronic devices on school property, at school-sponsored events or using school connectivity may have criminal, employment or student disciplinary consequences, and if appropriate, may be reported to law enforcement;

(b) notice that an employee is responsible for LEA-issued electronic devices at all times and misuse of an electronic device may have employment consequences, regardless of the user; and

(c) required staff responsibilities in educating minors on appropriate online activities, as required by Section 53G-7-1202, and in supervising such activities.

(4) An LEA's policies shall also include the following:

(a) prohibitions or restrictions on unauthorized use that would cause invasions of reasonable expectations of student and employee privacy;

(b) procedures to report the misuse of electronic devices; and

(c) potential disciplinary actions toward students or employees for violation of local policies regarding the use of electronic devices; and

(d) exceptions to the policy for special circumstances, health-related reasons and emergencies, if any.

(5) An LEA shall certify annually through UETN, and as required by the FCC, that the LEA has a CIPA-compliant acceptable use policy.

R277-495-5. Required School Level Training.

(1) A school shall provide, within the first 45 days of each school year, a school-wide or in-classroom training to employees and students that covers:

(a) the contents of the school's policy;

(b) the importance of digital citizenship;

(c) the LEA's conduct and discipline related consequences as related to a violation of the school's policy;

(d) the LEA's general conduct and discipline policies as described in Section 53G-8-202; and

(e) the benefits of connecting to the Internet and utilizing the school's Internet filters, while on school premises.

(2) A school that adopts a permissible use policy shall:

(a) within the first 45 days of each school-year, provide school-wide or in-classroom training to employees and students that covers:

(i) the elements described in Subsections (1)(a) through (e); and

(ii) specific rules governing the permissible and restricted uses of personal electronic devices while in a classroom; and

(b) require that each educator who allows the use of a personal electronic device in the classroom clearly communicates to parents and students the conditions under which the use of a personal electronic device is allowed.

Major Category
Prevention and Behavioral Interventions (Non-Punitive)
Sub Category
Prevention
Statute

LAWS

§ 53F-5-206. Grant awards for elementary suicide prevention programs.

(1) To foster peer-to-peer suicide prevention, resiliency, and anti-bullying programs in elementary schools, the public education suicide prevention coordinator, described in Section 53G-9-702, shall, subject to legislative appropriations, award grants to elementary schools.

(2) A grant award may not exceed $500 per school per year.

(3) The application for a grant shall contain:

(a) a requested award amount;

(b) a budget; and

(c) a narrative plan of the peer-to-peer suicide prevention, resiliency, or anti-bullying program.

(4) When awarding a grant under this section, the public education suicide prevention coordinator shall consider:

(a) the content of a grant application; and

(b) whether an application is submitted in the manner and form prescribed.

§ 53G-4-402. Powers and duties generally.

(18)(a) A local school board shall adopt and implement a comprehensive emergency response plan to prevent and combat violence in the local school board's public schools, on school grounds, on its school vehicles, and in connection with school-related activities or events.

(b) The plan shall:

(i) include prevention, intervention, and response components;

(ii) be consistent with the student conduct and discipline policies required for school districts under Chapter 11, Part 2, Miscellaneous Requirements;

(iii) require inservice training for all district and school building staff on what their roles are in the emergency response plan;

(iv) provide for coordination with local law enforcement and other public safety representatives in preventing, intervening, and responding to violence in the areas and activities referred to in Subsection (18)(a); and

(v) include procedures to notify a student, to the extent practicable, who is off campus at the time of a school violence emergency because the student is:

(A) participating in a school-related activity; or

(B) excused from school for a period of time during the regular school day to participate in religious instruction at the request of the student's parent.

(c) The state board, through the state superintendent, shall develop comprehensive emergency response plan models that local school boards may use, where appropriate, to comply with Subsection (18)(a).

(d) A local school board shall, by July 1 of each year, certify to the state board that its plan has been practiced at the school level and presented to and reviewed by its teachers, administrators, students, and their parents and local law enforcement and public safety representatives.

§ 53G-9-607. Training, education, and prevention.

(1)(a) An LEA governing board shall include in the training of a school employee training regarding bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, and retaliation that meets the standards described in Subsection (4).

(b) An LEA governing board may offer voluntary training to parents and students regarding abusive conduct.

(2) To the extent that state or federal funding is available for this purpose, LEA governing boards are encouraged to implement programs or initiatives, in addition to the training described in Subsection (1), to provide for training and education regarding, and the prevention of, bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, and retaliation.

(3) The programs or initiatives described in Subsection (2) may involve:

(a) the establishment of a bullying task force; or

(b) the involvement of school employees, students, or law enforcement.

(4) The state board shall make rules that establish standards for high quality training related to bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, and retaliation.

§ 53G-9-702. Youth suicide prevention programs required in secondary schools–State board to develop model programs–Reporting requirements.

(1) As used in the section:

(a) "Intervention" means an effort to prevent a student from attempting suicide.

(b) "Postvention" means mental health intervention after a suicide attempt or death to prevent or contain contagion.

(c) "Program" means a youth suicide prevention program described in Subsection (2).

(d) "Public education suicide prevention coordinator" means an individual designated by the state board as described in Subsection (3).

(e) "Secondary grades":

(i) means grades 7 through 12; and

(ii) if a middle or junior high school includes grade 6, includes grade 6.

(f) "State suicide prevention coordinator" means the state suicide prevention coordinator described in Section 62A-15-1101.

(2) In collaboration with the public education suicide prevention coordinator, a school district or charter school, in the secondary grades of the school district or charter school, shall implement a youth suicide prevention program, which, in collaboration with the training, programs, and initiatives described in Section 53G-9-607, shall include programs and training to address:

(a) bullying and cyberbullying, as those terms are defined in Section 53G-9-601;

(b) prevention of youth suicide;

(c) increased risk of suicide among youth who are not accepted by family for any reason, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning youth;

(d) youth suicide intervention;

(e) postvention for family, students, and faculty;

(f) underage drinking of alcohol;

(g) methods of strengthening the family; and

(h) methods of strengthening a youth's relationships in the school and community.

(3) The state board shall:

(a) designate a public education suicide prevention coordinator; and

(b) in collaboration with the Department of Heath and the state suicide prevention coordinator, develop model programs to provide to school districts and charter schools:

(i) program training; and

(ii) resources regarding the required components described in Subsection (2)(b).

(4) The public education suicide prevention coordinator shall:

(a) oversee the youth suicide prevention programs of school districts and charter schools;

(b) coordinate prevention and postvention programs, services, and efforts with the state suicide prevention coordinator; and

(c) award grants in accordance with Section 53F-5-206.

(5) A public school suicide prevention program may allow school personnel to ask a student questions related to youth suicide prevention, intervention, or postvention.

(6)(a) Subject to legislative appropriation, the state board may distribute money to a school district or charter school to be used to implement evidence-based practices and programs, or emerging best practices and programs, for preventing suicide in the school district or charter school.

(b) The state board shall distribute money under Subsection (6)(a) so that each school that enrolls students in grade 7 or a higher grade receives an allocation of at least $1,000.

(c)(i) A school shall use money allocated to the school under Subsection (6)(b) to implement evidence-based practices and programs, or emerging best practices and programs, for preventing suicide.

(ii) Each school may select the evidence-based practices and programs, or emerging best practices and programs, for preventing suicide that the school implements.

§ 53G-9-703. Parent education- Mental health- Bullying- Safety.

(1)(a) Except as provided in Subsection (3), a school district shall offer a seminar for parents of students in the school district that:

(i) is offered at no cost to parents;

(ii) begins at or after 6 p.m.;

(iii) is held in at least one school located in the school district; and

(iv) covers the topics described in Subsection (2).

(b)(i) A school district shall annually offer one parent seminar for each 11,000 students enrolled in the school district.

(ii) Notwithstanding Subsection (1)(b)(i), a school district may not be required to offer more than three seminars.

(c) A school district may:

(i) develop its own curriculum for the seminar described in Subsection (1)(a); or

(ii) use the curriculum developed by the state board under Subsection (2).

(d) A school district shall notify each charter school located in the attendance boundaries of the school district of the date and time of a parent seminar, so the charter school may inform parents of the seminar.

(2) The state board shall:

(a) develop a curriculum for the parent seminar described in Subsection (1) that includes information on:

(i) substance abuse, including illegal drugs and prescription drugs and prevention;

(ii) bullying;

(iii) mental health, depression, suicide awareness, and suicide prevention, including education on limiting access to fatal means;

(iv) Internet safety, including pornography addiction; and

(v) the SafeUT Crisis Line established in Section 53B-17-1202; and

(b) provide the curriculum, including resources and training, to school districts upon request.

(3)(a) A school district is not required to offer the parent seminar if the local school board determines that the topics described in Subsection (2) are not of significant interest or value to families in the school district.

(b) If a local school board chooses not to offer the parent seminar, the local school board shall notify the state board and provide the reasons why the local school board chose not to offer the parent seminar.

§ 53G-10-405. Instruction on the harmful effects of alcohol, tobacco, and controlled substances–Rulemaking authority–Assistance from the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health.

(1) The state board shall adopt rules providing for instruction at each grade level on the harmful effects of alcohol, tobacco, and controlled substances upon the human body and society. The rules shall require but are not limited to instruction on the following:

(a) teaching of skills needed to evaluate advertisements for, and media portrayal of, alcohol, tobacco, and controlled substances;

(b) directing students towards healthy and productive alternatives to the use of alcohol, tobacco, and controlled substances; and

(c) discouraging the use of alcohol, tobacco, and controlled substances.

(2) At the request of the state board, the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health shall cooperate with the state board in developing programs to provide this instruction.

(3) The state board shall participate in efforts to enhance communication among community organizations and state agencies, and shall cooperate with those entities in efforts which are compatible with the purposes of this section.

§ 53G-10-406. Underage drinking prevention program–State board rules.

(1) As used in this section:

(a) "Advisory council" means the Underage Drinking Prevention Program Advisory Council created in this section.

(b) "Program" means the Underage Drinking Prevention Program created in this section.

(c) "School-based prevention presentation" means an evidence-based program intended for students aged 13 and older that:

(i) is aimed at preventing underage consumption of alcohol;

(ii) is delivered by methods that engage students in storytelling and visualization;

(iii) addresses the behavioral risk factors associated with underage drinking; and

(iv) provides practical tools to address the dangers of underage drinking.

(2) There is created the Underage Drinking Prevention Program that consists of:

(a) a school-based prevention presentation for students in grade 8; and

(b) a school-based prevention presentation for students in grade 10 that increases awareness of the dangers of driving under the influence of alcohol.

(3)(a) Beginning with the 2018-19 school year, an LEA shall offer the program each school year to each student in grade 8 and grade 10.

(b) An LEA shall select from the providers qualified by the state board under Subsection (6) to offer the program.

(4) The state board shall administer the program with input from the advisory council.

(5) There is created the Underage Drinking Prevention Program Advisory Council comprised of the following members:

(a) the executive director of the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control or the executive director's designee;

(b) the executive director of the Department of Health or the executive director's designee;

(c) the director of the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health or the director's designee;

(d) the director of the Division of Child and Family Services or the director's designee;

(e) the director of the Division of Juvenile Justice Services or the director's designee;

(f) the state superintendent or the state superintendent's designee; and

(g) two members of the state board, appointed by the chair of the state board.

(6)(a) In accordance with Title 63G, Chapter 6a, Utah Procurement Code, the state board shall qualify one or more providers to provide the program to an LEA.

(b) In selecting a provider described in Subsection (6)(a), the state board shall consider:

(i) whether the provider's program complies with the requirements described in this section;

(ii) the extent to which the provider's underage drinking prevention program aligns with core standards for Utah public schools; and

(iii) the provider's experience in providing a program that is effective at reducing underage drinking.

(7)(a) The state board shall use money from the Underage Drinking Prevention Program Restricted Account described in Section 53F-9-304 for the program.

(b) The state board may use money from the Underage Drinking Prevention Program Restricted Account to fund up to .5 of a full-time equivalent position to administer the program.

(8) The state board shall make rules that:

(a) beginning with the 2018-19 school year, require an LEA to offer the Underage Drinking Prevention Program each school year to each student in grade 8 and grade 10; and

(b) establish criteria for the state board to use in selecting a provider described in Subsection (6).

REGULATIONS

R277-400-8. Prevention and Intervention.

(1) An LEA shall provide a school comprehensive violence prevention and intervention strategies as part of a school's regular curriculum including:

(a) resource lessons and materials on anger management;

(b) conflict resolution; and

(c) respect for diversity and other cultures.

(2) As part of a violence prevention and intervention strategy in subsection (1), a school may provide age-appropriate instruction on firearm safety including appropriate steps to take if a student sees a firearm or facsimile in school.

(3) An LEA shall also develop student assistance programs including:

(a) care teams;

(b) school intervention programs; and

(c) interagency case management teams.

(4) In developing student assistance programs, an LEA may coordinate with other state agencies and the Superintendent.

R277-436-1. Definitions.

A. "Student at risk" means any student who because of his individual needs requires some kind of uniquely designed intervention in order to achieve literacy, graduate and be prepared for transition from school to post-school options.

B. "Board" means the Utah State Board of Education.

C. "Gang" (as defined in this rule) means a group of three or more people who form an allegiance and engage in a range of anti-social behaviors that may include violent or unlawful activity or both. These groups may have a name, turf, colors, symbols, or distinct dress, or any combination of the preceding characteristics.

D. "Gang prevention" means instructional and support strategies, activities, programs, or curricula designed and implemented to provide successful experiences for youth and families. These components shall promote cultural and social competence, self-management skills, citizenship, preparation for life skills, academic achievement, literacy, and interpersonal relationship skills required for school completion and full participation in society.

E. "Gang intervention" means specially designed services required by an individual student experiencing difficulty in cultural and social competence, self-management skills, citizenship, preparation for life skills, academic achievement, literacy, and interpersonal relationships within or outside of the school which may impact the individual's susceptibility to gang membership or gang-like activities or both.

F. "Gang Prevention and Intervention Program" means specifically designed projects and activities to help at-risk students stay in school and enhance their cultural and social competence, self-management skills, citizenship, preparation for life skills, academic achievement, literacy, and interpersonal relationship skills required for school completion and full participation in society[...]

R277-436-2. Authority and purpose.

A. This rule is authorized by Utah Constitution Article X, Section 3 which vests general control and authority over public education in the Board, by Section 53A-17a-166(1)(b) which appropriates funds to be used for Gang Prevention and Intervention Programs in the schools, and Section 53A-1-401(3) which allows the Board to adopt rules in accordance with its responsibilities.

B. The purpose of this rule is to establish standards and procedures for distributing funding for gang prevention and intervention programs in public schools.

R277-436-3. Application, distribution of funds, and administrative support.

A. Awards shall be made to individual schools and funds allocated to charter schools or to school districts to distribute to designated schools.

B. School districts may submit a single district-wide proposal for one or more schools within the district. The proposal shall:

(1) provide for distribution of funds to individual schools; and

(2) provide explanations of prevention and intervention activities and strategies planned for individual schools.

C. Charter schools may submit independent or joint proposals.

D. School districts or charter schools or charter consortia may utilize up to ten percent of their funding under the rule for the following specific purposes:

(1) administrative oversight;

(2) professional development for licensed and non-licensed employees who work directly in gang prevention/intervention activities; and

(3) professional and technical services.

E. Proposals/applications shall be provided by the USOE.

F. Awards per school shall be based on funds available.

G. Priority shall be given to applications reflecting interagency and intra-agency collaboration.

H. Proposals receiving funding shall be notified by July 1.

I. Schools or joint school applications that were funded and complied with all requirements of law and rule may reapply in subsequent years using an abbreviated proposal form provided by the USOE.

J. The USOE may retain up to five percent of the annual legislative appropriation for the following specific purposes:

(1) an amount not to exceed 2.5 percent for:

(a) site visits; and

(b) professional development, as determined and guided by the USOE.

(2) an amount not to exceed 2.5 percent for:

(a) administrative oversight; and

(b) statewide coordination training.

R277-436-4. Evaluation and reports.

A. School districts and charter schools or consortia shall provide the USOE with a year-end evaluation report by June 30 for the previous fiscal year.

B. The year-end report shall include:

(1) an expenditure report;

(2) a narrative description of all activities funded;

(3) copies of any and all products developed;

(4) effectiveness report detailing evidence of individual and overall program impact on gang and gang-related activities and involvement; and

(5) other information or data as required by the USOE.

C. The USOE may require additional evaluation or audit procedures from the grant recipient to demonstrate use of funds consistent with the law and Board rules.

R277-436-5. Waivers.

The superintendent may grant a written request for a waiver of a requirement or deadline which a district or school finds unduly restrictive.

R277-460-1. Definitions.

A. "Board" means the Utah State Board of Education.

B. "Educational materials" means visual and auditory media, curricula, textbooks, and other disposable or non-disposable items that enhance student understanding of the subject matter.

C. "Evaluation" means a review by a person or group which assesses procedures, results and products specific to a program.

D. "Local Substance Abuse Authority" means the person or group designated by the Legislature as the county authority to receive public funds for substance abuse prevention and treatment.

E. "Prevention education" means proactive educational activities designed to eliminate any illegal use of controlled substances.

F. "Superintendent" means the State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

G. "USOE" means the Utah State Office of Education.

H. "Utah Substance Abuse Prevention Guiding Principles" means criteria established by the Utah Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health to be used in selecting or developing substance abuse prevention materials.

R277-460-2. Authority and purpose.

A. This rule is authorized by Utah Constitution, Article X, Section 3 which vests general control and authority over public education in the Board, by Section 53G-10-405 which directs the Board to adopt rules providing for instruction on the harmful effects of controlled substances and by Section 51-9-405 which provides for funds from the Substance Abuse Prevention Account to be allocated to the USOE for:

(1) substance abuse prevention and education;

(2) substance abuse prevention training for teachers and administrators; and

(3) school district, charter school or consortia programs to supplement, not supplant, existing local prevention efforts in cooperation with local substance abuse authorities.

B. The purpose of this rule is to provide for the distribution of the USOE's share of the Substance Abuse Prevention Account. [...]

R277-609-4. LEA responsibility to develop plans.

(3) A plan described in Subsection (1) shall include:

(t) gang prevention and intervention policies in accordance with Subsection 53E-3-509 (1);

R277-613-6. Training by LEAs specific to participants in public school athletic programs and school clubs.

(1)(a) Prior to any student, employee or volunteer coach participating in a public school sponsored athletic program, both curricular and extracurricular, or extracurricular club or activity, the student, employee or coach shall participate in bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation prevention training.

(b) A training described in Subsection (1)(a) shall be offered to new participants on an annual basis and to all participants at least once every three years.

(2) An LEA shall inform student athletes and extracurricular club members of prohibited activities under this rule and potential consequences for violation of the law and the rule.

(3) An LEA shall maintain training participant lists or signatures, to be provided to the Board upon request.

Sub Category
Behavioral interventions and student support services
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-6-209. Truancy support centers.

(1) A school district may establish one or more truancy support centers for:

(a) truant minors taken into custody under Section 53G-6-208; or

(b) students suspended or expelled from school.

(2) A truancy support center shall provide services to the truant minor and the truant minor's family, including:

(a) assessments of the truant minor's needs and abilities;

(b) support for the parents and truant minor through counseling and community programs; and

(c) tutoring for the truant minor during the time spent at the center.

(3) For the suspended or expelled student, the truancy support center shall provide an educational setting, staffed with certified teachers and aides, to provide the student with ongoing educational programming appropriate to the student's grade level.

(4) In a district with a truancy support center, all students suspended or expelled from school shall be

referred to the center. A parent shall appear with the student at the center within 48 hours of the suspension or expulsion, not including weekends or holidays. The student shall register and attend classes at the truancy support center for the duration of the suspension or expulsion unless the parent demonstrates that alternative arrangements have been made for the education or supervision of the student during the time of suspension or expulsion.

(5) The truancy support center may provide counseling and other support programming for students suspended or expelled from school and their parents or guardian.

§ 53G-8-802. State Safety and Support Program–State board duties.

(1) There is created the State Safety and Support Program.

(2) The state board shall:

(a) develop in conjunction with the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health model student safety and support policies for an LEA, including:

(i) evidence-based procedures for the assessment of and intervention with an individual whose behavior poses a threat to school safety;

(ii) procedures for referrals to law enforcement; and

(iii) procedures for referrals to a community services entity, a family support organization, or a health care provider for evaluation or treatment;

(b) provide training:

(i) in school safety;

(ii) in evidence-based approaches to improve school climate and address and correct bullying behavior;

(iii) in evidence-based approaches in identifying an individual who may pose a threat to the school community;

(iv) in evidence-based approaches in identifying an individual who may be showing signs or symptoms of mental illness;

(v) on permitted disclosures of student data to law enforcement and other support services under the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. Sec. 1232g; and

(vi) on permitted collection of student data under 20 U.S.C. Sec. 1232h and Sections 53E-9-203 and 53E-9-305;

(c) conduct and disseminate evidence-based research on school safety concerns;

(d) disseminate information on effective school safety initiatives;

(e) encourage partnerships between public and private sectors to promote school safety;

(f) provide technical assistance to an LEA in the development and implementation of school safety initiatives;

(g) in conjunction with the Department of Public Safety, develop and make available to an LEA a model critical incident response training program that includes protocols for conducting a threat assessment, and ensuring building security during an incident;

(h) provide space for the public safety liaison described in Section 53-1-106 and the school-based mental health specialist described in Section 62A-15-103;

(i) create a model school climate survey that may be used by an LEA to assess stakeholder perception of a school environment and adopt rules:

(i) requiring an LEA to:

(A) create or adopt and disseminate a school climate survey; and

(B) disseminate the school climate survey;

(ii) recommending the distribution method, survey frequency, and sample size of the survey; and

(iii) specifying the areas of content for the school climate survey; and

(j) collect aggregate data and school climate survey results from each LEA.

(3) Nothing in this section requires an individual to respond to a school climate survey.

§ 53G-9-801. Definitions.

As used in Section 53G-9-802:

(1) "Attainment goal" means earning:

(a) a high school diploma;

(b) a Utah High School Completion Diploma, as defined in state board rule;

(c) an Adult Education Secondary Diploma, as defined in state board rule; or

(d) an employer-recognized, industry-based certificate that is:

(i) likely to result in job placement; and

(ii) included in the state board's approved career and technical education industry certification list.

(2) "Cohort" means a group of students, defined by the year in which the group enters grade 9.

(3) "Designated student" means a student:

(a)(i) who has withdrawn from an LEA before earning a diploma;

(ii) who has been dropped from average daily membership; and

(iii) whose cohort has not yet graduated; or

(b) who is at risk of meeting the criteria described in Subsection (3)(a), as determined by the student's LEA, using risk factors defined in rules made by the state board.

(4) "Graduation rate" means:

(a) for a school district or a charter school that includes grade 12, the graduation rate calculated by the state board for federal accountability and reporting purposes; or

(b) for a charter school that does not include grade 12, a proxy graduation rate defined in rules made by the state board in accordance with Title 63G, Chapter 3, Utah Administrative Rulemaking Act.

(5) "Local education agency" or "LEA" means a school district or charter school that serves students in grade 9, 10, 11, or 12.

(6) "Nontraditional program" means a program, as defined in rules made by the State Board of Education under Subsection 53E-3-501(1)(e), in which a student receives instruction through:

(a) distance learning;

(b) online learning;

(c) blended learning; or

(d) competency-based learning.

(7) "Statewide graduation rate" means:

(a) for a school district or a charter school that includes grade 12, the statewide graduation rate, as annually calculated by the state board; or

(b) for a charter school that does not include grade 12, the average graduation rate for all charter schools that do not include grade 12.

(8) "Third party" means:

(a) a private provider; or

(b) an LEA that does not meet the criteria described in Subsection 53G-9-802(3).

§ 53G-9-802. Dropout prevention and recovery–Flexible enrollment options–Contracting–Reporting.

(1)(a) Subject to Subsection (1)(b), an LEA shall provide dropout prevention and recovery services to a designated student, including:

(i) engaging with or attempting to recover a designated student;

(ii) developing a learning plan, in consultation with a designated student, to identify:

(A) barriers to regular school attendance and achievement;

(B) an attainment goal; and

(C) a means for achieving the attainment goal through enrollment in one or more of the programs described in Subsection (2);

(iii) monitoring a designated student's progress toward reaching the designated student's attainment goal; and

(iv) providing tiered interventions for a designated student who is not making progress toward reaching the student's attainment goal.

(b) An LEA shall provide the dropout prevention and recovery services described in Subsection (1)(a):

(i) throughout the calendar year; and

(ii) except as provided in Subsection (1)(c)(i), for each designated student who becomes a designated student while enrolled in the LEA.

(c)(i) A designated student's school district of residence shall provide dropout recovery services if the designated student:

(A) was enrolled in a charter school that does not include grade 12; and

(B) becomes a designated student in the summer after the student completes academic instruction at the charter school through the maximum grade level the charter school is eligible to serve under the charter school's charter agreement as described in Section 53G-5-303.

(ii) In accordance with Subsection (1)(c)(iii), a charter school that does not include grade 12 shall notify each of the charter school's student's district of residence, as determined under Section 53G-6-302, when the student completes academic instruction at the charter school as described in Subsection (1)(c)(i)(B).

(iii) The notification described in Subsection (1)(c)(ii) shall include the student's name, contact information, and student identification number.

(2)(a) An LEA shall provide flexible enrollment options for a designated student that:

(i) are tailored to the designated student's learning plan developed under Subsection (1)(a)(ii); and

(ii) include two or more of the following:

(A) enrollment in the LEA in a traditional program;

(B) enrollment in the LEA in a nontraditional program;

(C) enrollment in a program offered by a private provider that has entered into a contract with the LEA to provide educational services; or

(D) enrollment in a program offered by another LEA.

(b) A designated student may enroll in:

(i) a program offered by the LEA under Subsection (2)(a), in accordance with this public education code, rules established by the state board, and policies established by the LEA; or

(ii) the Statewide Online Education Program, in accordance with Title 53F, Chapter 4, Part 5, Statewide Online Education Program.

(c) An LEA shall make the LEA's best effort to accommodate a designated student's choice of enrollment under Subsection (2)(b).

(3) Beginning with the 2017-18 school year and except as provided in Subsection (4), an LEA shall enter into a contract with a third party to provide the dropout prevention and recovery services described in Subsection (1)(a) for any school year in which the LEA meets the following criteria:

(a) the LEA's graduation rate is lower than the statewide graduation rate; and

(b)(i) the LEA's graduation rate has not increased by at least 1% on average over the previous three school years; or

(ii) during the previous calendar year, at least 10% of the LEA's designated students have not:

(A) reached the students' attainment goals; or

(B) made a year's worth of progress toward the students' attainment goals.

(4) An LEA that is in the LEA's first three years of operation is not subject to the requirement described in Subsection (3).

(5) An LEA described in Subsection (3) shall ensure that:

(a) a third party with whom the LEA enters into a contract under Subsection (3) has a demonstrated record of effectiveness engaging with and recovering designated students; and

(b) a contract with a third party requires the third party to:

(i) provide the services described in Subsection (1)(a); and

(ii) regularly report progress to the LEA.

(6) An LEA shall annually submit a report to the state board on dropout prevention and recovery services provided under this section, including:

(a) the methods the LEA or third party uses to engage with or attempt to recover designated students under Subsection (1)(a)(i);

(b) the number of designated students who enroll in a program described in Subsection (2) as a result of the efforts described in Subsection (6)(a);

(c) the number of designated students who reach the designated students' attainment goals identified under Subsection (1)(a)(ii)(B); and

(d) funding allocated to provide dropout prevention and recovery services.

(7) The state board shall:

(a) ensure that an LEA described in Subsection (3) contracts with a third party to provide dropout prevention and recovery services in accordance with Subsections (3) and (5); and

(b) report on the provisions of this section in accordance with Section 53E-1-203, including a summary of the reports submitted under Subsection (6).

§ 53G-9-803. Remediation programs for secondary students.

(1) For purposes of this section:

(a) "Secondary school" means a school that provides instruction to students in grades 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, or 12.

(b) "Secondary school student":

(i) means a student enrolled in a secondary school; and

(ii) includes a student in grade 6 if the student attends a secondary school.

(2) A school district or charter school shall implement programs for secondary school students to attain the competency levels and graduation requirements established by the state board.

(3)(a) A school district or charter school shall establish remediation programs for secondary school students who do not meet competency levels in English, mathematics, science, or social studies.

(b) Participation in the programs is mandatory for secondary school students who fail to meet the competency levels based on classroom performance.

(4) Secondary school students who require remediation under this section may not be advanced to the following class in subject sequences until they meet the required competency level for the subject or complete the required remediation program, except that a school district or charter school may allow secondary school students requiring remediation who would otherwise be scheduled to enter their first year of high school to complete their remediation program during that first year.

(5)(a) Remediation programs provided under this section should not be unnecessarily lengthy or repetitive.

(b) A secondary school student need not repeat an entire class if remediation can reasonably be achieved through other means.

(6) A school district or charter school may charge secondary school students a fee to participate in the remediation programs.

REGULATIONS

R277-400-8. Prevention and Intervention.

(1) An LEA shall provide a school comprehensive violence prevention and intervention strategies as part of a school's regular curriculum including:

(a) resource lessons and materials on anger management;

(b) conflict resolution; and

(c) respect for diversity and other cultures.

(2) As part of a violence prevention and intervention strategy in subsection (1), a school may provide age-appropriate instruction on firearm safety including appropriate steps to take if a student sees a firearm or facsimile in school.

(3) An LEA shall also develop student assistance programs including:

(a) care teams;

(b) school intervention programs; and

(c) interagency case management teams.

(4) In developing student assistance programs, an LEA may coordinate with other state agencies and the Superintendent.

R277-606-1. Authority and purpose.

(1) This rule is authorized by:

(a) Utah Constitution Article X, Section 3, which vests general control and supervision over public education in the Board; and

(b) Section 53A-15-1903, which requires the Board to develop rules to set policies related to a dropout prevention and recovery program;

(c) Section 53A-1-401, which allows the Board to make rules to execute the Board's duties and responsibilities under the Utah Constitution and state law.

(2) The purpose of this rule is to:

(a) develop policies related to an LEA's dropout prevention and recovery program; and

(b) set reporting requirements for LEAs with a dropout prevention and recovery program.

R277-606-2. Definitions.

For purposes of this rule:

(1) "Attainment goal" has the same meaning as that term is defined in Section 53A-15-1902.

(2) "Average daily membership" means the same as that term is defined in Section 53A-17a-103.

(3) "Cohort" means the same as that term is defined in Section 53A-15-1902.

(4) "College and career readiness work" means the same as that term is defined in Section 53A-15-1902.

(5) "Designated student" means a student:

(a)(i) who has withdrawn from a secondary school prior to earning a diploma;

(ii) who was dropped from average daily membership; and

(iii) whose cohort has not yet graduated; or

(b) who is at risk of meeting the criteria described in Subsection (5)(a), as determined by the student's LEA, using the risk factors described in Subsection (10).

(6) "Graduation rate" means the same as that term is defined in Section 53A-15-1902.

(7) "LEA" means the same as that term is defined in Section 53A-15-1902.

(8) "Nontraditional program" means the same as that term is defined in Section 53A-15-1902.

(9) "Proxy graduation rate" means a rate calculated:

(a) in a manner similar to the regular graduation rate for each year of grades 9 through 12;

(b) treating a student as having graduated if the student returned after each grade year; and

(c) treating a student as dropping out if the student:

(i) did not return after each year; or

(ii) the student did not have an acceptable exit code entered into the Board's UTREx system.

(10) "Risk factors" means:

(a) low academic performance, as measured by grades, test scores, or course failure;

(b) poor behavior, as measured by office disciplinary referrals, suspensions, or expulsions; and

(c) absenteeism, whether excused or unexcused absences, and including days tardy and truant.

(11) "Third party" means the same as that term is defined in Section 53A-15-1902.

R277-606-3. LEA dropout prevention and recovery programs.

(1) Beginning with the 2016-17 school year, an LEA that serves students in grades 9, 10, 11, or 12 shall provide a dropout prevention and recovery program for a designated student with the dropout prevention and recovery services described in Section 53A-15-1903.

(2) An LEA that enrolls a designated student in a dropout prevention and recovery program shall:

(a) develop a written policy that describes:

(i) how the LEA or the LEA's third party will measure and report if the designated student made a year's worth of progress toward an attainment goal as required in Section R277-606-4; and

(ii) how membership days will be determined for the designated student in accordance with the LEA's established school schedule and enrollment policies; and

(b) indicate that the designated student is enrolling in the LEA's dropout prevention and recovery program in accordance with current UTREx specifications.

(3)(a) If a designated student chooses to enroll in a dropout prevention and recovery program, the LEA, in consultation with the designated student, shall prepare, in accordance with the LEA's written policy described in Subsection (2), a learning plan for the designated student that includes an attainment goal for the designated student

(b) If an LEA is required to contract with a third party to provide dropout prevention and recovery services, the third party shall:

(i) work with the LEA to prepare a learning plan for a designated student described in Subsection (3)(a);

(ii) regularly report a designated student's progress toward the designated student's attainment goal in accordance with the LEA's written policy described in Subsection (2); an

(iii) maintain documentation required by the LEA for the LEA to meet the requirements of Subsection R277-606-4(4).

(4)(a) If a designated student is a student with a disability and an LEA provides dropout prevention and recovery services without using a third party, the LEA shall:

(i) prepare an IEP or Section 504 plan for the designated student; and

(ii) provide the dropout prevention and recovery services in accordance with the designated student's IEP or Section 504 plan.

(b) If a designated student is a student with a disability and an LEA contracts with a third party to provide dropout prevention and recovery services to the designated student:

(i) the LEA shall prepare an IEP or Section 504 plan for the designated student; and

(ii) the third party shall provide the dropout prevention and recovery services to the designated student in accordance with the designated student's IEP or Section 504 plan.

R277-606-4. Reporting requirements and audits.

(1)(a) Beginning with the 2016-17 school year, on or before August 1, 2017 and on or before August 1 each year thereafter, an LEA shall submit a report to the Superintendent on the LEA's dropout prevention and recovery services.

(b) The report described in Subsection (1)(a) shall include:

(i) the information described in Section 53A-15-1903;

(ii) the total number of designated students in the LEA; and

(iii) if applicable, the name of a third party the LEA is contracting with to provide dropout prevention and recovery services.

(2) A third party working with an LEA on the LEA's dropout prevention and recovery program shall report any information requested by the LEA including any information required for the LEA to submit a report described in Subsection (1).

(3) The Superintendent shall:

(a) review LEA reports described in Subsection (1);

(b) by April 1 each year, inform an LEA that the LEA is required to enter into a contract with a third party as described in Subsection 53A-15-1903(3); and

(c) ensure that an LEA described in Subsection 53A-15-1903(3) and Subsection R277-606-3(3) contracts with a third party as required in Section 53A-15-1903 and Section R277-606-3.

(4)(a) An LEA shall maintain documentation to comply with the requirements of Section 53A-15-1903 and this rule.

(b) The Board or the Superintendent may request an audit of an LEA's dropout prevention and recovery program.

R277-609-3. Incorporation of least restricted behavioral interventions (LRBI) technical assistance manual by reference.

(1) This rule incorporates by reference the LRBI Technical Assistance Manual, dated September 2015, provides guidance and information in creating successful behavioral systems and supports within Utah's public schools that:

(a) promote positive behaviors while preventing negative or risky behaviors; and

(b) create a safe learning environment that enhances all student outcomes.

(2) A copy of the manual is located at:

(b) the Utah State Board of Education.

R277-609-4. LEA responsibility to develop plans.

(3) A plan described in Subsection (1) shall include:

(t) gang prevention and intervention policies in accordance with Subsection 53E-3-509 (1); and

R277-609-6. Implementation.

(1) An LEA shall implement strategies and policies consistent with the LEA's plan required in Section R277-609-4.

(2) An LEA shall develop, use and monitor a continuum of intervention strategies to assist students, including students whose behavior in school falls repeatedly short of reasonable expectations, by teaching student behavior expectations, reinforcing student behavior expectations, re-teaching behavior expectations, followed by effective, evidence-based interventions matched to student needs prior to administrative referral.

(3) An LEA shall implement positive behavior interventions and supports as part of the LEA's continuum of behavior interventions strategies.

(4)(a) An LEA shall provide a formal written assessment of a habitually disruptive student as part of a student's suspension or expulsion process that results in court involvement, once an LEA receives information from the court that disruptive student behavior will result in court action.

(b) An LEA shall use assessment information to connect parents and students with supportive school and community resources.

Sub Category
Professional development
Statute

LAWS

§ 53E-3-509. Gang prevention and intervention policies.

(2) The rules described in Subsection (1) may include the following provisions:

(a) school faculty and personnel shall report suspected gang activities relating to the school and its students to a school administrator and law enforcement;

(b) a student who participates in gang activities may be excluded from participation in extracurricular activities, including interscholastic athletics, as determined by the school administration after consultation with law enforcement;

(c) gang-related graffiti or damage to school property shall result in parent notification and appropriate administrative and law enforcement actions, which may include obtaining restitution from those responsible for the damage;

(d) if a serious gang-related incident, as determined by the school administrator in consultation with local law enforcement, occurs on school property, at school related activities, or on a site that is normally considered to be under school control, notification shall be provided to parents of students in the school:

(i) informing them, in general terms, about the incident, but removing all personally identifiable information about students from the notice;

(ii) emphasizing the school's concern for safety; and

(iii) outlining the action taken at the school regarding the incident;

(e) school faculty and personnel shall be trained by experienced evidence based trainers that may include community gang specialists and law enforcement as part of comprehensive strategies to recognize early warning signs for youth in trouble and help students resist serious involvement in undesirable activity, including joining gangs or mimicking gang behavior;

§ 53G-8-802. State Safety and Support Program–State board duties.

(1) There is created the State Safety and Support Program.

(2) The state board shall:

(a) develop in conjunction with the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health model student safety and support policies for an LEA, including:

(i) evidence-based procedures for the assessment of and intervention with an individual whose behavior poses a threat to school safety;

(ii) procedures for referrals to law enforcement; and

(iii) procedures for referrals to a community services entity, a family support organization, or a health care provider for evaluation or treatment;

(b) provide training:

(i) in school safety;

(ii) in evidence-based approaches to improve school climate and address and correct bullying behavior;

(iii) in evidence-based approaches in identifying an individual who may pose a threat to the school community;

(iv) in evidence-based approaches in identifying an individual who may be showing signs or symptoms of mental illness;

(v) on permitted disclosures of student data to law enforcement and other support services under the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. Sec. 1232g; and

(vi) on permitted collection of student data under 20 U.S.C. Sec. 1232h and Sections 53E-9-203 and 53E-9-305;

(c) conduct and disseminate evidence-based research on school safety concerns;

(d) disseminate information on effective school safety initiatives;

(e) encourage partnerships between public and private sectors to promote school safety;

(f) provide technical assistance to an LEA in the development and implementation of school safety initiatives;

(g) in conjunction with the Department of Public Safety, develop and make available to an LEA a model critical incident response training program that includes protocols for conducting a threat assessment, and ensuring building security during an incident;

(h) provide space for the public safety liaison described in Section 53-1-106 and the school-based mental health specialist described in Section 62A-15-103;

(i) create a model school climate survey that may be used by an LEA to assess stakeholder perception of a school environment and adopt rules:

(i) requiring an LEA to:

(A) create or adopt and disseminate a school climate survey; and

(B) disseminate the school climate survey;

(ii) recommending the distribution method, survey frequency, and sample size of the survey; and

(iii) specifying the areas of content for the school climate survey; and

(j) collect aggregate data and school climate survey results from each LEA.

(3) Nothing in this section requires an individual to respond to a school climate survey.

§ 53G-9-607. Training, education, and prevention.

(1)(a) An LEA governing board shall include in the training of a school employee training regarding bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, and retaliation that meets the standards described in Subsection (4).

(b) An LEA governing board may offer voluntary training to parents and students regarding abusive conduct.

(2) To the extent that state or federal funding is available for this purpose, LEA governing boards are encouraged to implement programs or initiatives, in addition to the training described in Subsection (1), to provide for training and education regarding, and the prevention of, bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, and retaliation.

(3) The programs or initiatives described in Subsection (2) may involve:

(a) the establishment of a bullying task force; or

(b) the involvement of school employees, students, or law enforcement.

(4) The state board shall make rules that establish standards for high quality training related to bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, and retaliation.

§ 53G-9-704. Youth suicide prevention training for employees.

(1) A school district or charter school shall require a licensed employee to complete two hours of professional development training on youth suicide prevention within the employee's license cycle described in Section 53E-6-201.

(2) The state board shall:

(a) develop or adopt sample materials to be used by a school district or charter school for professional development training on youth suicide prevention; and

(b) incorporate in rule the training described in Subsection (1) into professional development training described in Section 53E-6-201.

REGULATIONS

R277-495-5. Required School Level Training.

(1) A school shall provide, within the first 45 days of each school year, a school-wide or in-classroom training to employees and students that covers:

(a) the contents of the school's policy;

(b) the importance of digital citizenship;

(c) the LEA's conduct and discipline related consequences as related to a violation of the school's policy;

(d) the LEA's general conduct and discipline policies as described in Section 53G-8-202; and

(e) the benefits of connecting to the Internet and utilizing the school's Internet filters, while on school premises.

(2) A school that adopts a permissible use policy shall:

(a) within the first 45 days of each school-year, provide school-wide or in-classroom training to employees and students that covers:

(i) the elements described in Subsections (1)(a) through (e); and

(ii) specific rules governing the permissible and restricted uses of personal electronic devices while in a classroom; and

(b) require that each educator who allows the use of a personal electronic device in the classroom clearly communicates to parents and students the conditions under which the use of a personal electronic device is allowed.

R277-609-4. LEA responsibility to develop plans.

(2) An LEA shall include administration, instruction and support staff, students, parents, community council, and other community members in policy development, training, and prevention implementation so as to create a community sense of participation, ownership, support, and responsibility.

(3) A plan described in Subsection (1) shall include:

(g) an ongoing staff development program related to development of:

(i) student behavior expectations;

(ii) effective instructional practices for teaching and reinforcing behavior expectations;

(iii) effective intervention strategies; and

(iv) effective strategies for evaluation of the efficiency and effectiveness of interventions;

(h) procedures for ongoing training of appropriate school personnel in:

(i) crisis intervention training;

(ii) emergency safety intervention professional development; and

(iii) LEA policies related to emergency safety interventions consistent with evidence-based practice;

R277-613-4. LEA responsibility to createor updatebullying policies.

(5)(a) An LEA shall provide that students, school employees, coaches, and volunteers receive training on bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation, from individuals qualified to provide such training.

(b) The training described in Subsection (5)(a) shall:

(i) include information on various types of aggression and bullying, including:

(A) overt aggression that may include physical fighting such as punching, shoving, kicking, and verbal threatening behavior, such as name calling, or both physical and verbal aggression or threatening behavior;

(B) relational aggression or indirect, covert, or social aggression, including rumor spreading, intimidation, enlisting a friend to assault a child, and social isolation;

(C) sexual aggression or acts of a sexual nature or with sexual overtones;

(D) cyber-bullying, including use of email, web pages, text messaging, instant messaging, social media, three-way calling or messaging or any other electronic means for aggression inside or outside of school; and

(E) civil rights violations, including bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation based upon the students' or employees' actual or perceived identities and conformance or failure to conform with stereotypes;

(ii) complement the suicide prevention program required for students under Rule R277-620 and the suicide prevention training required for licensed educators consistent with Subsection 53G-9-704(1); and

(iii) include information on when issues relating to this rule may lead to student or employee discipline.

(6) The training described in Subsection (5) shall be offered to:

(a) new school employees, coaches, and volunteers; and

(b) all school employees, coaches, and volunteers at least once every three years.

R277-613-6. Training by LEAs specific to participants in public school athletic programs and school clubs.

(1)(a) Prior to any student, employee or volunteer coach participating in a public school sponsored athletic program, both curricular and extracurricular, or extracurricular club or activity, the student, employee or coach shall participate in bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation prevention training.

(b) A training described in Subsection (1)(a) shall be offered to new participants on an annual basis and to all participants at least once every three years.

(2) An LEA shall inform student athletes and extracurricular club members of prohibited activities under this rule and potential consequences for violation of the law and the rule.

(3) An LEA shall maintain training participant lists or signatures, to be provided to the Board upon request.

Major Category
Monitoring and Accountability
Sub Category
Formal incident reporting of conduct violations
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-6-202. Compulsory education.

(1) For purposes of this section:

(a) “Intentionally” is as defined in Section 76-2-103.

(b) “Recklessly” is as defined in Section 76-2-103.

(c) “Remainder of the school year” means the portion of the school year beginning on the day after the day on which the notice of compulsory education violation described in Subsection (3) is served and ending on the last day of the school year.

(d) “School-age child” means a school-age minor under the age of 14.

(2) Except as provided in Section 53G-6-204 or 53G-6-702, the parent of a school-age minor shall enroll and send the school-age minor to a public or regularly established private school.

(3) A school administrator, a designee of a school administrator, a law enforcement officer acting as a school resource officer, or a truancy specialist may issue a notice of compulsory education violation to a parent of a school-age child if the school-age child is absent without a valid excuse at least five times during the school year.

(4) The notice of compulsory education violation, described in Subsection (3):

(a) shall direct the parent of the school-age child to:

(i) meet with school authorities to discuss the school-age child's school attendance problems; and

(ii) cooperate with the local school board, charter school governing board, or school district in securing regular attendance by the school-age child;

(b) shall designate the school authorities with whom the parent is required to meet;

(c) shall state that it is a class B misdemeanor for the parent of the school-age child to intentionally or recklessly:

(i) fail to meet with the designated school authorities to discuss the school-age child's school attendance problems; or

(ii) fail to prevent the school-age child from being absent without a valid excuse five or more times during the remainder of the school year;

(d) shall be served on the school-age child's parent by personal service or certified mail; and

(e) may not be issued unless the school-age child has been truant at least five times during the school year.

(5) It is a class B misdemeanor for a parent of a school-age minor to intentionally or recklessly fail to enroll the school-age minor in school, unless the school-age minor is exempt from enrollment under Section 53G-6-204 or 53G-6-702.

(6) It is a class B misdemeanor for a parent of a school-age child to, after being served with a notice of compulsory education violation in accordance with Subsections (3) and (4), intentionally or recklessly:

(a) fail to meet with the school authorities designated in the notice of compulsory education violation to discuss the school-age child's school attendance problems; or

(b) fail to prevent the school-age child from being absent without a valid excuse five or more times during the remainder of the school year.

(7) A local school board, charter school governing board, or school district shall report violations of this section to the appropriate county or district attorney.

(8) If school personnel have reason to believe that, after a notice of compulsory education violation is issued, the parent has failed to make a good faith effort to ensure that the child receives an appropriate education, the issuer of the compulsory education violation shall report to the Division of Child and Family Services:

(a) identifying information of the child and the child's parent who received the notice of compulsory education violation;

(b) information regarding the longest number of consecutive school days the school-age minor has been absent from school and the percentage of school days the child has been absent during each relevant school term;

(c) whether the child has made adequate educational progress;

(d) whether the requirements of Section 53G-6-206 have been met;

(e) whether the child is two or more years behind the local public school's age group expectations in one or more basic skills; and

(f) whether the child is receiving special education services or systematic remediation efforts.

§ 53G-8-209. Extracurricular activities -Prohibited conduct -Reporting of violations -Limitation of liability.

(1) The Legislature recognizes that:

(a) participation in student government and extracurricular activities may confer important educational and lifetime benefits upon students, and encourages school districts and charter schools to provide a variety of opportunities for all students to participate in such activities in meaningful ways;

(b) there is no constitutional right to participate in these types of activities, and does not through this section or any other provision of law create such a right;

(c) students who participate in student government and extracurricular activities, particularly competitive athletics, and the adult coaches, advisors, and assistants who direct those activities, become role models for others in the school and community;

(d) these individuals often play major roles in establishing standards of acceptable behavior in the school and community, and establishing and maintaining the reputation of the school and the level of community confidence and support afforded the school; and

(e) it is of the utmost importance that those involved in student government, whether as officers or advisors, and those involved in competitive athletics and related activities, whether students or staff, comply with all applicable laws and standards of behavior and conduct themselves at all times in a manner befitting their positions and responsibilities.

(2)(a) The state board may, and local school boards and charter school governing boards shall, adopt rules or policies implementing this section that apply to both students and staff.

(b) The rules or policies described in Subsection (2)(a) shall include prohibitions against the following types of conduct in accordance with Section 53G-8-211, while in the classroom, on school property, during school sponsored activities, or regardless of the location or circumstance, affecting a person or property described in Subsections 53G-8-203(1)(e)(i) through (iv):

(i) use of foul, abusive, or profane language while engaged in school related activities;

(ii) illicit use, possession, or distribution of controlled substances or drug paraphernalia, and the use, possession, or distribution of an electronic cigarette as defined in Section 76-10-101, tobacco, or alcoholic beverages contrary to law; and

(iii) hazing, demeaning, or assaultive behavior, whether consensual or not, including behavior involving physical violence, restraint, improper touching, or inappropriate exposure of body parts not normally exposed in public settings, forced ingestion of any substance, or any act which would constitute a crime against a person or public order under Utah law.

(3)(a) School employees who reasonably believe that a violation of this section may have occurred shall immediately report that belief to the school principal, district superintendent, or chief administrative officer of a charter school.

(b) Principals who receive a report under Subsection (3)(a) shall submit a report of the alleged incident, and actions taken in response, to the district superintendent or the superintendent's designee within 10 working days after receipt of the report.

(c) Failure of a person holding a professional certificate to report as required under this Subsection (3) constitutes an unprofessional practice.

(4) Limitations of liability set forth under Section 53G-8-405 apply to this section.

§ 53G-8-501. Definitions.

For purposes of Sections 53G-8-502 through 53G-8-504:

(1) "Educator" means a person employed by a public school, but excludes those employed by institutions of higher education.

(2) "Prohibited act" means an act prohibited by Section 53G-4-402, relating to alcohol; Section 58-37-8, relating to controlled substances; or Section 58-37a-5, relating to drug paraphernalia.

§ 53G-8-502. Mandatory reporting of prohibited acts.

If an educator has reasonable cause to believe that a student at the public school where the educator is employed has committed a prohibited act, he shall immediately report that to the school's designated educator.

§ 53G-8-503. Reporting procedure.

(1) The principal of a public school affected by this chapter shall appoint one educator as the "designated educator" to make all reports required under Sections 53G-8-501 through 53G-8-504.

(2) The designated educator, upon receiving a report of a prohibited act from an educator under Section 53G-8-502, shall immediately report the violation to the student's parent, and may report the violation to an appropriate law enforcement agency or official, in accordance with Section 53G-8-211.

(3) The designated educator may not disclose to the student or to the student's parent the identity of the educator who made the initial report.

§ 53G-8-506. Reporting of prohibited acts affecting a school -Confidentiality.

(1) A person who has reasonable cause to believe that an individual has committed a prohibited act shall, in accordance with Section 53G-8-211, immediately notify:

(a) the principal;

(b) an administrator of the affected school;

(c) the superintendent of the affected school district; or

(d) an administrator of the affected school district.

(2) If notice is given to a school official, the official may authorize an investigation into allegations involving school property, students, or school district employees.

(3) A school official may only refer a complaint of an alleged prohibited act reported as occurring on school grounds or in connection with school-sponsored activities to an appropriate law enforcement agency in accordance with Section 53G-8-211.

(4) The identity of persons making reports pursuant to this section shall be kept confidential.

§ 53B-17-1202. SafeUT Crisis Line established.

The University Neuropsychiatric Institute shall:

(1) establish a SafeUT Crisis Line to provide:

(a) a means for an individual to anonymously report:

(i) unsafe, violent, or criminal activities, or the threat of such activities at or near a public school;

(ii) incidents of bullying, cyber-bullying, harassment, or hazing; and

(iii) incidents of physical or sexual abuse committed by a school employee or school volunteer; and

(b) crisis intervention, including suicide prevention, to individuals experiencing emotional distress or psychiatric crisis;

(2) provide the services described in Subsection (1) 24 hours a day, seven days a week; and

(3) when necessary, or as required by law, promptly forward a report received under Subsection (1)(a) to appropriate:

(a) school officials; and

(b) law enforcement officials.

REGULATIONS

R277-608-3. Reporting requirements.

A. Each LEA shall incorporate in the LEA plan submitted to the USOE annually, the prohibition of corporal punishment consistent with the law.

B. An LEA policy shall incorporate a prohibition of corporal punishment consistent with the law, appropriate sanctions and appeal procedures for LEA employees disciplined under this rule and the corresponding state statute.

Sub Category
Parental notification
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-6-202. Compulsory education.

(1) For purposes of this section:

(a) “Intentionally” is as defined in Section 76-2-103.

(b) “Recklessly” is as defined in Section 76-2-103.

(c) “Remainder of the school year” means the portion of the school year beginning on the day after the day on which the notice of compulsory education violation described in Subsection (3) is served and ending on the last day of the school year.

(d) “School-age child” means a school-age minor under the age of 14.

(2) Except as provided in Section 53G-6-204 or 53G-6-702, the parent of a school-age minor shall enroll and send the school-age minor to a public or regularly established private school.

(3) A school administrator, a designee of a school administrator, a law enforcement officer acting as a school resource officer, or a truancy specialist may issue a notice of compulsory education violation to a parent of a school-age child if the school-age child is absent without a valid excuse at least five times during the school year.

(4) The notice of compulsory education violation, described in Subsection (3):

(a) shall direct the parent of the school-age child to:

(i) meet with school authorities to discuss the school-age child's school attendance problems; and

(ii) cooperate with the local school board, charter school governing board, or school district in securing regular attendance by the school-age child;

(b) shall designate the school authorities with whom the parent is required to meet;

(c) shall state that it is a class B misdemeanor for the parent of the school-age child to intentionally or recklessly:

(i) fail to meet with the designated school authorities to discuss the school-age child's school attendance problems; or

(ii) fail to prevent the school-age child from being absent without a valid excuse five or more times during the remainder of the school year;

(d) shall be served on the school-age child's parent by personal service or certified mail; and

(e) may not be issued unless the school-age child has been truant at least five times during the school year.

(5) It is a class B misdemeanor for a parent of a school-age minor to intentionally or recklessly fail to enroll the school-age minor in school, unless the school-age minor is exempt from enrollment under Section 53G-6-204 or 53G-6-702.

(6) It is a class B misdemeanor for a parent of a school-age child to, after being served with a notice of compulsory education violation in accordance with Subsections (3) and (4), intentionally or recklessly:

(a) fail to meet with the school authorities designated in the notice of compulsory education violation to discuss the school-age child's school attendance problems; or

(b) fail to prevent the school-age child from being absent without a valid excuse five or more times during the remainder of the school year.

(7) A local school board, charter school governing board, or school district shall report violations of this section to the appropriate county or district attorney.

(8) If school personnel have reason to believe that, after a notice of compulsory education violation is issued, the parent has failed to make a good faith effort to ensure that the child receives an appropriate education, the issuer of the compulsory education violation shall report to the Division of Child and Family Services:

(a) identifying information of the child and the child's parent who received the notice of compulsory education violation;

(b) information regarding the longest number of consecutive school days the school-age minor has been absent from school and the percentage of school days the child has been absent during each relevant school term;

(c) whether the child has made adequate educational progress;

(d) whether the requirements of Section 53G-6-206 have been met;

(e) whether the child is two or more years behind the local public school's age group expectations in one or more basic skills; and

(f) whether the child is receiving special education services or systematic remediation efforts.

§ 53G-6-203. Truancy -Notice of truancy -Failure to cooperate with school authorities -Habitual truant citation.

(1) Except as provided in Section 53G-6-204 or 53G-6-702, a school-age minor who is enrolled in a public school shall attend the public school in which the school-age minor is enrolled.

(2) A local school board, charter school governing board, or school district may impose administrative penalties on a school-age minor in accordance with Section 53G-8-211 who is truant.

(3) A local school board or charter school governing board:

(a) may authorize a school administrator, a designee of a school administrator, a law enforcement officer acting as a school resource officer, or a truancy specialist to issue notices of truancy to school-age minors who are at least 12 years old; and

(b) shall establish a procedure for a school-age minor, or the school-age minor's parents, to contest a notice of truancy.

(4) The notice of truancy described in Subsection (3):

(a) may not be issued until the school-age minor has been truant at least five times during the school year;

(b) may not be issued to a school-age minor who is less than 12 years old;

(c) may not be issued to a minor exempt from school attendance as provided in Section 53G-6-204 or 53G-6-702;

(d) shall direct the school-age minor and the parent of the school-age minor to:

(i) meet with school authorities to discuss the school-age minor's truancies; and

(ii) cooperate with the local school board, charter school governing board, or school district in securing regular attendance by the school-age minor; and

(e) shall be mailed to, or served on, the school-age minor's parent.

§ 53G-6-208. Taking custody of a person believed to be a truant minor -Disposition -Receiving centers -Reports -Immunity from liability.

(1) A peace officer or public school administrator may take a minor into temporary custody if there is reason to believe the minor is a truant minor.

(2) An individual taking a school-age minor into custody under Subsection (1) shall, without unnecessary delay, release the minor to:

(a) the principal of the minor's school;

(b) a person who has been designated by the local school board or charter school governing board to receive and return the minor to school; or

(c) a receiving center established under Subsection (5).

(3) If the minor refuses to return to school or go to the receiving center, the officer or administrator shall, without unnecessary delay, notify the minor's parents and release the minor to their custody.

(4) If the parents cannot be reached or are unable or unwilling to accept custody, the minor shall be referred to the Division of Child and Family Services.

(5) (a) A local school board or charter school governing board, singly or jointly with another school board, may establish or designate receiving centers within existing school buildings and staff the centers with existing teachers or staff to provide educational guidance and counseling for truant minors. Upon receipt of a truant minor, the center shall, without unnecessary delay, notify and direct the minor's parents to come to the center, pick up the minor, and return the minor to the school in which the minor is enrolled.

(b) If the parents cannot be reached or are unable or unwilling to comply with the request within a reasonable time, the center shall take such steps as are reasonably necessary to insure the safety and well being of the minor, including, when appropriate, returning the minor to school or referring the minor to the Division of Child and Family Services. A minor taken into custody under this section may not be placed in a detention center or other secure confinement facility.

(6) Action taken under this section shall be reported to the appropriate school district. The district shall promptly notify the minor's parents of the action taken [...]

§ 53G-8-204. Suspension and expulsion procedures -Notice to parents -Distribution of policies.

(1)(a) Policies required under this part shall include written procedures for the suspension and expulsion of, or denial of admission to, a student, consistent with due process and other provisions of law.

(b)(i) The policies required in Subsection (1)(a) shall include a procedure directing public schools to notify the custodial parent and, if requested in writing by a noncustodial parent, the noncustodial parent of the suspension and expulsion of, or denial of admission to, a student.

(ii) Subsection (1)(b)(i) does not apply to that portion of school records which would disclose any information protected under a court order.

(iii) The custodial parent is responsible for providing to the school a certified copy of the court order under Subsection (1)(b)(ii) through a procedure adopted by the local school board or the charter school governing board.

(2)(a) Each local school board or charter school governing board shall provide for the distribution of a copy of a school's discipline and conduct policy to each student upon enrollment in the school.

(b) A copy of the policy shall be posted in a prominent location in each school.

(c) Any significant change in a school's conduct and discipline policy shall be distributed to students in the school and posted in the school in a prominent location.

§ 53G-8-210. Disruptive student behavior.

(1) As used in this section:

(a) "Disruptive student behavior" includes:

(i) the grounds for suspension or expulsion described in Section 53G-8-205; and

(ii) the conduct described in Subsection 53G-8-209(2)(b).

(b) "Parent" includes:

(i) a custodial parent of a school-age minor;

(ii) a legally appointed guardian of a school-age minor; or

(iii) any other person purporting to exercise any authority over the minor which could be exercised by a person described in Subsection (1)(b)(i) or (ii).

(c) "Qualifying minor" means a school-age minor who:

(i) is at least nine years old; or

(ii) turns nine years old at any time during the school year.

(d) "School year" means the period of time designated by a local school board or charter school governing board as the school year for the school where the school-age minor is enrolled.

(2) A local school board, school district, charter school governing board, or charter school may impose administrative penalties in accordance with Section 53G-8-211 on a school-age minor who violates this part.

(3)(a) A local school board or charter school governing board shall:

(i) authorize a school administrator or a designee of a school administrator to issue notices of disruptive student behavior to qualifying minors; and

(ii) establish a procedure for a qualifying minor, or a qualifying minor's parent, to contest a notice of disruptive student behavior.

(b) A school representative shall provide to a parent of a school-age minor, a list of resources available to assist the parent in resolving the school-age minor's disruptive student behavior problem.

(c) A local school board or charter school governing board shall establish procedures for a school counselor or other designated school representative to work with a qualifying minor who engages in disruptive student behavior in order to attempt to resolve the minor's disruptive student behavior problems.

(4) The notice of disruptive student behavior described in Subsection (3)(a):

(a) shall be issued to a qualifying minor who:

(i) engages in disruptive student behavior, that does not result in suspension or expulsion, three times during the school year; or

(ii) engages in disruptive student behavior, that results in suspension or expulsion, once during the school year;

(b) shall require that the qualifying minor and a parent of the qualifying minor:

(i) meet with school authorities to discuss the qualifying minor's disruptive student behavior; and

(ii) cooperate with the local school board or charter school governing board in correcting the school-age minor's disruptive student behavior; and

(c) shall be mailed by certified mail to, or served on, a parent of the qualifying minor.

(5) A habitual disruptive student behavior notice:

(a) may only be issued to a qualifying minor who:

(i) engages in disruptive student behavior, that does not result in suspension or expulsion, at least six times during the school year;

(ii)(A) engages in disruptive student behavior, that does not result in suspension or expulsion, at least three times during the school year; and

(B) engages in disruptive student behavior, that results in suspension or expulsion, at least once during the school year; or

(iii) engages in disruptive student behavior, that results in suspension or expulsion, at least twice during the school year; and

(b) may only be issued by a school administrator, a designee of a school administrator, or a truancy specialist, who is authorized by a local school board or charter school governing board to issue a habitual disruptive student behavior notice.

(6)(a) A qualifying minor to whom a habitual disruptive student behavior notice is issued under Subsection (5) may not be referred to the juvenile court.

(b) Within five days after the day on which a habitual disruptive student behavior notice is issued, a representative of the school district or charter school shall provide documentation, to a parent of the qualifying minor who receives the notice, of the efforts made by a school counselor or representative under Subsection (3)(c).

§ 53G-9-604. Parental notification of certain incidents and threats required.

(1) A school shall:

(a) notify a parent if the parent's student threatens to commit suicide; or

(b) notify the parents of each student involved in an incident of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, or retaliation of the incident involving each parent's student.

(2)(a) If a school notifies a parent of an incident or threat required to be reported under Subsection (1), the school shall produce and maintain a record that verifies that the parent was notified of the incident or threat.

(b) A school shall maintain a record described in Subsection (2)(a) in accordance with the requirements of:

(i) Title 53E, Chapter 9, Part 2, Student Privacy;

(ii) Title 53E, Chapter 9, Part 3, Student Data Protection;

(iii) the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. Sec. 1232g; and

(iv) 34 C.F.R. Part 99.

(3) A local school board or charter school governing board shall adopt a policy regarding the process for:

(a) notifying a parent as required in Subsection (1); and

(b) producing and retaining a record that verifies that a parent was notified of an incident or threat as required in Subsection (2).

(4) At the request of a parent, a school may provide information and make recommendations related to an incident or threat described in Subsection (1).

(5) A school shall:

(a) provide a student a copy of a record maintained in accordance with this section that relates to the student if the student requests a copy of the record; and

(b) expunge a record maintained in accordance with this section that relates to a student if the student:

(i) has graduated from high school; and

(ii) requests the record be expunged.

§ 53G-9-605. Bullying, cyber-bullying, harassment, hazing, and retaliation policy.

(1) On or before September 1, 2018, an LEA governing board shall update the LEA governing board's bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation policy to include abusive conduct.

(3) The policy shall include the following components:

(e) as required in Section 53G-9-604, parental notification of:

(i) a student's threat to commit suicide; and

(ii) an incident of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, or retaliation, involving the parent's student;

REGULATIONS

R277-607-4. Compulsory education procedures .

A. LEAs shall:

(1) establish definitions not provided in law or this rule necessary to implement a compulsory attendance policy;

(2) include definitions of approved school activity under Section 53G-6-201 (9)(c) and excused absence to be provided locally under Section 53G-6-201 (9)(e);

(3) include criteria and procedures for preapproval of extended absences consistent with Section 53A- 11-101.3; and

(4) establish programs and meaningful incentives which promote regular, punctual student attendance.

B. LEAs shall include in their policies provisions for:

(1) notice to parents of the policy;

(2) notice to parents as discipline or consequences progress; and

(3) the opportunity to appeal disciplinary measures.

C. LEAs shall establish and publish procedures for use by school-age minors or their parents to contest notices of truancy.

R277-609-4. LEA responsibility to develop plans.

(2) An LEA shall include administration, instruction and support staff, students, parents, community council, and other community members in policy development, training, and prevention implementation so as to create a community sense of participation, ownership, support, and responsibility.

(3) A plan described in Subsection (1) shall include:

(u) provisions that account for an individual LEA's or school's unique needs or circumstances, including:

(iii) a provision for publication of notice to parents and school employees of policies by reasonable means.

R277-609-5. Physical restraint and seclusionary time out.

(2) If a public education employee physically restrains a student, the school or the public education employee shall immediately notify:

(a) the student's parent or guardian; and

(b) school administration.

(4) In addition to the notice described in Subsection (2), if a public education employee physically restrains a student for more than fifteen minutes, the school or the public education employee shall immediately notify:

(a) the student's parent or guardian; and

(b) school administration.

(7) If a student is placed in seclusionary time out, the school or the public education employee shall immediately notify:

(a) the student's parent or guardian; and

(b) school administration.

(9) In addition to the notice described in Subsection (7), if a public education employee places a student in seclusionary time out for more than fifteen minutes, the school or the public education employee shall immediately notify:

(a) the student's parent or guardian; and

(b) school administration.

R277-609-8. Parent/Guardian notification and court referral.

(1) Through school administrative and juvenile court referral consequences, LEA policies shall provide procedures for qualifying minors and their parents to participate in decisions regarding consequences for disruptive student behavior.

(2) An LEA shall establish policies that:

(a) provide notice to parents and information about resources available to assist a parent in resolving the parent's school-age minors' disruptive behavior;

(b) provide for notices of disruptive behavior to be issued by schools to qualifying minors and parents consistent with:

(i) numbers of disruptions and timelines in accordance with Section 53G-8-210;

(ii) school resources available;

(iii) cooperation from the appropriate juvenile court in accessing student school records, including:

(A) attendance;

(B) grades;

(C) behavioral reports; and

(D) other available student school data; and

(iv) provide due process procedures for minors and parents to contest allegations and citations of disruptive student behavior.

(3)(a) When a crisis situation occurs that requires the use of an emergency safety intervention to protect the student or others from harm, a school shall notify the LEA and the student's parent or guardian as soon as possible and no later than the end of the school day.

(b) In addition to the notice described in Subsection (3)(a), if a crisis situation occurs for more than fifteen minutes, the school shall immediately notify:

(i) the student's parent or guardian; and

(ii) school administration.

(d) A notice described in Subsection (3)(a) shall be documented within student information systems (SIS) records.

(4)(a) A school shall provide a parent or guardian with a copy of any notes or additional documentation taken during a crisis situation upon request of the parent or guardian.

(b) Within 24 hours of a crisis situation, a school shall notify a parent or guardian that the parent or guardian may request a copy of any notes or additional documentation taken during a crisis situation.

(c) A parent or guardian may request a time to meet with school staff and administration to discuss a crisis situation.

R277-613-4. LEA responsibility to createor updatebullying policies.

(2)(a) As required by Section 53G-9-605, an LEA shall notify a parent of:

(i) a parent's student's threat to commit suicide; or

(ii) an incident of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, or retaliation involving the parent's student as a targeted individual or an individual who is alleged to have engaged in prohibited conduct.

(b) An LEA shall:

(i) notify a parent described in Subsection (2)(a) in a timely manner;

(ii) designate the appropriate school employee to provide parental notification; and

(iii) designate the format in which notification is provided to parents and maintained by the LEA.

(3) Subject to the parental consent requirements of Section 53E-9-203, if applicable, an LEA shall assess students about the prevalence of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation in LEAs and schools, specifically locations where students are unsafe and additional adult supervision may be required, such as playgrounds, hallways, and lunch areas.

(4) An LEA shall take strong responsive action against retaliation, including assistance to targeted individuals and their parents in reporting subsequent problems and new incidents.

R277-613-5. Reporting and Incident Review of Allegations of Bullying, Cyber-bullying, Hazing, and Retaliation.

(6)(a) An alleged targeted individual is not required to participate in a restorative justice practice with an individual who is alleged to have engaged in prohibited conduct as described in Subsection (5)(a).

(b) If an LEA would like an alleged targeted individual who is a student to participate in a restorative justice practice, the LEA shall notify the alleged targeted individual's parent of the restorative justice practice and obtain consent from the alleged targeted individual's parent before including the alleged targeted individual in the process.

Sub Category
Reporting and referrals between schools and law enforcement
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-4-402. Powers and duties generally.

(23) A local school board may establish or partner with a certified youth court program, in accordance with Section 78A-6-1203, or establish or partner with a comparable restorative justice program, in coordination with schools in that district. A school may refer a student to youth court or a comparable restorative justice program in accordance with Section 53G-8-211.

§ 53G-8-210. Disruptive student behavior.

(1) As used in this section:

(a) "Disruptive student behavior" includes:

(i) the grounds for suspension or expulsion described in Section 53G-8-205; and

(ii) the conduct described in Subsection 53G-8-209(2)(b).

(b) "Parent" includes:

(i) a custodial parent of a school-age minor;

(ii) a legally appointed guardian of a school-age minor; or

(iii) any other person purporting to exercise any authority over the minor which could be exercised by a person described in Subsection (1)(b)(i) or (ii).

(c) "Qualifying minor" means a school-age minor who:

(i) is at least nine years old; or

(ii) turns nine years old at any time during the school year.

(d) "School year" means the period of time designated by a local school board or charter school governing board as the school year for the school where the school-age minor is enrolled.

(2) A local school board, school district, charter school governing board, or charter school may impose administrative penalties in accordance with Section 53G-8-211 on a school-age minor who violates this part.

(3)(a) A local school board or charter school governing board shall:

(i) authorize a school administrator or a designee of a school administrator to issue notices of disruptive student behavior to qualifying minors; and

(ii) establish a procedure for a qualifying minor, or a qualifying minor's parent, to contest a notice of disruptive student behavior.

(b) A school representative shall provide to a parent of a school-age minor, a list of resources available to assist the parent in resolving the school-age minor's disruptive student behavior problem.

(c) A local school board or charter school governing board shall establish procedures for a school counselor or other designated school representative to work with a qualifying minor who engages in disruptive student behavior in order to attempt to resolve the minor's disruptive student behavior problems.

(4) The notice of disruptive student behavior described in Subsection (3)(a):

(a) shall be issued to a qualifying minor who:

(i) engages in disruptive student behavior, that does not result in suspension or expulsion, three times during the school year; or

(ii) engages in disruptive student behavior, that results in suspension or expulsion, once during the school year;

(b) shall require that the qualifying minor and a parent of the qualifying minor:

(i) meet with school authorities to discuss the qualifying minor's disruptive student behavior; and

(ii) cooperate with the local school board or charter school governing board in correcting the school-age minor's disruptive student behavior; and

(c) shall be mailed by certified mail to, or served on, a parent of the qualifying minor.

(5) A habitual disruptive student behavior notice:

(a) may only be issued to a qualifying minor who:

(i) engages in disruptive student behavior, that does not result in suspension or expulsion, at least six times during the school year;

(ii)(A) engages in disruptive student behavior, that does not result in suspension or expulsion, at least three times during the school year; and

(B) engages in disruptive student behavior, that results in suspension or expulsion, at least once during the school year; or

(iii) engages in disruptive student behavior, that results in suspension or expulsion, at least twice during the school year; and

(b) may only be issued by a school administrator, a designee of a school administrator, or a truancy specialist, who is authorized by a local school board or charter school governing board to issue a habitual disruptive student behavior notice.

(6)(a) A qualifying minor to whom a habitual disruptive student behavior notice is issued under Subsection (5) may not be referred to the juvenile court.

(b) Within five days after the day on which a habitual disruptive student behavior notice is issued, a representative of the school district or charter school shall provide documentation, to a parent of the qualifying minor who receives the notice, of the efforts made by a school counselor or representative under Subsection (3)(c).

§ 53G-8-211. Responses to school-based behavior.

(1) As used in this section:

(a) "Evidence-based" means a program or practice that has:

(i) had multiple randomized control studies or a meta-analysis demonstrating that the program or practice is effective for a specific population;

(ii) been rated as effective by a standardized program evaluation tool; or

(iii) been approved by the state board.

(b) "Mobile crisis outreach team" means the same as that term is defined in Section 78A-6-105.

(c) "Restorative justice program" means a school-based program or a program used or adopted by a local education agency that is designed to enhance school safety, reduce school suspensions, and limit referrals to court, and is designed to help minors take responsibility for and repair the harm of behavior that occurs in school.

(d) "School administrator" means a principal of a school.

(e) "School is in session" means a day during which the school conducts instruction for which student attendance is counted toward calculating average daily membership.

(f) "School resource officer" means a law enforcement officer, as defined in Section 53-13-103, who contracts with, is employed by, or whose law enforcement agency contracts with a local education agency to provide law enforcement services for the local education agency.

(g)(i) "School-sponsored activity" means an activity, fundraising event, club, camp, clinic, or other event or activity that is authorized by a specific local education agency or public school, according to LEA governing board policy, and satisfies at least one of the following conditions:

(A) the activity is managed or supervised by a local education agency or public school, or local education agency or public school employee;

(B) the activity uses the local education agency or public school's facilities, equipment, or other school resources; or

(C) the activity is supported or subsidized, more than inconsequentially, by public funds, including the public school's activity funds or Minimum School Program dollars.

(ii) "School-sponsored activity" includes preparation for and involvement in a public performance, contest, athletic competition, demonstration, display, or club activity.

(h)(i) "Status offense" means a violation of the law that would not be a violation but for the age of the offender.

(ii) Notwithstanding Subsection (1)(h)(i), a status offense does not include a violation that by statute is made a misdemeanor or felony.

(2) This section applies to a minor enrolled in school who is alleged to have committed an offense at the school where the student is enrolled:

(a) on school property where the student is enrolled:

(i) when school is in session; or

(ii) during a school-sponsored activity; or

(b) that is truancy.

(3)(a) If the alleged offense is a class C misdemeanor, an infraction, a status offense on school property, or truancy, the minor may not be referred to law enforcement or court but may be referred to evidence-based alternative interventions, including:

(i) a mobile crisis outreach team, as defined in Section 78A-6-105;

(ii) a receiving center operated by the Division of Juvenile Justice Services in accordance with Section 62A-7-104;

(iii) a youth court or comparable restorative justice program;

(iv) evidence-based interventions created and developed by the school or school district; and

(v) other evidence-based interventions that may be jointly created and developed by a local education agency, the state board, the juvenile court, local counties and municipalities, the Department of Health, or the Department of Human Services.

(b) Notwithstanding Subsection (3)(a), a school resource officer may:

(i) investigate possible criminal offenses and conduct, including conducting probable cause searches;

(ii) consult with school administration about the conduct of a minor enrolled in a school;

(iii) transport a minor enrolled in a school to a location if the location is permitted by law;

(iv) take temporary custody of a minor pursuant to Subsection 78A-6-112(1); or

(v) protect the safety of students and the school community, including the use of reasonable and necessary physical force when appropriate based on the totality of the circumstances.

(c) Notwithstanding other provisions of this section, a law enforcement officer who has cause to believe a minor has committed an offense on school property when school is not in session nor during a school-sponsored activity, the law enforcement officer may refer the minor to court or may refer the minor to evidence-based alternative interventions at the discretion of the law enforcement officer.

(4)(a) Notwithstanding Subsection (3)(a) and subject to the requirements of this Subsection (4), a school district or school may refer a minor to court for a class C misdemeanor committed on school property or for being a habitual truant, as defined in Section 53G-6-201, if the minor refuses to participate in an evidence-based alternative intervention described in Subsection (3)(a).

(b)(i) When a minor is referred to court under Subsection (4)(a), the school shall appoint a school representative to continue to engage with the minor and the minor's family through the court process.

(ii) A school representative appointed under this Subsection (4)(b) may not be a school resource officer.

(c) A school district or school shall include the following in its referral to the court:

(i) attendance records for the minor;

(ii) a report of evidence-based alternative interventions used by the school before referral, including outcomes;

(iii) the name and contact information of the school representative assigned to actively participate in the court process with the minor and the minor's family; and

(iv) any other information the school district or school considers relevant.

(d) A minor referred to court under this Subsection (4), may not be ordered to or placed in secure detention, including for a contempt charge or violation of a valid court order under Section 78A-6-1101 when the underlying offense is a class C misdemeanor occurring on school property or habitual truancy.

(e) If a minor is referred to court under this Subsection (4), the court may use, when available, the resources of the Division of Juvenile Justice Services or the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health to address the minor.

(5) If the alleged offense is a class B misdemeanor or a class A misdemeanor, the minor may be referred directly to the juvenile court by the school administrator, the school administrator's designee, or a school resource officer, or the minor may be referred to the evidence-based alternative interventions in Subsection (3)(a).

§ 53G-8-402. Notification by juvenile court and law enforcement agencies.

(1) Notifications received from the juvenile court or law enforcement agencies by the school district pursuant to Subsections 78A-6-112(3)(b) and 78A-6-117(1)(b) are governed by this part.

(2) School districts may enter into agreements with law enforcement agencies for notification under Subsection (1).

§ 53G-8-403. Superintendent required to notify school.

(1) Within three days of receiving the information from the juvenile court or a law enforcement agency, the district superintendent shall notify the principal of the school the juvenile attends or last attended.

(2) Upon receipt of the information, the principal shall:

(a) make a notation in a secure file other than the student's permanent file; and

(b) if the student is still enrolled in the school, notify staff members who, in his opinion, should know of the adjudication.

(3) A person receiving information pursuant to this part may only disclose the information to other persons having both a right and a current need to know.

(4) Access to secure files shall be limited to persons authorized to receive information under this part.

§ 53G-8-506. Reporting of prohibited acts affecting a school -Confidentiality.

(1) A person who has reasonable cause to believe that an individual has committed a prohibited act shall, in accordance with Section 53G-8-211, immediately notify:

(a) the principal;

(b) an administrator of the affected school;

(c) the superintendent of the affected school district; or

(d) an administrator of the affected school district.

(2) If notice is given to a school official, the official may authorize an investigation into allegations involving school property, students, or school district employees.

(3) A school official may only refer a complaint of an alleged prohibited act reported as occurring on school grounds or in connection with school-sponsored activities to an appropriate law enforcement agency in accordance with Section 53G-8-211.

(4) The identity of persons making reports pursuant to this section shall be kept confidential.

§ 53G-8-802. State Safety and Support Program–State board duties.

(1) There is created the State Safety and Support Program.

(2) The state board shall:

(a) develop in conjunction with the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health model student safety and support policies for an LEA, including:

(i) evidence-based procedures for the assessment of and intervention with an individual whose behavior poses a threat to school safety;

(ii) procedures for referrals to law enforcement; and

(iii) procedures for referrals to a community services entity, a family support organization, or a health care provider for evaluation or treatment;

(b) provide training:

(i) in school safety;

(ii) in evidence-based approaches to improve school climate and address and correct bullying behavior;

(iii) in evidence-based approaches in identifying an individual who may pose a threat to the school community;

(iv) in evidence-based approaches in identifying an individual who may be showing signs or symptoms of mental illness;

(v) on permitted disclosures of student data to law enforcement and other support services under the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. Sec. 1232g; and

(vi) on permitted collection of student data under 20 U.S.C. Sec. 1232h and Sections 53E-9-203 and 53E-9-305;

(c) conduct and disseminate evidence-based research on school safety concerns;

(d) disseminate information on effective school safety initiatives;

(e) encourage partnerships between public and private sectors to promote school safety;

(f) provide technical assistance to an LEA in the development and implementation of school safety initiatives;

(g) in conjunction with the Department of Public Safety, develop and make available to an LEA a model critical incident response training program that includes protocols for conducting a threat assessment, and ensuring building security during an incident;

(h) provide space for the public safety liaison described in Section 53-1-106 and the school-based mental health specialist described in Section 62A-15-103;

(i) create a model school climate survey that may be used by an LEA to assess stakeholder perception of a school environment and adopt rules:

(i) requiring an LEA to:

(A) create or adopt and disseminate a school climate survey; and

(B) disseminate the school climate survey;

(ii) recommending the distribution method, survey frequency, and sample size of the survey; and

(iii) specifying the areas of content for the school climate survey; and

(j) collect aggregate data and school climate survey results from each LEA.

(3) Nothing in this section requires an individual to respond to a school climate survey.

§ 76-5-102.3. Assault against school employees.

(1) Any person who commits an assault as defined in Section 76-5-102 or commits a threat of violence as defined in Section 76-5-107, against an employee of a public or private school, with knowledge that the individual is an employee, and when the employee is acting within the scope of his authority as an employee, is guilty of a class A misdemeanor.

(2) As used in this section, "employee" includes a volunteer.

§ 76-5-107.5. Prohibition of "hazing"–Definitions–Penalties.

(1) A person is guilty of hazing if that person intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly commits an act or causes another to commit an act that:

(a)(i) endangers the mental or physical health or safety of another;

(ii) involves any brutality of a physical nature such as whipping, beating, branding, calisthenics, bruising, electric shocking, placing of a harmful substance on the body, or exposure to the elements;

(iii) involves consumption of any food, alcoholic product, drug, or other substance or any other physical activity that endangers the mental or physical health and safety of an individual; or

(iv) involves any activity that would subject the individual to extreme mental stress, such as sleep deprivation, extended isolation from social contact, or conduct that subjects another to extreme embarrassment, shame, or humiliation; and

(b)(i) is for the purpose of initiation, admission into, affiliation with, holding office in, or as a condition for continued membership in any organization; or

(ii) if the actor knew that the victim is a member of or candidate for membership with a school team or school organization to which the actor belongs or did belong within the preceding two years.

(2) It is not a defense to prosecution of hazing that a person under 21, against whom the hazing was directed, consented to or acquiesced in the hazing activity.

(3) An actor who hazes another is guilty of a:

(a) class B misdemeanor except as provided in Subsection (3)(b), (c), (d), or (e);

(b) class A misdemeanor if the act involves:

(i) the operation or other use of a motor vehicle;

(ii) the consumption of an alcoholic product as defined in Section 32B-1-102; or

(iii) the consumption of a drug or a substance as defined in Section 76-5-113;

(c) third degree felony if the act involves the use of a dangerous weapon as defined in Section 76-1-601;

(d) third degree felony if the hazing results in serious bodily injury to a person; or

(e) second degree felony if hazing under Subsection (3)(d) involves the use of a dangerous weapon as defined in Section 76-1-601.

(4) A person who in good faith reports or participates in reporting of an alleged hazing is not subject to any civil or criminal liability regarding the reporting.

(5)(a) This section does not apply to military training or other official military activities.

(b) Military conduct is governed by Title 39, Chapter 6, Utah Code of Military Justice.

(6)(a) A prosecution under this section does not bar a prosecution of the actor for:

(i) any other offense for which the actor may be liable as a party for conduct committed by the person hazed; or

(ii) any offense, caused in the course of the hazing, that the actor commits against the person who is hazed.

(b) Under Subsection (6)(a)(i) a person may be separately punished, both for the hazing offense and the conduct committed by the person hazed.

(c) Under Subsection (6)(a)(ii) a person may not be punished both for hazing and for the other offense, but shall be punished for the offense carrying the greater maximum penalty.

§ 76-8-1402. Disruption of activities in or near school building–Failure to leave–Reentry–Penalties.

(1) In the absence of a local ordinance or other controlling law governing the conduct described in this Subsection (1), a person is guilty of an offense under Subsection (2) who, while on a street, sidewalk, or public way adjacent to any school building or ground:

(a) by his or her presence or acts, materially disrupts the peaceful conduct of school activities; and

(b) remains upon the place under Subsection (1)(a) after being asked to leave by the chief administrator of that school.

(2)(a) A violation of Subsection (1) is subject to the penalties under Subsection (2)(b) unless the violation constitutes another offense subject to a greater penalty.

(b)(i) The first and second violation of Subsection (1) are class B misdemeanors.

(ii) A third and any subsequent violations of Subsection (1) are class A misdemeanors.

§ 76-9-106. Disrupting the operation of a school.

(1) A person is guilty of disrupting the operation of a school if the person, after being asked to leave by a school official, remains on school property for the purpose of encouraging or creating an unreasonable and substantial disruption or risk of disruption of a class, activity, program, or other function of a public or private school.

(2) For purposes of this section, "school property" includes property being used by a public or private school for a school function.

(3) Disrupting the operation of a school is a class B misdemeanor.

§ 76-9-107. Unauthorized entry of school bus–Posting of warning on school buses.

(1) As used in this section:

(a) "Driver" means the driver of the school bus.

(b) "School bus" means every publicly or privately owned motor vehicle designed for transporting 10 or more passengers and operated for the transportation of children to or from school or school activities.

(2) A person is guilty of a class B misdemeanor if the person:

(a) enters a school bus with the intent to commit a criminal offense;

(b) enters a school bus and disrupts or interferes with the driver; or

(c) enters a school bus and refuses to leave the bus after being ordered to leave by the driver and the person:

(i) is not a peace officer acting within the scope of his or her authority as a peace officer;

(ii) is not authorized by the school district to board the bus as a student or as an individual employed by the school district or volunteering as a participant in a school activity;

(iii) causes or attempts to cause a disruption or an annoyance to any passenger on the bus; or

(iv) is reckless as to whether the person's presence or behavior will cause fear on the part of any passenger on the bus.

(3) Each school district shall ensure that clearly legible signs be placed on each school bus, next to each entrance to the bus, warning that unauthorized entry of a school bus is a violation of state law.

§ 76-10-505.5. Possession of a dangerous weapon, firearm, or short barreled shotgun on or about school premises–Penalties.

(1) As used in this section, "on or about school premises" means:

(a)(i) in a public or private elementary or secondary school; or

(ii) on the grounds of any of those schools;

(b)(i) in a public or private institution of higher education; or

(ii) on the grounds of a public or private institution of higher education; and

(iii)(A) inside the building where a preschool or child care is being held, if the entire building is being used for the operation of the preschool or child care; or

(B) if only a portion of a building is being used to operate a preschool or child care, in that room or rooms where the preschool or child care operation is being held.

(2) A person may not possess any dangerous weapon, firearm, or short barreled shotgun, as those terms are defined in Section 76-10-501, at a place that the person knows, or has reasonable cause to believe, is on or about school premises as defined in this section.

(3)(a) Possession of a dangerous weapon on or about school premises is a class B misdemeanor.

(b) Possession of a firearm or short barreled shotgun on or about school premises is a class A misdemeanor.

(4) This section does not apply if:

(a) the person is authorized to possess a firearm as provided under Section 53-5-704, 53-5-705, 76-10-511, or 76-10-523, or as otherwise authorized by law;

(b) the possession is approved by the responsible school administrator;

(c) the item is present or to be used in connection with a lawful, approved activity and is in the possession or under the control of the person responsible for its possession or use; or

(d) the possession is:

(i) at the person's place of residence or on the person's property; or

(ii) in any vehicle lawfully under the person's control, other than a vehicle owned by the school or used by the school to transport students.

(5) This section does not prohibit prosecution of a more serious weapons offense that may occur on or about school premises.

§ 76-10-1235. Accessing pornographic or indecent material on school property.

(1) As used in this section:

(a) "Pornographic or indecent material" means any material:

(i) defined as harmful to minors in Section 76-10-1201;

(ii) described as pornographic in Section 76-10-1203; or

(iii) described in Section 76-10-1227.

(b) "School property" means property, including land and improvements, that a school district or charter school owns, leases, or occupies.

(2) Except as provided in Subsection (3), a person is guilty of accessing pornographic or indecent material on school property when the person willfully or knowingly creates, views, or otherwise gains access to pornographic or indecent material while present on school property, under circumstances not amounting to an attempted or actual violation of:

(a) distributing pornographic material as specified in Section 76-10-1204;

(b) inducing acceptance of pornographic material as specified in Section 76-10-1205;

(c) dealing in material harmful to a minor as specified in Section 76-10-1206; or

(d) indecent public displays as specified in Section 76-10-1228.

(3) This section does not apply to school or law enforcement personnel when the access to pornographic or indecent material on school property is limited to:

(a) investigation of a violation of this section; or

(b) enforcement of this section.

(4) Each separate offense under this section is:

(a) a class A misdemeanor if the person is 18 years of age or older; and

(b) a class B misdemeanor if the person is under 18 years of age.

(5) This section does not prohibit disciplinary action for actions that violate this section.

REGULATIONS

R277-609-4. LEA responsibility to develop plans.

(3) A plan described in Subsection (1) shall include:

(p) a requirement to provide for documentation of disruptive student behavior prior to referral of disruptive students to juvenile court;

(u) provisions that account for an individual LEA's or school's unique needs or circumstances, including:

(i) the role of law enforcement; and

R277-609-8. Parent/Guardian notification and court referral.

(1) Through school administrative and juvenile court referral consequences, LEA policies shall provide procedures for qualifying minors and their parents to participate in decisions regarding consequences for disruptive student behavior.

Sub Category
Disclosure of school records
Statute

LAWS

§ 53E-9-202. Application of state and federal law to the administration and operation of public schools–Local school board and charter school governing board policies.

(1) As used in this section "education entity" means:

(a) the state board;

(b) a local school board or charter school governing board;

(c) a school district;

(d) a public school; or

(e) the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind.

(2) An education entity and an employee, student aide, volunteer, third party contractor, or other agent of an education entity shall protect the privacy of a student, the student's parents, and the student's family and support parental involvement in the education of their children through compliance with the protections provided for family and student privacy under this part and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act and related provisions under 20 U.S.C. Secs. 1232g and 1232h, in the administration and operation of all public-school programs, regardless of the source of funding.

(3) A local school board or charter school governing board shall enact policies governing the protection of family and student privacy as required by this part.

§ 53E-9-203. Activities prohibited without prior written consent–Validity of consent–Qualifications–Training on implementation.

(1) Except as provided in Subsection (7), Section 53G-9-604, and Section 53G-9-702, policies adopted by a school district or charter school under Section 53E-9-202 shall include prohibitions on the administration to a student of any psychological or psychiatric examination, test, or treatment, or any survey, analysis, or evaluation without the prior written consent of the student's parent, in which the purpose or evident intended effect is to cause the student to reveal information, whether the information is personally identifiable or not, concerning the student's or any family member's:

(a) political affiliations or, except as provided under Section 53G-10-202 or rules of the state board, political philosophies;

(b) mental or psychological problems;

(c) sexual behavior, orientation, or attitudes;

(d) illegal, anti-social, self-incriminating, or demeaning behavior;

(e) critical appraisals of individuals with whom the student or family member has close family relationships;

(f) religious affiliations or beliefs;

(g) legally recognized privileged and analogous relationships, such as those with lawyers, medical personnel, or ministers; and

(h) income, except as required by law.

(2) Prior written consent under Subsection (1) is required in all grades, kindergarten through grade 12.

(3) Except as provided in Subsection (7), Section 53G-9-604, and Section 53G-9-702, the prohibitions under Subsection (1) shall also apply within the curriculum and other school activities unless prior written consent of the student's parent has been obtained.

(4)(a) Written parental consent is valid only if a parent has been first given written notice, including notice that a copy of the educational or student survey questions to be asked of the student in obtaining the desired information is made available at the school, and a reasonable opportunity to obtain written information concerning:

(i) records or information, including information about relationships, that may be examined or requested;

(ii) the means by which the records or information shall be examined or reviewed;

(iii) the means by which the information is to be obtained;

(iv) the purposes for which the records or information are needed;

(v) the entities or persons, regardless of affiliation, who will have access to the personally identifiable information; and

(vi) a method by which a parent of a student can grant permission to access or examine the personally identifiable information.

(b) For a survey described in Subsection (1), written notice described in Subsection (4)(a) shall include an Internet address where a parent can view the exact survey to be administered to the parent's student.

(5)(a) Except in response to a situation which a school employee reasonably believes to be an emergency, or as authorized under Title 62A, Chapter 4a, Part 4, Child Abuse or Neglect Reporting Requirements, or by order of a court, disclosure to a parent must be given at least two weeks before information protected under this section is sought.

(b) Following disclosure, a parent may waive the two week minimum notification period.

(c) Unless otherwise agreed to by a student's parent and the person requesting written consent, the authorization is valid only for the activity for which it was granted.

(d) A written withdrawal of authorization submitted to the school principal by the authorizing parent terminates the authorization.

(e) A general consent used to approve admission to school or involvement in special education, remedial education, or a school activity does not constitute written consent under this section.

(6)(a) This section does not limit the ability of a student under Section 53G-10-203 to spontaneously express sentiments or opinions otherwise protected against disclosure under this section.

(b)(i) If a school employee or agent believes that a situation exists which presents a serious threat to the well-being of a student, that employee or agent shall notify the student's parent or guardian without delay.

(ii) If, however, the matter has been reported to the Division of Child and Family Services within the Department of Human Services, it is the responsibility of the division to notify the student's parent or guardian of any possible investigation, prior to the student's return home from school.

(iii) The division may be exempted from the notification requirements described in this Subsection (6)(b)(ii) only if it determines that the student would be endangered by notification of his parent or guardian, or if that notification is otherwise prohibited by state or federal law.

(7)(a) If a school employee, agent, or school resource officer believes a student is at-risk of attempting suicide, physical self-harm, or harming others, the school employee, agent, or school resource officer may intervene and ask a student questions regarding the student's suicidal thoughts, physically self-harming behavior, or thoughts of harming others for the purposes of:

(i) referring the student to appropriate prevention services; and

(ii) informing the student's parent or legal guardian.

(b) On or before September 1, 2014, a school district or charter school shall develop and adopt a policy regarding intervention measures consistent with Subsection (7)(a) while requiring the minimum degree of intervention to accomplish the goals of this section.

(8) Local school boards and charter school governing boards shall provide inservice for teachers and administrators on the implementation of this section.

(9) The board shall provide procedures for disciplinary action for violations of this section.

§ 53E-9-204. Access to education records–Training requirement–Certification.

(1) As used in this section, "education record" means the same as that term is defined in the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. Sec. 1232g.

(2) A local school board or charter school governing board shall require each public school to:

(a) create and maintain a list that includes the name and position of each school employee who the public school authorizes, in accordance with Subsection (4), to have access to an education record; and

(b) provide the list described in Subsection (2)(a) to the school's local school board or charter school governing board.

(3) A local school board or charter school governing board shall:

(a) provide training on student privacy laws; and

(b) require a school employee on the list described in Subsection (2) to:

(i) complete the training described in Subsection (3)(a); and

(ii) provide to the local school board or charter school governing board a certified statement, signed by the school employee, that certifies that the school employee completed the training described in Subsection (3)(a) and that the school employee understands student privacy requirements.

(4)(a) Except as provided in Subsection (4)(b), a local school board, charter school governing board, public school, or school employee may only share an education record with a school employee if:

(i) that school employee's name is on the list described in Subsection (2); and

(ii) federal and state privacy laws authorize the education record to be shared with that school employee.

(b) A local school board, charter school governing board, public school, or school employee may share an education record with a school employee if the board, school, or employee obtains written consent from:

(i) the parent of the student to whom the education record relates, if the student is younger than 18 years old; or

(ii) the student to whom the education record relates, if the student is 18 years old or older.

§ 53G-8-404. Board to set procedures.

The state board shall make rules governing the dissemination of the information.

§ 53G-8-405. Liability for release of information.

(1) The district superintendent, principal, and any staff member notified by the principal may not be held liable for information which may become public knowledge unless it can be shown by clear and convincing evidence that the information became public knowledge through an intentional act of the superintendent, principal, or a staff member.

(2) A person receiving information under Subsection 78A-6-112(3)(b), 78A-6-117(1)(b), or Section 53G-8-403 is immune from any liability, civil or criminal, for acting or failing to act in response to the information unless the person acts or fails to act due to malice, gross negligence, or deliberate indifference to the consequences.

§ 53G-9-604. Parental notification of certain incidents and threats required.

(1) A school shall:

(a) notify a parent if the parent's student threatens to commit suicide; or

(b) notify the parents of each student involved in an incident of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, or retaliation of the incident involving each parent's student.

(2)(a) If a school notifies a parent of an incident or threat required to be reported under Subsection (1), the school shall produce and maintain a record that verifies that the parent was notified of the incident or threat.

(b) A school shall maintain a record described in Subsection (2)(a) in accordance with the requirements of:

(i) Title 53E, Chapter 9, Part 2, Student Privacy;

(ii) Title 53E, Chapter 9, Part 3, Student Data Protection;

(iii) the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. Sec. 1232g; and

(iv) 34 C.F.R. Part 99.

(3) A local school board or charter school governing board shall adopt a policy regarding the process for:

(a) notifying a parent as required in Subsection (1); and

(b) producing and retaining a record that verifies that a parent was notified of an incident or threat as required in Subsection (2).

(4) At the request of a parent, a school may provide information and make recommendations related to an incident or threat described in Subsection (1).

(5) A school shall:

(a) provide a student a copy of a record maintained in accordance with this section that relates to the student if the student requests a copy of the record; and

(b) expunge a record maintained in accordance with this section that relates to a student if the student:

(i) has graduated from high school; and

(ii) requests the record be expunged.

REGULATIONS

R277-709-9. Confidentiality.

(1) An LEA shall issue transcripts and diplomas prepared for youth in custody in the name of an existing LEA, which also serves non-custodial youth and shall not bear references to custodial status.

(2) School records which refer to custodial status, juvenile court records, and related matters shall be kept separate from permanent school records, but are nonetheless student records if retained by the LEA.

(3)(a) Members of the interagency team which design and oversee student education plans shall have access, through team member representatives of the participating agencies, to relevant records of the various agencies.

(b) The records and information obtained from the records remain the property of the supplying agency and shall not be transferred or shared with other persons or agencies without the permission of the supplying agency, the student's legal guardian, or the eligible student as defined under 20 U.S.C. 1232g(d).

(4) Youth in custody programs shall comply with all state and federal privacy requirements for student records.

Sub Category
Data collection, review, and reporting of disciplinary policies and actions
Statute

LAWS

§ 53E-3-301. Appointment–Qualifications–Duties.

(3) The state superintendent shall perform duties assigned by the state board, including:

(a) investigating all matters pertaining to the public schools;

(b) adopting and keeping an official seal to authenticate the state superintendent's official acts;

(c) holding and conducting meetings, seminars, and conferences on educational topics;

(d) collecting and organizing education data into an automated decision support system to facilitate school district and school improvement planning, accountability reporting, performance recognition, and the evaluation of educational policy and program effectiveness to include:

(i) data that are:

(A) comparable across schools and school districts;

(B) appropriate for use in longitudinal studies; and

(C) comprehensive with regard to the data elements required under applicable state or federal law or state board rule;

(ii) features that enable users, most particularly school administrators, teachers, and parents, to:

(A) retrieve school and school district level data electronically;

(B) interpret the data visually; and

(C) draw conclusions that are statistically valid; and

(iii) procedures for the collection and management of education data that:

(A) require the state superintendent to:

(I) collaborate with school districts and charter schools in designing and implementing uniform data standards and definitions;

(II) undertake or sponsor research to implement improved methods for analyzing education data;

(III) provide for data security to prevent unauthorized access to or contamination of the data; and

(IV) protect the confidentiality of data under state and federal privacy laws; and

(B) require all school districts and schools to comply with the data collection and management procedures established under Subsection (3) (d);

(e) administering and implementing federal educational programs in accordance with Part 8, Implementing Federal or National Education Programs; and

(f) with the approval of the state board, preparing and submitting to the governor a budget for the state board to be included in the budget that the governor submits to the Legislature.

§ 53E-3-516. School disciplinary and law enforcement action report–Rulemaking authority.

(1) As used in this section:

(a) "Disciplinary action" means an action by a public school meant to formally discipline a student of that public school that includes a suspension or expulsion.

(b) "Law enforcement agency" means the same as that term is defined in Section 77-7a-103.

(c) "Minor" means the same as that term is defined in Section 53G-6-201.

(d) "Other law enforcement activity" means a significant law enforcement interaction with a minor that does not result in an arrest, including:

(i) a search and seizure by an SRO;

(ii) issuance of a criminal citation;

(iii) issuance of a ticket or summons;

(iv) filing a delinquency petition; or

(v) referral to a probation officer.

(e) "School is in session" means the hours of a day during which a public school conducts instruction for which student attendance is counted toward calculating average daily membership.

(f)(i) "School-sponsored activity" means an activity, fundraising event, club, camp, clinic, or other event or activity that is authorized by a specific public school, according to LEA governing board policy, and satisfies at least one of the following conditions:

(A) the activity is managed or supervised by a school district, public school, or public school employee;

(B) the activity uses the school district or public school facilities, equipment, or other school resources; or

(C) the activity is supported or subsidized, more than inconsequentially, by public funds, including the public school's activity funds or Minimum School Program dollars.

(ii) "School-sponsored activity" includes preparation for and involvement in a public performance, contest, athletic competition, demonstration, display, or club activity.

(g) "Student resource officer" or "SRO" means the same as that term is defined in Section 53G-8-701.

(2) Beginning on July 1, 2020, the state board, in collaboration with school districts, charter schools, and law enforcement agencies, shall develop an annual report regarding the following incidents that occur on school grounds while school is in session or during a school-sponsored activity:

(a) arrests of a minor;

(b) other law enforcement activities; and

(c) disciplinary actions.

(3) The report described in Subsection (2) shall include the following information by school district and charter school:

(a) the number of arrests of a minor, including the reason why the minor was arrested;

(b) the number of other law enforcement activities, including the following information for each incident:

(i) the reason for the other law enforcement activity; and

(ii) the type of other law enforcement activity used;

(c) the number of disciplinary actions imposed, including:

(i) the reason for the disciplinary action; and

(ii) the type of disciplinary action; and

(d) the number of SROs employed.

(4) The report described in Subsection (2) shall include the following information, in aggregate, for each element described in Subsections (3)(a) through (c):

(a) age;

(b) grade level;

(c) race;

(d) sex; and

(e) disability status.

(5) Information included in the annual report described in Subsection (2) shall comply with:

(a) Chapter 9, Part 3, Student Data Protection;

(b) Chapter 9, Part 2, Student Privacy; and

(c) the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. Secs. 1232g and 1232h.

(6) The state board shall make rules to compile the report described in Subsection (2).

(7) The state board shall provide the report described in Subsection (2) in accordance with Section 53E-1-203 for incidents that occurred during the previous school year.

§ 53E-9-301. Definitions.

As used in this part:

(1) "Adult student" means a student who:

(a) is at least 18 years old;

(b) is an emancipated student; or

(c) qualifies under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Improvements Act of 2001, 42 U.S.C. Sec. 11431 et seq.

(2) "Aggregate data" means data that:

(a) are totaled and reported at the group, cohort, school, school district, region, or state level with at least 10 individuals in the level;

(b) do not reveal personally identifiable student data; and

(c) are collected in accordance with state board rule.

(3)(a) "Biometric identifier" means a:

(i) retina or iris scan;

(ii) fingerprint;

(iii) human biological sample used for valid scientific testing or screening; or

(iv) scan of hand or face geometry.

(b) "Biometric identifier" does not include:

(i) a writing sample;

(ii) a written signature;

(iii) a voiceprint;

(iv) a photograph;

(v) demographic data; or

(vi) a physical description, such as height, weight, hair color, or eye color.

(4) "Biometric information" means information, regardless of how the information is collected, converted, stored, or shared:

(a) based on an individual's biometric identifier; and

(b) used to identify the individual.

(5) "Data breach" means an unauthorized release of or unauthorized access to personally identifiable student data that is maintained by an education entity.

(6) "Data governance plan" means an education entity's comprehensive plan for managing education data that:

(a) incorporates reasonable data industry best practices to maintain and protect student data and other education-related data;

(b) describes the role, responsibility, and authority of an education entity data governance staff member;

(c) provides for necessary technical assistance, training, support, and auditing;

(d) describes the process for sharing student data between an education entity and another person;

(e) describes the education entity's data expungement process, including how to respond to requests for expungement;

(f) describes the data breach response process; and

(g) is published annually and available on the education entity's website.

(7) "Education entity" means:

(a) the state board;

(b) a local school board;

(c) a charter school governing board;

(d) a school district;

(e) a charter school; or

(f) the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind.

(8) "Expunge" means to seal or permanently delete data, as described in state board rule made under Section 53E-9-306.

(9) "General audience application" means an Internet website, online service, online application, mobile application, or software program that:

(a) is not specifically intended for use by an audience member that attends kindergarten or a grade from 1 to 12, although an audience member may attend kindergarten or a grade from 1 to 12; and

(b) is not subject to a contract between an education entity and a third-party contractor.

(10) "Local education agency" or "LEA" means:

(a) a school district;

(b) a charter school; or

(c) the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind.

(11) "Metadata dictionary" means a record that:

(a) defines and discloses all personally identifiable student data collected and shared by the education entity;

(b) comprehensively lists all recipients with whom the education entity has shared personally identifiable student data, including:

(i) the purpose for sharing the data with the recipient;

(ii) the justification for sharing the data, including whether sharing the data was required by federal law, state law, or a local directive; and

(iii) how sharing the data is permitted under federal or state law; and

(c) without disclosing personally identifiable student data, is displayed on the education entity's website.

(12) "Necessary student data" means data required by state statute or federal law to conduct the regular activities of an education entity, including:

(a) name;

(b) date of birth;

(c) sex;

(d) parent contact information;

(e) custodial parent information;

(f) contact information;

(g) a student identification number;

(h) local, state, and national assessment results or an exception from taking a local, state, or national assessment;

(i) courses taken and completed, credits earned, and other transcript information;

(j) course grades and grade point average;

(k) grade level and expected graduation date or graduation cohort;

(l) degree, diploma, credential attainment, and other school exit information;

(m) attendance and mobility;

(n) drop-out data;

(o) immunization record or an exception from an immunization record;

(p) race;

(q) ethnicity;

(r) tribal affiliation;

(s) remediation efforts;

(t) an exception from a vision screening required under Section 53G-9-404 or information collected from a vision screening described in Section 53G-9-404;

(u) information related to the Utah Registry of Autism and Developmental Disabilities, described in Section 26-7-4;

(v) student injury information;

(w) a disciplinary record created and maintained as described in Section 53E-9-306;

(x) juvenile delinquency records;

(y) English language learner status; and

(z) child find and special education evaluation data related to initiation of an IEP.

(13)(a) "Optional student data" means student data that is not:

(i) necessary student data; or

(ii) student data that an education entity may not collect under Section 53E-9-305.

(b) "Optional student data" includes:

(i) information that is:

(A) related to an IEP or needed to provide special needs services; and

(B) not necessary student data;

(ii) biometric information; and

(iii) information that is not necessary student data and that is required for a student to participate in a federal or other program.

(14) "Parent" means:

(a) a student's parent;

(b) a student's legal guardian; or

(c) an individual who has written authorization from a student's parent or legal guardian to act as a parent or legal guardian on behalf of the student.

(15)(a) "Personally identifiable student data" means student data that identifies or is used by the holder to identify a student.

(b) "Personally identifiable student data" includes:

(i) a student's first and last name;

(ii) the first and last name of a student's family member;

(iii) a student's or a student's family's home or physical address;

(iv) a student's email address or other online contact information;

(v) a student's telephone number;

(vi) a student's social security number;

(vii) a student's biometric identifier;

(viii) a student's health or disability data;

(ix) a student's education entity student identification number;

(x) a student's social media user name and password or alias;

(xi) if associated with personally identifiable student data, the student's persistent identifier, including:

(A) a customer number held in a cookie; or

(B) a processor serial number;

(xii) a combination of a student's last name or photograph with other information that together permits a person to contact the student online;

(xiii) information about a student or a student's family that a person collects online and combines with other personally identifiable student data to identify the student; and

(xiv) information that, alone or in combination, is linked or linkable to a specific student that would allow a reasonable person in the school community, who does not have personal knowledge of the relevant circumstances, to identify the student with reasonable certainty.

(16) "School official" means an employee or agent of an education entity, if the education entity has authorized the employee or agent to request or receive student data on behalf of the education entity.

(17)(a) "Student data" means information about a student at the individual student level.

(b) "Student data" does not include aggregate or de-identified data.

(18) "Student data manager" means:

(a) the state student data officer; or

(b) an individual designated as a student data manager by an education entity under Section 53E-9-303, who fulfills the duties described in Section 53E-9-308.

(19)(a) "Targeted advertising" means presenting advertisements to a student where the advertisement is selected based on information obtained or inferred over time from that student's online behavior, usage of applications, or student data.

(b) "Targeted advertising" does not include advertising to a student:

(i) at an online location based upon that student's current visit to that location; or

(ii) in response to that student's request for information or feedback, without retention of that student's online activities or requests over time for the purpose of targeting subsequent ads.

(20) "Third-party contractor" means a person who:

(a) is not an education entity; and

(b) pursuant to a contract with an education entity, collects or receives student data in order to provide a product or service, as described in the contract, if the product or service is not related to school photography, yearbooks, graduation announcements, or a similar product or service.

(21) "Written consent" means written authorization to collect or share a student's student data, from:

(a) the student's parent, if the student is not an adult student; or

(b) the student, if the student is an adult student.

§ 53E-9-302. State student data protection governance.

(1)(a) An education entity or a third-party contractor who collects, uses, stores, shares, or deletes student data shall protect student data as described in this part.

(b) The state board shall make rules to administer this part, including student data protection standards for public education employees, student aides, and volunteers.

(2) The state board shall oversee the preparation and maintenance of:

(a) a statewide data governance plan; and

(b) a state-level metadata dictionary.

(3) As described in this Subsection (3), the state board shall establish advisory groups to oversee student data protection in the state and make recommendations to the state board regarding student data protection.

(a) The state board shall establish a student data policy advisory group:

(i) composed of members from:

(A) the Legislature;

(B) the state board and state board employees; and

(C) one or more LEAs;

(ii) to discuss and make recommendations to the state board regarding:

(A) enacted or proposed legislation; and

(B) state and local student data protection policies across the state;

(iii) that reviews and monitors the state student data governance plan; and

(iv) that performs other tasks related to student data protection as designated by the state board.

(b) The state board shall establish a student data governance advisory group:

(i) composed of the state student data officer and other state board employees; and

(ii) that performs duties related to state and local student data protection, including:

(A) overseeing data collection and usage by state board program offices; and

(B) preparing and maintaining the state board's student data governance plan under the direction of the student data policy advisory group.

(c) The state board shall establish a student data users advisory group:

(i) composed of members who use student data at the local level; and

(ii) that provides feedback and suggestions on the practicality of actions proposed by the student data policy advisory group and the student data governance advisory group.

(4)(a) The state board shall designate a state student data officer.

(b) The state student data officer shall:

(i) act as the primary point of contact for state student data protection administration in assisting the state board to administer this part;

(ii) ensure compliance with student privacy laws throughout the public education system, including:

(A) providing training and support to applicable state board and LEA employees; and

(B) producing resource materials, model plans, and model forms for local student data protection governance, including a model student data collection notice;

(iii) investigate complaints of alleged violations of this part;

(iv) report violations of this part to:

(A) the state board;

(B) an applicable education entity; and

(C) the student data policy advisory group; and

(v) act as a state level student data manager.

(5) The state board shall designate:

(a) at least one support manager to assist the state student data officer; and

(b) a student data protection auditor to assist the state student data officer.

(6) The state board shall establish a research review process for a request for data for the purpose of research or evaluation.

§ 53E-9-303. Local student data protection governance.

(1) An LEA shall adopt policies to protect student data in accordance with this part and state board rule, taking into account the specific needs and priorities of the LEA.

(2)(a) An LEA shall designate an individual to act as a student data manager to fulfill the responsibilities of a student data manager described in Section 53E-9-308.

(b) If possible, an LEA shall designate the LEA's records officer as defined in Section 63G-2-103, as the student data manager.

(3) An LEA shall create and maintain an LEA:

(a) data governance plan; and

(b) metadata dictionary.

(4) An LEA shall establish an external research review process for a request for data for the purpose of external research or evaluation.

§ 53E-9-304. Student data ownership–Notification in case of breach.

(1)(a) A student owns the student's personally identifiable student data.

(b) An education entity shall allow the following individuals to access a student's student data that is maintained by the education entity:

(i) the student's parent;

(ii) the student; and

(iii) in accordance with the education entity's internal policy described in Section 53E-9-303 and in the absence of a parent, an individual acting as a parent to the student.

(2)(a) If a significant data breach occurs at an education entity, the education entity shall notify:

(i) the student, if the student is an adult student; or

(ii) the student's parent, if the student is not an adult student.

(b) The state board shall make rules to define a significant data breach described in Subsection (2)(a).

§ 53E-9-305. Collecting student data–Prohibition–Student data disclosure statement–Authorization.

(1) An education entity may not collect a student's:

(a) social security number; or

(b) except as required in Section 78A-6-112, criminal record.

(2) An education entity that collects student data shall, in accordance with this section, prepare and distribute, except as provided in Subsection (3), to parents and students a student data collection notice statement that:

(a) is a prominent, stand-alone document;

(b) is annually updated and published on the education entity's website;

(c) states the student data that the education entity collects;

(d) states that the education entity will not collect the student data described in Subsection (1);

(e) states the student data described in Section 53E-9-308 that the education entity may not share without written consent;

(f) includes the following statement:

"The collection, use, and sharing of student data has both benefits and risks. Parents and students should learn about these benefits and risks and make choices regarding student data accordingly.";

(g) describes in general terms how the education entity stores and protects student data; and

(h) states a student's rights under this part.

(3) The state board may publicly post the state board's collection notice described in Subsection (2).

(4) An education entity may collect the necessary student data of a student if the education entity provides a student data collection notice to:

(a) the student, if the student is an adult student; or

(b) the student's parent, if the student is not an adult student.

(5) An education entity may collect optional student data if the education entity:

(a) provides, to an individual described in Subsection (4), a student data collection notice that includes a description of:

(i) the optional student data to be collected; and

(ii) how the education entity will use the optional student data; and

(b) obtains written consent to collect the optional student data from an individual described in Subsection (4).

(6) An education entity may collect a student's biometric identifier or biometric information if the education entity:

(a) provides, to an individual described in Subsection (4), a biometric information collection notice that is separate from a student data collection notice, which states:

(i) the biometric identifier or biometric information to be collected;

(ii) the purpose of collecting the biometric identifier or biometric information; and

(iii) how the education entity will use and store the biometric identifier or biometric information; and

(b) obtains written consent to collect the biometric identifier or biometric information from an individual described in Subsection (4).

(7) Except under the circumstances described in Subsection 53G-8-211(2), an education entity may not refer a student to an evidence-based alternative intervention described in Subsection 53G-8-211(3) without written consent.

§ 53E-9-306. Using and deleting student data–Rulemaking–Cumulative disciplinary record.

(1) In accordance with Title 63G, Chapter 2, Government Records Access and Management Act the state board shall make rules regarding using and expunging student data, including:

(a) a categorization of cumulative disciplinary records that includes the following levels of maintenance:

(i) one year;

(ii) three years; and

(iii) except as required in Subsection (3), as determined by the education entity;

(b) the types of student data that may be expunged, including:

(i) medical records; and

(ii) behavioral test assessments; and

(c) the types of student data that may not be expunged, including:

(i) grades;

(ii) transcripts;

(iii) a record of the student's enrollment; and

(iv) assessment information.

(2) In accordance with state board rule, an education entity may create and maintain a cumulative disciplinary record for a student.

(3)(a) An education entity shall, in accordance with state board rule, expunge a student's student data that is stored by the education entity if:

(i) the student is at least 23 years old; and

(ii) the student requests that the education entity expunge the student data.

(b) An education entity shall retain and dispose of records in accordance with Section 63G-2-604 and state board rule.

§ 53E-9-307. Securing and cataloguing student data.

The state board shall make rules that:

(1) using reasonable data industry best practices, prescribe the maintenance and protection of stored student data by:

(a) an education entity; and

(b) a third-party contractor; and

(2) state requirements for an education entity's metadata dictionary.

§ 53E-9-308. Sharing student data–Prohibition–Requirements for student data manager.

(1)(a) Except as provided in Subsection (1)(b), an education entity, including a student data manager, may not share personally identifiable student data without written consent.

(b) An education entity, including a student data manager, may share personally identifiable student data:

(i) in accordance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act and related provisions under 20 U.S.C. Secs. 1232g and 1232h;

(ii) as required by federal law; and

(iii) as described in Subsections (3), (5), and (6).

(2) A student data manager shall:

(a) authorize and manage the sharing, outside of the student data manager's education entity, of personally identifiable student data for the education entity as described in this section;

(b) act as the primary local point of contact for the state student data officer described in Section 53E-9-302; and

(c) fulfill other responsibilities described in the data governance plan of the student data manager's education entity.

(3) A student data manager may share a student's personally identifiable student data with a caseworker or representative of the Department of Human Services if:

(a) the Department of Human Services is:

(i) legally responsible for the care and protection of the student, including the responsibility to investigate a report of educational neglect, as provided in Subsection 62A-4a-409(5); or

(ii) providing services to the student;

(b) the student's personally identifiable student data is not shared with a person who is not authorized:

(i) to address the student's education needs; or

(ii) by the Department of Human Services to receive the student's personally identifiable student data; and

(c) the Department of Human Services maintains and protects the student's personally identifiable student data.

(4) The Department of Human Services, a school official, or the Utah Juvenile Court may share personally identifiable student data to improve education outcomes for youth:

(a) in the custody of, or under the guardianship of, the Department of Human Services;

(b) receiving services from the Division of Juvenile Justice Services;

(c) in the custody of the Division of Child and Family Services;

(d) receiving services from the Division of Services for People with Disabilities; or

(e) under the jurisdiction of the Utah Juvenile Court.

(5)(a) A student data manager may share personally identifiable student data in response to a subpoena issued by a court.

(b) A person who receives personally identifiable student data under Subsection (5)(a) may not use the personally identifiable student data outside of the use described in the subpoena.

(6)(a) A student data manager may share student data, including personally identifiable student data, in response to a request to share student data for the purpose of research or evaluation, if the student data manager:

(i) verifies that the request meets the requirements of 34 C.F.R. Sec. 99.31(a)(6);

(ii) submits the request to the education entity's research review process; and

(iii) fulfills the instructions that result from the review process.

(b)(i) In accordance with state and federal law, and subject to Subsection (6)(b)(ii), the state board shall share student data, including personally identifiable student data, as requested by the Utah Registry of Autism and Developmental Disabilities described in Section 26-7-4.

(ii)(A) At least 30 days before the state board shares student data in accordance with Subsection (6)(b)(i), the education entity from which the state board received the student data shall provide notice to the parent of each student for which the state board intends to share student data.

(B) The state board may not, for a particular student, share student data as described in Subsection (6)(b)(i) if the student's parent requests that the state board not share the student data.

(iii) A person who receives student data under Subsection (6)(b)(i):

(A) shall maintain and protect the student data in accordance with state board rule described in Section 53E-9-307;

(B) may not use the student data for a purpose not described in Section 26-7-4; and

(C) is subject to audit by the state student data officer described in Section 53E-9-302.

§ 53E-9-309. Third-party contractors–Use and protection of student data–Contract requirements–Completion of contract–Required and allowed uses of student data–Restrictions on the use of student data–Exceptions.

(1) A third-party contractor shall use personally identifiable student data received under a contract with an education entity strictly for the purpose of providing the contracted product or service within the negotiated contract terms.

(2) When contracting with a third-party contractor, an education entity shall require the following provisions in the contract:

(a) requirements and restrictions related to the collection, use, storage, or sharing of student data by the third-party contractor that are necessary for the education entity to ensure compliance with the provisions of this part and state board rule;

(b) a description of a person, or type of person, including an affiliate of the third-party contractor, with whom the third-party contractor may share student data;

(c) provisions that, at the request of the education entity, govern the deletion of the student data received by the third-party contractor;

(d) except as provided in Subsection (4) and if required by the education entity, provisions that prohibit the secondary use of personally identifiable student data by the third-party contractor; and

(e) an agreement by the third-party contractor that, at the request of the education entity that is a party to the contract, the education entity or the education entity's designee may audit the third-party contractor to verify compliance with the contract.

(3) As authorized by law or court order, a third-party contractor shall share student data as requested by law enforcement.

(4) A third-party contractor may:

(a) use student data for adaptive learning or customized student learning purposes;

(b) market an educational application or product to a parent or legal guardian of a student if the third-party contractor did not use student data, shared by or collected on behalf of an education entity, to market the educational application or product;

(c) use a recommendation engine to recommend to a student:

(i) content that relates to learning or employment, within the third-party contractor's internal application, if the recommendation is not motivated by payment or other consideration from another party; or

(ii) services that relate to learning or employment, within the third-party contractor's internal application, if the recommendation is not motivated by payment or other consideration from another party;

(d) respond to a student request for information or feedback, if the content of the response is not motivated by payment or other consideration from another party;

(e) use student data to allow or improve operability and functionality of the third-party contractor's internal application; or

(f) identify for a student nonprofit institutions of higher education or scholarship providers that are seeking students who meet specific criteria:

(i) regardless of whether the identified nonprofit institutions of higher education or scholarship providers provide payment or other consideration to the third-party contractor; and

(ii) except as provided in Subsection (5), only if the third-party contractor obtains written consent:

(A) of a student's parent or legal guardian through the student's school or LEA; or

(B) for a student who is age 18 or older or an emancipated minor, from the student.

(5) A third-party contractor is not required to obtain written consent under Subsection (4)(f)(ii) if the third-party contractor:

(a) is a national assessment provider; and

(b)(i) secures the express written consent of the student or the student's parent; and

(ii) the express written consent is given in response to clear and conspicuous notice that the national assessment provider requests consent solely to provide access to information on employment, educational scholarships, financial aid, or postsecondary educational opportunities.

(6) At the completion of a contract with an education entity, if the contract has not been renewed, a third-party contractor shall return or delete upon the education entity's request all personally identifiable student data under the control of the education entity unless a student or the student's parent consents to the maintenance of the personally identifiable student data.

(7)(a) A third-party contractor may not:

(i) except as provided in Subsections (5) and (7)(b), sell student data;

(ii) collect, use, or share student data, if the collection, use, or sharing of the student data is inconsistent with the third-party contractor's contract with the education entity; or

(iii) use student data for targeted advertising.

(b) A person may obtain student data through the purchase of, merger with, or otherwise acquiring a third-party contractor if the third-party contractor remains in compliance with this section.

(8) A provider of an electronic store, gateway, marketplace, or other means of purchasing an external application is not required to ensure that the external application obtained through the provider complies with this section.

(9) The provisions of this section do not:

(a) apply to the use of an external application, including the access of an external application with login credentials created by a third-party contractor's internal application;

(b) apply to the providing of Internet service; or

(c) impose a duty on a provider of an interactive computer service, as defined in 47 U.S.C. Sec. 230, to review or enforce compliance with this section.

§ 53E-9-310. Penalties.

(1)(a) A third-party contractor that knowingly or recklessly permits unauthorized collecting, sharing, or use of student data under this part:

(i) except as provided in Subsection (1)(b), may not enter into a future contract with an education entity;

(ii) may be required by the state board to pay a civil penalty of up to $25,000; and

(iii) may be required to pay:

(A) the education entity's cost of notifying parents and students of the unauthorized sharing or use of student data; and

(B) expenses incurred by the education entity as a result of the unauthorized sharing or use of student data.

(b) An education entity may enter into a contract with a third-party contractor that knowingly or recklessly permitted unauthorized collecting, sharing, or use of student data if:

(i) the state board or education entity determines that the third-party contractor has corrected the errors that caused the unauthorized collecting, sharing, or use of student data; and

(ii) the third-party contractor demonstrates:

(A) if the third-party contractor is under contract with an education entity, current compliance with this part; or

(B) an ability to comply with the requirements of this part.

(c) The state board may assess the civil penalty described in Subsection (1)(a)(ii) in accordance with Title 63G, Chapter 4, Administrative Procedures Act.

(d) The state board may bring an action in the district court of the county in which the office of the state board is located, if necessary, to enforce payment of the civil penalty described in Subsection (1)(a)(ii).

(e) An individual who knowingly or intentionally permits unauthorized collecting, sharing, or use of student data may be found guilty of a class A misdemeanor.

(2)(a) A parent or student may bring an action in a court of competent jurisdiction for damages caused by a knowing or reckless violation of Section 53E-9-309 by a third-party contractor.

(b) If the court finds that a third-party contractor has violated Section 53E-9-309, the court may award to the parent or student:

(i) damages; and

(ii) costs.

§ 53G-8-202. Public school discipline policies–Basis of the policies–Enforcement.

(1) The Legislature recognizes that every student in the public schools should have the opportunity to learn in an environment which is safe, conducive to the learning process, and free from unnecessary disruption.

(2)(a) To foster such an environment, each local school board or charter school governing board, with input from school employees, parents of students, students, and the community at large, shall adopt conduct and discipline policies for the public schools in accordance with Section 53G-8-211.

(b) A district or charter school shall base its policies on the principle that every student is expected:

(i) to follow accepted standards of conduct; and

(ii) to show respect for other people and to obey persons in authority at the school.

(c)(i) On or before September 1, 2015, the state board shall revise the conduct and discipline policy models for elementary and secondary public schools to include procedures for responding to reports received through the SafeUT Crisis Line under Subsection 53B-17-1202(3).

(ii) Each district or charter school shall use the models, where appropriate, in developing its conduct and discipline policies under this chapter.

(d) The policies shall emphasize that certain behavior, most particularly behavior which disrupts, is unacceptable and may result in disciplinary action.

(3) The local superintendent and designated employees of the district or charter school shall enforce the policies so that students demonstrating unacceptable behavior and their parents understand that such behavior will not be tolerated and will be dealt with in accordance with the district's conduct and discipline policies.

§ 53G-8-205. Grounds for suspension or expulsion from a public school.

(5) Each local school board and governing board of a charter school shall prepare an annual report for the State Board of Education on:

(a) each violation committed under this section; and

(b) each action taken by the school district against a student who committed the violation.

§ 53G-8-802. State Safety and Support Program–State board duties.

(1) There is created the State Safety and Support Program.

(2) The state board shall:

(a) develop in conjunction with the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health model student safety and support policies for an LEA, including:

(i) evidence-based procedures for the assessment of and intervention with an individual whose behavior poses a threat to school safety;

(ii) procedures for referrals to law enforcement; and

(iii) procedures for referrals to a community services entity, a family support organization, or a health care provider for evaluation or treatment;

(b) provide training:

(i) in school safety;

(ii) in evidence-based approaches to improve school climate and address and correct bullying behavior;

(iii) in evidence-based approaches in identifying an individual who may pose a threat to the school community;

(iv) in evidence-based approaches in identifying an individual who may be showing signs or symptoms of mental illness;

(v) on permitted disclosures of student data to law enforcement and other support services under the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. Sec. 1232g; and

(vi) on permitted collection of student data under 20 U.S.C. Sec. 1232h and Sections 53E-9-203 and 53E-9-305;

(c) conduct and disseminate evidence-based research on school safety concerns;

(d) disseminate information on effective school safety initiatives;

(e) encourage partnerships between public and private sectors to promote school safety;

(f) provide technical assistance to an LEA in the development and implementation of school safety initiatives;

(g) in conjunction with the Department of Public Safety, develop and make available to an LEA a model critical incident response training program that includes protocols for conducting a threat assessment, and ensuring building security during an incident;

(h) provide space for the public safety liaison described in Section 53-1-106 and the school-based mental health specialist described in Section 62A-15-103;

(i) create a model school climate survey that may be used by an LEA to assess stakeholder perception of a school environment and adopt rules:

(i) requiring an LEA to:

(A) create or adopt and disseminate a school climate survey; and

(B) disseminate the school climate survey;

(ii) recommending the distribution method, survey frequency, and sample size of the survey; and

(iii) specifying the areas of content for the school climate survey; and

(j) collect aggregate data and school climate survey results from each LEA.

(3) Nothing in this section requires an individual to respond to a school climate survey.

REGULATIONS

R277-606-4. Reporting requirements and audits.

(1)(a) Beginning with the 2016-17 school year, on or before August 1, 2017 and on or before August 1 each year thereafter, an LEA shall submit a report to the Superintendent on the LEA's dropout prevention and recovery services.

(b) The report described in Subsection (1)(a) shall include:

(i) the information described in Section 53A-15-1903;

(ii) the total number of designated students in the LEA; and

(iii) if applicable, the name of a third party the LEA is contracting with to provide dropout prevention and recovery services.

(2) A third party working with an LEA on the LEA's dropout prevention and recovery program shall report any information requested by the LEA including any information required for the LEA to submit a report described in Subsection (1).

(3) The Superintendent shall:

(a) review LEA reports described in Subsection (1);

(b) by April 1 each year, inform an LEA that the LEA is required to enter into a contract with a third party as described in Subsection 53A-15-1903(3); and

(c) ensure that an LEA described in Subsection 53A-15-1903(3) and Subsection R277-606-3(3) contracts with a third party as required in Section 53A-15-1903 and Section R277-606-3.

(4)(a) An LEA shall maintain documentation to comply with the requirements of Section 53A-15-1903 and this rule.

(b) The Board or the Superintendent may request an audit of an LEA's dropout prevention and recovery program.

R277-607-3. Truancy Policy Requirements.

(1) An LEA shall:

(a) develop a truancy policy that encourages regular, punctual attendance of students, consistent with Section 53G-8-211 and Title 53G Public Education System–Local Administration, Chapter 6 Participation in Public Schools, Part 2 Compulsory Education;

(b) review the LEA's truancy policy annually;

(c) review attendance data annually and consider revisions to the truancy policy to encourage student attendance; and

(d) make the truancy policy available for review by parents or interested parties.

(2) An LEA may issue a habitual truant citation to a student consistent with the LEA's truancy policy and Section 53G-6-203.

R277-609-4. LEA responsibility to develop plans.

(3) A plan described in Subsection (1) shall include:

(f) uniform methods for at least annual school level data-based evaluations of efficiency and effectiveness;

R277-609-6. Implementation.

(8) An LEA shall have procedures for the collection, maintenance, and periodic review of documentation or records of the use of emergency safety interventions at schools within the LEA.

(9) The Superintendent shall define the procedures for the collection, maintenance, and review of records described in Subsection (8).

(10) An LEA shall provide documentation of any school, program or LEA's use of emergency safety interventions to the Superintendent annually.

R277-613-3. Superintendent Responsibilities.

(1) Subject to availability of funds, the Superintendent shall provide:

(ii) the reporting and review requirements in Section R277-613-5;

R277-613-5. Reporting and Incident Review of Allegations of Bullying, Cyber-bullying, Hazing, and Retaliation.

(1) In accordance with an action plan adopted in accordance with Subsection R277-613-4(1)(c), an LEA shall:

(a) review allegations of incidents of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation in accordance with this section; and

(b) provide an individual who reviews allegations of incidents of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation with adequate training on conducting a review.

(2)(a) An LEA shall review allegations of incidents described in Subsection (1)(a) by interviewing at least the alleged targeted individual and the individual who is alleged to have engaged in prohibited conduct.

(b) An LEA may also interview the following as part of a review:

(i) parents of the alleged targeted individual and the individual who is alleged to have engaged in prohibited conduct;

(ii) any witnesses;

(iii) school staff; and

(iv) other individuals who may provide additional information.

(c) An individual who reviews an allegation of an incident shall inform an individual being interviewed that:

(i) to the extent allowed by law, the individual is required to keep all details of the interview confidential; and

(ii) further reports of bullying will become part of the review.

(3) The confidentiality requirement in Subsection (2)(c) does not apply to:

(a) conversations with law enforcement professionals;

(b) requests for information pursuant to a warrant or subpoena;

(c) a state or federal reporting requirement; or

(d) other reporting required by this rule.

(4) In conducting a review under this section, an LEA may:

(a) review disciplinary reports of involved students; and

(b) review physical evidence, which may include:

(i) video or audio;

(ii) notes;

(iii) email;

(iv) text messages;

(v) social media; or

(vi) graffiti.

(5) An LEA shall adopt a policy outlining under what circumstances the LEA will report incidents of bullying, cyber-bullying, harassment, and retaliation to law enforcement.

(6) Following a review of a confirmed allegation of an incident of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, or retaliation, if appropriate, an LEA may:

(a) in accordance with the requirements in Subsection (6), take positive restorative justice practice action, in accordance with policies established by the LEA; and

(b) support involved students through trauma-informed practices, if appropriate.

(6)(a) An alleged targeted individual is not required to participate in a restorative justice practice with an individual who is alleged to have engaged in prohibited conduct as described in Subsection (5)(a).

(b) If an LEA would like an alleged targeted individual who is a student to participate in a restorative justice practice, the LEA shall notify the alleged targeted individual's parent of the restorative justice practice and obtain consent from the alleged targeted individual's parent before including the alleged targeted individual in the process.

(7) A grievance process required under Subsection 53G-9-605(3)(f) shall be consistent with the LEA's established grievance process.

(8) An LEA shall, as required by Subsection 53G-9-606(2), report the following annually, on or before June 30, to the Superintendent in accordance with the Superintendent's submission requirements:

(a) a copy of LEA's policy required in Section R277-613-4;

(b) implementation of the signed statement requirement described in Subsection 53G-9-605(3)(h);

(c) verification of the LEA's training of school employees relating to bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation described in Section 53G-9-607;

(d) incidents of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation; and

(e) the number of incidents described in Subsection (8)(d) that included a student who:

(i) is part of a federally protected class; or

(ii) was bullied, cyber-bullied, hazed, or retaliated against because the of the student's disability, race, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity, or sexual orientation.

Major Category
School Resource and Safety Officers (SROs/SSOs) and Truant/Attendance Officers
Sub Category
Authority and power to implement school arrest
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-6-208. Taking custody of a person believed to be a truant minor -Disposition -Receiving centers -Reports -Immunity from liability.

(1) A peace officer or public-school administrator may take a minor into temporary custody if there is reason to believe the minor is a truant minor.

(2) An individual taking a school-age minor into custody under Subsection (1) shall, without unnecessary delay, release the minor to:

(a) the principal of the minor's school;

(b) a person who has been designated by the local school board or charter school governing board to receive and return the minor to school; or

(c) a truancy center established under Subsection (5).

(3) If the minor refuses to return to school or go to the truancy center, the officer or administrator shall, without unnecessary delay, notify the minor's parents and release the minor to their custody.

(4) If the parents cannot be reached or are unable or unwilling to accept custody and none of the options in Subsection (2) are available, the minor shall be referred to the Division of Child and Family Services.

(5)(a) A local school board or charter school governing board, singly or jointly with another school board, may establish or designate truancy centers within existing school buildings and staff the centers with existing teachers or staff to provide educational guidance and counseling for truant minors. Upon receipt of a truant minor, the center shall, without unnecessary delay, notify and direct the minor's parents to come to the center, pick up the minor, and return the minor to the school in which the minor is enrolled.

(b) If the parents cannot be reached or are unable or unwilling to comply with the request within a reasonable time, the center shall take such steps as are reasonably necessary to insure the safety and well being of the minor, including, when appropriate, returning the minor to school or referring the minor to the Division of Child and Family Services. A minor taken into custody under this section may not be placed in a detention center or other secure confinement facility.

(6) Action taken under this section shall be reported to the appropriate school district. The district shall promptly notify the minor's parents of the action taken.

(7) The Utah Governmental Immunity Act applies to all actions taken under this section.

(8) Nothing in this section may be construed to grant authority to a public school administrator to place a minor in the custody of the Division of Child and Family Services, without complying with Title 62A, Chapter 4a, Part 2, Child Welfare Services, and Title 78A, Chapter 6, Part 3, Abuse, Neglect, and Dependency Proceedings.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Certification or training
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-8-702. School resource officer training–Curriculum.

(1) The state board shall make rules that prepare and make available a training program for school principals and school resource officers to attend.

(2) To create the curriculum and materials for the training program described in Subsection (1), the state board shall:

(a) work in conjunction with the State Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice created in Section 63M-7-201;

(b) solicit input from local school boards, charter school governing boards, and the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind;

(c) solicit input from local law enforcement and other interested community stakeholders; and

(d) consider the current United States Department of Education recommendations on school discipline and the role of a school resource officer.

(3) The training program described in Subsection (1) may include training on the following:

(a) childhood and adolescent development;

(b) responding age-appropriately to students;

(c) working with disabled students;

(d) techniques to de-escalate and resolve conflict;

(e) cultural awareness;

(f) restorative justice practices;

(g) identifying a student exposed to violence or trauma and referring the student to appropriate resources;

(h) student privacy rights;

(i) negative consequences associated with youth involvement in the juvenile and criminal justice systems;

(j) strategies to reduce juvenile justice involvement; and

(k) roles of and distinctions between a school resource officer and other school staff who help keep a school secure.

(4) The state board shall work together with the Department of Public Safety, the State Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice, and state and local law enforcement to establish policies and procedures that govern student resource officers.

§ 53G-8-703. Contracts between an LEA and law enforcement for school resource officer services–Requirements.

(2) If an LEA contracts with a law enforcement agency or an individual to provide SRO services at the LEA, the LEA governing board shall require in the contract:

(f) a detailed description of:

(i) job duties;

(ii) training requirements; and

(iii) other expectations of the SRO and school administration in relation to law enforcement at the LEA;

(g) that an SRO who is hired under the contract and the principal at the school where an SRO will be working, or the principal's designee, will jointly complete the SRO training described in Section 53G-8-702;

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
MOUs, authorization, and/or funding
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-6-202. Compulsory education.

(3) A school administrator, a designee of a school administrator, a law enforcement officer acting as a school resource officer, or a truancy specialist may issue a notice of compulsory education violation to a parent of a school-age child if the school-age child is absent without a valid excuse at least five times during the school year [...]

§ 53G-6-203. Truancy -Notice of truancy -Failure to cooperate with school authorities -Habitual truant citation.

(1) Except as provided in Section 53G-6-204 or 53G-6-702, a school-age minor who is enrolled in a public school shall attend the public school in which the school-age minor is enrolled.

(2) A local school board, charter school governing board, or school district may impose administrative penalties on a school-age minor in accordance with Section 53G-8-211 who is truant.

(3) A local school board or charter school governing board:

(a) may authorize a school administrator, a designee of a school administrator, a law enforcement officer acting as a school resource officer, or a truancy specialist to issue notices of truancy to school-age minors who are at least 12 years old; and

(b) shall establish a procedure for a school-age minor, or the school-age minor's parents, to contest a notice of truancy.

(4) The notice of truancy described in Subsection (3):

(a) may not be issued until the school-age minor has been truant at least five times during the school year;

(b) may not be issued to a school-age minor who is less than 12 years old;

(c) may not be issued to a minor exempt from school attendance as provided in Section 53G-6-204 or 53G-6-702;

(d) shall direct the school-age minor and the parent of the school-age minor to:

(i) meet with school authorities to discuss the school-age minor's truancies; and

(ii) cooperate with the local school board, charter school governing board, or school district in securing regular attendance by the school-age minor; and

(e) shall be mailed to, or served on, the school-age minor's parent.

§ 53G-6-207. Truancy specialists.

A local school board or charter school governing board may appoint and fix the compensation of a truancy specialist to assist in enforcing laws related to school attendance and to perform other duties prescribed by law or the state board.

§ 53G-8-701. Definitions.

As used in this part:

(1) "Law enforcement agency" means the same as that term is defined in Section 53-1-102.

(2) "School resource officer" or "SRO" means a law enforcement officer, as defined in Section 53-13-103, who contracts with or whose law enforcement agency contracts with an LEA to provide law enforcement services for the LEA.

§ 53G-8-703. Contracts between an LEA and law enforcement for school resource officer services–Requirements.

(1) An LEA may contract with a law enforcement agency or an individual to provide school resource officer services at the LEA if the LEA governing board reviews and approves the contract.

(2) If an LEA contracts with a law enforcement agency or an individual to provide SRO services at the LEA, the LEA governing board shall require in the contract:

(a) an acknowledgment by the law enforcement agency or the individual that an SRO hired under the contract shall:

(i) provide for and maintain a safe, healthy, and productive learning environment in a school;

(ii) act as a positive role model to students;

(iii) work to create a cooperative, proactive, and problem-solving partnership between law enforcement and the LEA;

(iv) emphasize the use of restorative approaches to address negative behavior; and

(v) at the request of the LEA, teach a vocational law enforcement class;

(b) a description of the shared understanding of the LEA and the law enforcement agency or individual regarding the roles and responsibilities of law enforcement and the LEA to:

(i) maintain safe schools;

(ii) improve school climate; and

(iii) support educational opportunities for students;

(c) a designation of student offenses that the SRO shall confer with the LEA to resolve, including an offense that:

(i) is a minor violation of the law; and

(ii) would not violate the law if the offense was committed by an adult;

(d) a designation of student offenses that are administrative issues that an SRO shall refer to a school administrator for resolution in accordance with Section 53G-8-211;

(e) a detailed description of the rights of a student under state and federal law with regard to:

(i) searches;

(ii) questioning; and

(iii) information privacy;

(f) a detailed description of:

(i) job duties;

(ii) training requirements; and

(iii) other expectations of the SRO and school administration in relation to law enforcement at the LEA;

(g) that an SRO who is hired under the contract and the principal at the school where an SRO will be working, or the principal's designee, will jointly complete the SRO training described in Section 53G-8-702; and

(h) if the contract is between an LEA and a law enforcement agency, that:

(i) both parties agree to jointly discuss SRO applicants; and

(ii) the law enforcement agency will accept feedback from an LEA about an SRO's performance.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Major Category
State Education Agency Support
Sub Category
State model policies and implementation support
Statute

LAWS

§ 53E-3-509. Gang prevention and intervention policies.

(1)(a) The State Board of Education shall adopt rules that require a local school board or governing board of a charter school to enact gang prevention and intervention policies for all schools within the board's jurisdiction.

(b) The rules described in Subsection (1)(a) shall provide that the gang prevention and intervention policies of a local school board or charter school governing board may include provisions that reflect the individual school district's or charter school's unique needs or circumstances.

(2) The rules described in Subsection (1) may include the following provisions:

(a) school faculty and personnel shall report suspected gang activities relating to the school and its students to a school administrator and law enforcement;

(b) a student who participates in gang activities may be excluded from participation in extracurricular activities, including interscholastic athletics, as determined by the school administration after consultation with law enforcement;

(c) gang-related graffiti or damage to school property shall result in parent or guardian notification and appropriate administrative and law enforcement actions, which may include obtaining restitution from those responsible for the damage;

(d) if a serious gang-related incident, as determined by the school administrator in consultation with local law enforcement, occurs on school property, at school related activities, or on a site that is normally considered to be under school control, notification shall be provided to parents and guardians of students in the school:

(i) informing them, in general terms, about the incident, but removing all personally identifiable information about students from the notice;

(ii) emphasizing the school's concern for safety; and

(iii) outlining the action taken at the school regarding the incident;

(e) school faculty and personnel shall be trained by experienced evidence based trainers that may include community gang specialists and law enforcement as part of comprehensive strategies to recognize early warning signs for youth in trouble and help students resist serious involvement in undesirable activity, including joining gangs or mimicking gang behavior;

(f) prohibitions on the following behavior:

(i) advocating or promoting a gang or any gang-related activities;

(ii) marking school property, books, or school work with gang names, slogans, or signs;

(iii) conducting gang initiations;

(iv) threatening another person with bodily injury or inflicting bodily injury on another in connection with a gang or gang-related activity;

(v) aiding or abetting an activity described under Subsections (2)(f)(i) through (iv) by a person's presence or support;

(vi) displaying or wearing common gang apparel, common dress, or identifying signs or symbols on one's clothing, person, or personal property that is disruptive to the school environment; and

(vii) communicating in any method, including verbal, non-verbal, and electronic means, designed to convey gang membership or affiliation.

(3) The rules described in Subsection (1) may require a local school board or governing board of a charter school to publicize the policies enacted by the local school board or governing board of a charter school in accordance with the rules described in Subsection (1) to all students, parents, guardians, and faculty through school websites, handbooks, letters to parents and guardians, or other reasonable means of communication.

(4) The State Board of Education may consult with appropriate committees, including committees that provide opportunities for the input of parents, law enforcement, and community agencies, as it develops, enacts, and administers the rules described in Subsection (1).

§ 53G-8-802. State Safety and Support Program–State board duties.

(1) There is created the State Safety and Support Program.

(2) The state board shall:

(a) develop in conjunction with the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health model student safety and support policies for an LEA, including:

(i) evidence-based procedures for the assessment of and intervention with an individual whose behavior poses a threat to school safety;

(ii) procedures for referrals to law enforcement; and

(iii) procedures for referrals to a community services entity, a family support organization, or a health care provider for evaluation or treatment;

(b) provide training:

(i) in school safety;

(ii) in evidence-based approaches to improve school climate and address and correct bullying behavior;

(iii) in evidence-based approaches in identifying an individual who may pose a threat to the school community;

(iv) in evidence-based approaches in identifying an individual who may be showing signs or symptoms of mental illness;

(v) on permitted disclosures of student data to law enforcement and other support services under the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. Sec. 1232g; and

(vi) on permitted collection of student data under 20 U.S.C. Sec. 1232h and Sections 53E-9-203 and 53E-9-305;

(c) conduct and disseminate evidence-based research on school safety concerns;

(d) disseminate information on effective school safety initiatives;

(e) encourage partnerships between public and private sectors to promote school safety;

(f) provide technical assistance to an LEA in the development and implementation of school safety initiatives;

(g) in conjunction with the Department of Public Safety, develop and make available to an LEA a model critical incident response training program that includes protocols for conducting a threat assessment, and ensuring building security during an incident;

(h) provide space for the public safety liaison described in Section 53-1-106 and the school-based mental health specialist described in Section 62A-15-103;

(i) create a model school climate survey that may be used by an LEA to assess stakeholder perception of a school environment and adopt rules:

(i) requiring an LEA to:

(A) create or adopt and disseminate a school climate survey; and

(B) disseminate the school climate survey;

(ii) recommending the distribution method, survey frequency, and sample size of the survey; and

(iii) specifying the areas of content for the school climate survey; and

(j) collect aggregate data and school climate survey results from each LEA.

(3) Nothing in this section requires an individual to respond to a school climate survey.

§ 53G-9-605. Bullying, cyber-bullying, harassment, hazing, and retaliation policy.

(1) On or before September 1, 2018, an LEA governing board shall update the LEA governing board's bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation policy to include abusive conduct.

(2) A policy shall:

(a) be developed only with input from:

(i) students;

(ii) parents;

(iii) teachers;

(iv) school administrators;

(v) school staff; or

(vi) local law enforcement agencies; and

(b) provide protection to a student, regardless of the student's legal status.

(3) A policy shall include the following components:

(a) definitions of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and abusive conduct that are consistent with this part;

(b) language prohibiting bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and abusive conduct;

(c) language prohibiting retaliation against an individual who reports conduct that is prohibited under this part;

(d) language prohibiting making a false report of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, or retaliation;

(e) as required in Section 53G-9-604, parental notification of:

(i) a student's threat to commit suicide; and

(ii) an incident of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, or retaliation, involving the parent's student;

(f) a grievance process for a school employee who has experienced abusive conduct;

(g) an action plan to address a reported incident of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, or retaliation; and

(h) a requirement for a signed statement annually, indicating that the individual signing the statement has received the LEA governing board's policy, from each:

(i) school employee;

(ii) student who is at least eight years old; and

(iii) parent of a student enrolled in the charter school or school district.

(4) A copy of a policy shall be:

(a) included in student conduct handbooks;

(b)included in employee handbooks; and

(c) provided to a parent or a guardian of a student enrolled in the charter school or school district.

(5) A policy may not permit formal disciplinary action that is based solely on an anonymous report of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, or retaliation.

(6) Nothing in this part is intended to infringe upon the right of a school employee, parent, or student to exercise the right of free speech.

§ 53G-9-606. Model policy and State Board of Education duties.

(1) On or before September 1, 2018, the state board shall:

(a) update the state board's model policy on bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation to include abusive conduct; and

(b) post the model policy described in Subsection (1)(a) on the state board's website.

(2) The state board shall require an LEA governing board to report annually to the state board on:

(a) the LEA governing board's policy, including implementation of the signed statement requirement described in Subsection 53G-9-605(3)(g);

(b) the LEA governing board's training of school employees relating to bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation described in Section 53G-9-607; and

(c) other information related to this part, as determined by the state board.

REGULATIONS

R277-609-9. Model policies.

(1) The Superintendent shall develop, review regularly, and provide to LEA boards model policies to address disruptive student behavior and appropriate consequences.

(2) The Superintendent shall provide technical assistance to LEAs in developing and implementing policies and training employees in the appropriate use of physical force and emergency safety interventions to the extent of resources available.

Sub Category
Funding appropriations
Statute

LAWS

§ 53F-5-206. Grant awards for elementary suicide prevention programs.

(1) To foster peer-to-peer suicide prevention, resiliency, and anti-bullying programs in elementary schools, the public education suicide prevention coordinator, described in Section 53G-9-702, shall, subject to legislative appropriations, award grants to elementary schools.

(2) A grant award may not exceed $500 per school per year.

(3) The application for a grant shall contain:

(a) a requested award amount;

(b) a budget; and

(c) a narrative plan of the peer-to-peer suicide prevention, resiliency, or anti-bullying program.

(4) When awarding a grant under this section, the public education suicide prevention coordinator shall consider:

(a) the content of a grant application; and

(b) whether an application is submitted in the manner and form prescribed.

§ 53G-9-702. Youth suicide prevention programs required in secondary schools–State board to develop model programs–Reporting requirements.

(6)(a) Subject to legislative appropriation, the state board may distribute money to a school district or charter school to be used to implement evidence-based practices and programs, or emerging best practices and programs, for preventing suicide in the school district or charter school.

(b) The state board shall distribute money under Subsection (6)(a) so that each school that enrolls students in grade 7 or a higher grade receives an allocation of at least $1,000.

(c)(i) A school shall use money allocated to the school under Subsection (6)(b) to implement evidence-based practices and programs, or emerging best practices and programs, for preventing suicide.

(ii) Each school may select the evidence-based practices and programs, or emerging best practices and programs, for preventing suicide that the school implements.

REGULATIONS

R277-436-3. Application, distribution of funds, and administrative support.

A. Awards shall be made to individual schools and funds allocated to charter schools or to school districts to distribute to designated schools.

B. School districts may submit a single district-wide proposal for one or more schools within the district. The proposal shall:

(1) provide for distribution of funds to individual schools; and

(2) provide explanations of prevention and intervention activities and strategies planned for individual schools.

C. Charter schools may submit independent or joint proposals.

D. School districts or charter schools or charter consortia may utilize up to ten percent of their funding under the rule for the following specific purposes:

(1) administrative oversight;

(2) professional development for licensed and non-licensed employees who work directly in gang prevention/intervention activities; and

(3) professional and technical services.

E. Proposals/applications shall be provided by the USOE.

F. Awards per school shall be based on funds available.

G. Priority shall be given to applications reflecting interagency and intra-agency collaboration.

H. Proposals receiving funding shall be notified by July 1.

I. Schools or joint school applications that were funded and complied with all requirements of law and rule may reapply in subsequent years using an abbreviated proposal form provided by the USOE.

J. The USOE may retain up to five percent of the annual legislative appropriation for the following specific purposes:

(1) an amount not to exceed 2.5 percent for:

(a) site visits; and

(b) professional development, as determined and guided by the USOE.

(2) an amount not to exceed 2.5 percent for:

(a) administrative oversight; and

(b) statewide coordination training.

R277-460-2. Authority and purpose.

A. This rule is authorized by Utah Constitution, Article X, Section 3 which vests general control and authority over public education in the Board, by Section 53G-10-405 which directs the Board to adopt rules providing for instruction on the harmful effects of controlled substances and by Section 51-9-405 which provides for funds from the Substance Abuse Prevention Account to be allocated to the USOE for:

(1) substance abuse prevention and education;

(2) substance abuse prevention training for teachers and administrators; and

(3) school district, charter school or consortia programs to supplement, not supplant, existing local prevention efforts in cooperation with local substance abuse authorities.

B. The purpose of this rule is to provide for the distribution of the USOE's share of the Substance Abuse Prevention Account.

R277-460-3. Fund allocations.

A. The USOE shall retain sufficient funds to pay for the salary, benefits and indirect costs of a .5 FTE Program Administrator at a salary level to be determined by the Board.

B. The remaining funds shall be allocated as follows:

(1) An amount not to exceed fifteen percent shall remain at the USOE to purchase educational materials to support and supplement existing Utah's Substance Abuse Prevention Program, Prevention Dimensions.

(2) An amount not to exceed fifteen percent shall remain at the USOE to encourage and support statewide substance abuse prevention training for school district/charter school teachers and administrators.

(3) An amount not to exceed fifteen percent shall remain at the USOE to promote Utah's Substance Abuse Prevention Program and encourage its classroom use by Utah educators.

(4) A minimum of fifty-five percent shall be distributed to school districts, charter schools or consortia for use by the school district, individual schools, charter schools or consortia in a cooperative substance abuse prevention effort based on application.

R277-460-4. Applications.

A. Applications shall be provided by the USOE.

B. School districts, charter schools or consortia shall submit applications to the specialist designated by the USOE.

C. The USOE specialist shall make funding recommendations to the USOE Finance Committee as soon as reasonably possible after the application deadline.

D. Awards per school districts, charter schools or consortia shall be based on funds available and specific funding amounts shall be provided in the USOE application.

E. Only applications for funding that propose projects or programs consistent with the Utah Substance Abuse Prevention Guiding Principles shall be considered for funding.

(1) Applications shall address the following:

(a) the applicant's intention to collaborate with the local substance abuse authority and community groups within the school district, including shared plans and strategies for activities and intervention;

(b) the applicant's plan for professional development and teachers' use of Prevention Dimensions materials within their classrooms;

(c) the use of funds to implement applicant's plan;

(d) teacher reports of classroom implementation and plans for classroom monitoring visits;

(e) applicant's enhancement of Prevention Dimensions with additional substance abuse activities and strategies; and

(f) applicant's implementation of Prevention Dimensions with school-based behavioral/health or coordinated school health initiatives.

F. Projects receiving funding shall be notified of funding approval by the USOE Finance Committee.

R277-460-5. Limitations on funds.

A. Funds shall be used by the USOE, school districts, charter schools and consortia exclusively for purposes set forth in Section 51-9-405.

B. Transfer of funds between line items or the extension of project completion dates may be made only with prior written approval of the USOE.

C. Funds received by school districts, charter schools or consortia shall not be used to supplant either currently available school district or charter school funds or funds available from other state or local sources.

R277-460-6. Evaluation and reports.

A. An applicant that accepts a USOE Substance Abuse Prevention award shall provide the USOE with a year-end evaluation report before July 1 of the fiscal year in which the award was made.

B. The year-end report shall include:

(1) an expenditure report;

(2) a narrative description of activities funded; and

(3) copies of all products and materials developed with USOE Substance Abuse Prevention funds.

C. The USOE may require additional evaluation or audit procedures from an award recipient to demonstrate the use of funds consistent with the law and Board rules.

R277-460-7. Waivers.

The Superintendent may grant a written request for a waiver of a requirement or deadline which a school district, charter school or consortia finds unduly restrictive.

R277-609-10. LEA compliance.

If an LEA fails to comply with this rule, the Superintendent may withhold funds in accordance with Rule R277-114 or impose any other sanction authorized by law.

R277-613-3. Superintendent Responsibilities.

(1) Subject to availability of funds, the Superintendent shall provide:

(a) a model policy on bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation as required in Section 53G-9-606;

(b) model training and training opportunities on:

(i) the prevention and identification of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation, that an LEA may use to train the LEA's employees, contract employees, and volunteers, including coaches; and

(ii) the reporting and review requirements in Section R277-613-5;

(c) evidence-based practices and policies related to the prevention of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation.

(2) Although an LEA is required to have a policy on bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, retaliation and abusive conduct as described in Section 53G-9-605 and this rule and provide training as described in Section 53G-9-607 and this rule, the LEA is not required to use the model policy or model training developed by the Superintendent described in Subsection (1).

(3) The Board may interrupt disbursements of funds consistent with Subsection 53E-3-401(8) and Rule R277-114 for failure of an LEA to comply with:

(a) Title 53G, Chapter 9, Bullying and Hazing; and

(b) this rule.

(4) In addition to the requirements of Title 53G, Chapter 9, Bullying and Hazing and this R277-613, LEAs are required to comply with applicable federal requirements.

R277-709-4. Program fiscal and accountability procedures.

(1) The Superintendent shall allocate state funds appropriated for youth in custody, including the Utah State Hospital, in accordance with Section 53E-3-503and Section 62A-15-609.

(2) Funds appropriated for youth in custody programs shall be subject to Board accounting, auditing, and budgeting rules and policies.

(3) The Superintendent shall, through an annually submitted and approved state application and plan, contract with LEAs to provide educational services for youth in custody.

(a) A contract required by Subsection (3) shall include the respective responsibilities of the Board, LEAs, and other local service providers for education

(b) An LEA may subcontract with local non-district educational service providers for the provision of educational services.

(4) The Superintendent may only contract through an RFP process with an appropriate entity if the Board Superintendent determines that the LEA where the facility is located is unable or unwilling to provide adequate education services.

(5) Youth in custody students receiving education services by or through an LEA are students of that LEA.

(6) Notwithstanding the procedures for determining an alternative district of residency in Rule R277-621, an LEA may not create an alternative district of residency for a student who has been placed in custody primarily in an attempt to receive services in a state funded youth in custody program.

(7) The Superintendent shall allocate state funds appropriated for youth in custody on the basis of an annually submitted and approved application made by the LEA where a youth in custody program resides.

(8) The Superintendent shall base the share of funds distributed to an LEA upon criteria which include:

(a) the number of youth in custody served by the LEA;

(b) the type of program required for the youth;

(c) the setting for providing services; and

(d) the length of the program.

(9) A youth in custody program shall expend funds approved for youth in custody projects solely for the purposes described in the respective funding application.

(10) The Superintendent may retain no more than five percent of the total youth in custody annual legislative appropriation for administration, oversight, monitoring, and evaluation of youth in custody programs and their compliance with law and this rule.

(11) Up to three percent of the five percent of administrative funds allowed under Subsection (9) may be withheld by the Superintendent and directed to students attending youth in custody programs for short periods of time or to new or beginning youth in custody programs or initiatives benefitting youth in custody students.

(12) The Superintendent may withhold federal or state funds for noncompliance with state policy and procedures and associated reporting timelines in accordance with Rule R277-114.

(13) The Superintendent or its designee shall develop uniform forms, deadlines, reporting and accounting procedures and guidelines to govern the youth in custody school-based programs and Utah State Hospital funded programs.

R277-709-6. Youth in custody program staffing and monitoring.

(1) Education staff assigned to youth in custody shall be qualified and appropriate for their assignments in accordance with Board licensing rules.

(2) Youth in custody programs shall maintain accreditation as part of the LEA where the programs are located consistent with Rule R277-410, Accreditation of Schools.

(3) The Superintendent shall evaluate youth in custody programs through regular site monitoring visits and monthly desk monitoring.

(4) Monitored programs shall prepare and submit to the Superintendent a written corrective action plan for each monitoring finding, as requested by the Superintendent.

(5) A youth in custody program's failure to resolve monitoring findings as soon as possible, and, in no case, later than one calendar year from date of notice, may result in the termination of state funding as provided in Rule R277-114.

(6) The Superintendent may review LEA or State Hospital records and practices for compliance with the law and this rule.

R277-709-7. Youth in custody/LEA fiscal procedures.

(1) Ten percent of state youth in custody funds or educational contract funds not expended in the current fiscal year may be carried over by eligible LEAs and spent in the next fiscal year with written approval of the Superintendent.

(2) An LEA shall submit a request to carry over funds for approval by August 1.

(3) If approved, an LEA shall detail carry over amounts in a revised budget submitted to the Superintendent no later than October 1 in the year requested.

(4) The Superintendent shall consider excess funds in determining the LEA's allocation for the next fiscal year.

(5)(a) The Superintendent shall annually recapture fund balances in excess of ten percent or $50,000 no later than February 1

(b) The Superintendent shall reallocate funds recaptured in accordance with Subsection (5)(a) to the youth in custody programs based on the criteria and procedures provided by this rule.

Major Category
Other/Uncategorized
Sub Category
Professional immunity or liability
Statute

LAWS

§ 53G-6-206. Duties of a school board, local charter board, or school district in resolving attendance problems -Parental involvement -Liability not imposed.

(1)(a) Except as provided in Subsection (1)(b), a local school board, charter school governing board, or school district shall make efforts to resolve the school attendance problems of each school-age minor who is, or should be, enrolled in the school district.

(b) A minor exempt from school attendance under Section 53G-6-204 or 53G-6-702 is not considered to be a minor who is or should be enrolled in a school district or charter school under Subsection (1)(a).

(2) The efforts described in Subsection (1) shall include, as reasonably feasible:

(a) counseling of the minor by school authorities;

(b) issuing a notice of truancy to a school-age minor who is at least 12 years old, in accordance with Section 53G-6-203;

(c) issuing a notice of compulsory education violation to a parent of a school-age child, in accordance with Section 53G-6-202;

(d) making any necessary adjustment to the curriculum and schedule to meet special needs of the minor;

(e) considering alternatives proposed by a parent;

(f) monitoring school attendance of the minor;

(g) voluntary participation in truancy mediation, if available; and

(h) providing a school-age minor's parent, upon request, with a list of resources available to assist the parent in resolving the school-age minor's attendance problems.

(3) In addition to the efforts described in Subsection (2), the local school board, charter school governing board, or school district may enlist the assistance of community and law enforcement agencies as appropriate and reasonably feasible in accordance with Section 53G-8-211.

(4) This section does not impose civil liability on boards of education, local school boards, charter school governing boards, school districts, or their employees.

(5) Proceedings initiated under this part do not obligate or preclude action by the Division of Child and Family Services under Section 78A-6-319.

§ 53G-8-303. Investigation of complaint -Confidentiality -Immunity.

(1)(a) The reporting and investigation requirements of Title 62A, Chapter 4a, Part 4, Child Abuse or Neglect Reporting Requirements, apply to complaints on corporal punishment.

(b) If a violation is confirmed, school authorities shall take prompt and appropriate action, including in-service training and other administrative action, to ensure against a repetition of the violation.

(2) Reports made on violations of this part are subject to the same requirements of confidentiality as provided under Section 62A-4a-412.

(3) Any school or individual who in good faith makes a report or cooperates in an investigation by a school or authorized public agency concerning a violation of this part is immune from any civil or criminal liability that might otherwise result by reason of those actions.

§ 53G-8-304. Liability.

(1)(a) Corporal punishment which would, but for this part, be considered to be reasonable discipline of a minor under Section 76-2-401 may not be used as a basis for any civil or criminal action.

(b) A court of competent jurisdiction may take appropriate action against any employing entity if the court finds that the employing entity has not taken reasonable steps to enforce the provisions of this part.

(2) Civil or criminal action may proceed without hindrance in the case of corporal punishment which would not be reasonable discipline under Sections 53G-8-305 and 76-2-401.

§ 53G-8-405. Liability for release of information.

(1) The district superintendent, principal, and any staff member notified by the principal may not be held liable for information which may become public knowledge unless it can be shown by clear and convincing evidence that the information became public knowledge through an intentional act of the superintendent, principal, or a staff member.

(2) A person receiving information under Subsection 78A-6-112(3)(b), 78A-6-117(1)(b), or Section 53G-8-403 is immune from any liability, civil or criminal, for acting or failing to act in response to the information unless the person acts or fails to act due to malice, gross negligence, or deliberate indifference to the consequences.

§ 53G-8-501. Definitions.

For purposes of Sections 53G-8-502 through 53G-8-504:

(1) "Educator" means a person employed by a public school, but excludes those employed by institutions of higher education.

(2) "Prohibited act" means an act prohibited by Section 53G-4-402, relating to alcohol; Section 58-37-8, relating to controlled substances; or Section 58-37a-5, relating to drug paraphernalia.

§ 53G-8-502. Mandatory reporting of prohibited acts.

If an educator has reasonable cause to believe that a student at the public school where the educator is employed has committed a prohibited act, he shall immediately report that to the school's designated educator.

§ 53G-8-503. Reporting procedure.

(1) The principal of a public school affected by this chapter shall appoint one educator as the "designated educator" to make all reports required under Sections 53G-8-501 through 53G-8-504.

(2) The designated educator, upon receiving a report of a prohibited act from an educator under Section 53G-8-502, shall immediately report the violation to the student's parent, and may report the violation to an appropriate law enforcement agency or official, in accordance with Section 53G-8-211.

(3) The designated educator may not disclose to the student or to the student's parent the identity of the educator who made the initial report.

§ 53G-8-504. Immunity from civil or criminal liability.

An educator who in good faith makes a report under Sections 53G-8-502 and 53G-8-503 is immune from any liability, civil or criminal, that might otherwise result from that action.

§ 53G-8-507. Immunity from civil or criminal liability.

Any person, official, or institution, other than a law enforcement officer or law enforcement agency, participating in good faith in making a report or conducting an investigation under the direction of school or law enforcement authorities under this part, is immune from any liability, civil or criminal, that otherwise might result by reason of that action.

§ 53G-8-510. Notification of teachers of weapons on school property -Immunity from civil and criminal liability.

(1) Whenever a student is found on school property during school hours or at a school-sponsored activity in possession of a dangerous weapon and that information is reported to or known by the principal, the principal shall notify law enforcement personnel and school or district personnel who, in the opinion of the principal, should be informed.

(2) A person who in good faith reports information under Subsection (1) and any person who receives the information is immune from any liability, civil or criminal, that might otherwise result from the reporting or receipt of the information.

REGULATIONS

No relevant regulations found.

Sub Category
Community input or involvement
Statute

LAWS

§ 53B-17-1201. Definitions.

As used in this part:

(1) “Commission” means the SafeUT and School Safety Commission established in Section 53B-17-1203.

(2) “University Neuropsychiatric Institute” means the mental health and substance abuse treatment institute within the University of Utah Hospitals and Clinics.

§ 53B-17-1202. SafeUT Crisis Line established.

The University Neuropsychiatric Institute shall:

(1) establish a SafeUT Crisis Line to provide:

(a) a means for an individual to anonymously report:

(i) unsafe, violent, or criminal activities, or the threat of such activities at or near a public school;

(ii) incidents of bullying, cyber-bullying, harassment, or hazing; and

(iii) incidents of physical or sexual abuse committed by a school employee or school volunteer; and

(b) crisis intervention, including suicide prevention, to individuals experiencing emotional distress or psychiatric crisis;

(2) provide the services described in Subsection (1) 24 hours a day, seven days a week; and

(3) when necessary, or as required by law, promptly forward a report received under Subsection (1)(a) to appropriate:

(a) school officials; and

(b) law enforcement officials.

§ 53B-17-1203. SafeUT and School Safety Commission established–Members.

(1) There is created the SafeUT and School Safety Commission composed of the following members:

(a) one member who represents the Office of the Attorney General, appointed by the attorney general;

(b) one member who represents the Utah Public Education System, appointed by the State Board of Education;

(c) one member who represents the Utah System of Higher Education, appointed by the State Board of Regents;

(d) one member who represents the Utah Department of Health, appointed by the executive director of the Department of Health;

(e) one member of the House of Representatives, appointed by the speaker of the House of Representatives;

(f) one member of the Senate, appointed by the president of the Senate;

(g) one member who represents the University Neuropsychiatric Institute, appointed by the chair of the commission;

(h) one member who represents law enforcement who has extensive experience in emergency response, appointed by the chair of the commission;

(i) one member who represents the Utah Department of Human Services who has experience in youth services or treatment services, appointed by the executive director of the Department of Human Services; and

(j) two members of the public, appointed by the chair of the commission.

(2)(a) Except as provided in Subsection (2)(b), members of the commission shall be appointed to four-year terms.

(b) The length of the terms of the members shall be staggered so that approximately half of the committee is appointed every two years.

(c) When a vacancy occurs in the membership of the commission, the replacement shall be appointed for the unexpired term.

(3)(a) The attorney general's designee shall serve as chair of the commission.

(b) The chair shall set the agenda for commission meetings.

(4) Attendance of a simple majority of the members constitutes a quorum for the transaction of official commission business.

(5) Formal action by the commission requires a majority vote of a quorum.

(6)(a) Except as provided in Subsection (6)(b), a member may not receive compensation, benefits, per diem, or travel expenses for the member's service.

(b) Compensation and expenses of a member who is a legislator are governed by Section 36-2-2 and Legislative Joint Rules, Title 5, Legislative Compensation and Expenses.

(7) The Office of the Attorney General shall provide staff support to the commission.

§ 53B-17-1204. SafeUT and School Safety Commission duties–LEA governing board duties–Fees.

(1) As used in this section:

(a) “LEA governing board” means:

(i) for a school district, the local school board;

(ii) for a charter school, the charter school governing board; or

(iii) for the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind, the State Board of Education.

(b) “Local education agency” or “LEA” means:

(i) a school district;

(ii) a charter school; or

(iii) the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind.

(2) The commission shall coordinate:

(a) statewide efforts related to the SafeUT Crisis Line; and

(b) with the State Board of Education and the State Board of Regents to promote awareness of the services available through the SafeUT Crisis Line.

(3) An LEA governing board shall inform students, parents, and school personnel about the SafeUT Crisis Line.

(4)(a) Except as provided in Subsection (4)(b), the University Neuropsychiatric Institute may charge a fee to an institution of higher education or other entity for the use of the SafeUT Crisis Line in accordance with the method described in Subsection (4)(c).

(b) The University Neuropsychiatric Institute may not charge a fee to the State Board of Education or a local education agency for the use of the SafeUT Crisis Line.

(c) The commission shall establish a standard method for charging a fee described in Subsection (4)(a).

§ 53E-3-509. Gang prevention and intervention policies.

(2) The rules described in Subsection (1) may include the following provisions:

(e) school faculty and personnel shall be trained by experienced evidence based trainers that may include community gang specialists and law enforcement as part of comprehensive strategies to recognize early warning signs for youth in trouble and help students resist serious involvement in undesirable activity, including joining gangs or mimicking gang behavior;

(4) The State Board of Education may consult with appropriate committees, including committees that provide opportunities for the input of parents, law enforcement, and community agencies, as it develops, enacts, and administers the rules described in Subsection (1).

§ 53G-8-202. Public school discipline policies–Basis of the policies–Enforcement.

(1) The Legislature recognizes that every student in the public schools should have the opportunity to learn in an environment which is safe, conducive to the learning process, and free from unnecessary disruption.

(2)(a) To foster such an environment, each local school board or charter school governing board, with input from school employees, parents of students, students, and the community at large, shall adopt conduct and discipline policies for the public schools in accordance with Section 53G-8-211.

(b) A district or charter school shall base its policies on the principle that every student is expected:

(i) to follow accepted standards of conduct; and

(ii) to show respect for other people and to obey persons in authority at the school.

(c)(i) On or before September 1, 2015, the state board shall revise the conduct and discipline policy models for elementary and secondary public schools to include procedures for responding to reports received through the SafeUT Crisis Line under Subsection 53B-17-1202(3).

(ii) Each district or charter school shall use the models, where appropriate, in developing its conduct and discipline policies under this chapter.

(d) The policies shall emphasize that certain behavior, most particularly behavior which disrupts, is unacceptable and may result in disciplinary action.

(3) The local superintendent and designated employees of the district or charter school shall enforce the policies so that students demonstrating unacceptable behavior and their parents understand that such behavior will not be tolerated and will be dealt with in accordance with the district's conduct and discipline policies.

§ 53G-9-605. Bullying, cyber-bullying, harassment, hazing, and retaliation policy.

(1) On or before September 1, 2018, an LEA governing board shall update the LEA governing board's bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation policy to include abusive conduct.

(2) A policy shall:

(a) be developed only with input from:

(i) students;

(ii) parents;

(iii) teachers;

(iv) school administrators;

(v) school staff; or

(vi) local law enforcement agencies; and

(b) provide protection to a student, regardless of the student's legal status.

(3) A policy shall include the following components:

(a) definitions of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and abusive conduct that are consistent with this part;

(b) language prohibiting bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and abusive conduct;

(c) language prohibiting retaliation against an individual who reports conduct that is prohibited under this part;

(d) language prohibiting making a false report of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, or retaliation;

(e) as required in Section 53G-9-604, parental notification of:

(i) a student's threat to commit suicide; and

(ii) an incident of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, or retaliation, involving the parent's student;

(f) a grievance process for a school employee who has experienced abusive conduct;

(g) an action plan to address a reported incident of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, or retaliation; and

(h) a requirement for a signed statement annually, indicating that the individual signing the statement has received the LEA governing board's policy, from each:

(i) school employee;

(ii) student who is at least eight years old; and

(iii) parent of a student enrolled in the charter school or school district.

(4) A copy of a policy shall be:

(a) included in student conduct handbooks;

(b)included in employee handbooks; and

(c) provided to a parent or a guardian of a student enrolled in the charter school or school district.

(5) A policy may not permit formal disciplinary action that is based solely on an anonymous report of bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, abusive conduct, or retaliation.

(6) Nothing in this part is intended to infringe upon the right of a school employee, parent, or student to exercise the right of free speech.

§ 53G-10-405. Instruction on the harmful effects of alcohol, tobacco, and controlled substances–Rulemaking authority–Assistance from the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health.

(2) At the request of the state board, the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health shall cooperate with the state board in developing programs to provide this instruction.

(3) The state board shall participate in efforts to enhance communication among community organizations and state agencies, and shall cooperate with those entities in efforts which are compatible with the purposes of this section.

REGULATIONS

R277-609-4. LEA responsibility to develop plans.

(2) An LEA shall include administration, instruction and support staff, students, parents, community council, and other community members in policy development, training, and prevention implementation so as to create a community sense of participation, ownership, support, and responsibility.

R277-609-6. Implementation.

(4)(b) An LEA shall use assessment information to connect parents and students with supportive school and community resources.

(6) An LEA shall establish an Emergency Safety Intervention (ESI) Committee before September 1, 2015.

(7) The LEA ESI Committee:

(a) shall include:

(i) at least two administrators;

(ii) at least one parent or guardian of a student enrolled in the LEA, appointed by the LEA; and

(iii) at least two certified educational professionals with behavior training and knowledge in both state rules and LEA discipline policies;

(b) shall meet often enough to monitor the use of emergency safety intervention in the LEA;

(c) shall determine and recommend professional development needs; and

(d) shall develop policies for local dispute resolution processes to address concerns regarding disciplinary actions.

R277-709-10. Coordinating council.

(1)(a) The Department of Human Services and the Board shall appoint a coordinating council in accordance with Subsection 53E-3-503(6)(a)to plan, coordinate, and recommend budget, policy, and program guidelines for the education and treatment of persons in the custody of the Division of Juvenile Justice Services and the Division of Child and Family Services.

(b) The coordinating council shall operate under guidelines developed and approved by the Department of Human Services and the Board.

(2) Coordinating council membership shall include a representative of the following:

(a) the Department of Human Services;

(b) the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health;

(c) the Division of Juvenile Justice Services;

(d) the Division of Child and Family Services;

(e) the Board;

(f) the Administrative Office of the Courts;

(g) school district superintendents; and

(h) a Native American tribe.

R277-709-11. Advisory councils.

(1)(a) Each LEA serving youth in custody shall establish a local interagency advisory council which shall be responsible for advising member agencies concerning coordination of youth in custody programs.

(b) Members of council equired under Subsection (1)(a) shall include, if applicable to the LEA, the following:

(i) a representative of the Division of Child and Family Services;

(ii) a representative of the Division of Juvenile Justice Services;

(iii) directors of agencies located in an LEA such as detention centers, secure lockup facilities, observation and assessment units, and the Utah State Hospital;

(iv) a representative of community-based alternative programs for custodial juveniles; and

(v) a representative of the LEA.

(2) A local interagency advisory council required under Subsection (1)(a) shall

(a) adopt by-laws for its operation; and

(b) meet at least quarterly.

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LAWS

§ 53B-17-1201. Definitions.

As used in this part:

(1) “Commission” means the SafeUT and School Safety Commission established in Section 53B-17-1203.

(2) “University Neuropsychiatric Institute” means the mental health and substance abuse treatment institute within the University of Utah Hospitals and Clinics.

§ 53B-17-1202. SafeUT Crisis Line established.

The University Neuropsychiatric Institute shall:

(1) establish a SafeUT Crisis Line to provide:

(a) a means for an individual to anonymously report:

(i) unsafe, violent, or criminal activities, or the threat of such activities at or near a public school;

(ii) incidents of bullying, cyber-bullying, harassment, or hazing; and

(iii) incidents of physical or sexual abuse committed by a school employee or school volunteer; and

(b) crisis intervention, including suicide prevention, to individuals experiencing emotional distress or psychiatric crisis;

(2) provide the services described in Subsection (1) 24 hours a day, seven days a week; and

(3) when necessary, or as required by law, promptly forward a report received under Subsection (1)(a) to appropriate:

(a) school officials; and

(b) law enforcement officials.

§ 53B-17-1203. SafeUT and School Safety Commission established–Members.

(1) There is created the SafeUT and School Safety Commission composed of the following members:

(a) one member who represents the Office of the Attorney General, appointed by the attorney general;

(b) one member who represents the Utah Public Education System, appointed by the State Board of Education;

(c) one member who represents the Utah System of Higher Education, appointed by the State Board of Regents;

(d) one member who represents the Utah Department of Health, appointed by the executive director of the Department of Health;

(e) one member of the House of Representatives, appointed by the speaker of the House of Representatives;

(f) one member of the Senate, appointed by the president of the Senate;

(g) one member who represents the University Neuropsychiatric Institute, appointed by the chair of the commission;

(h) one member who represents law enforcement who has extensive experience in emergency response, appointed by the chair of the commission;

(i) one member who represents the Utah Department of Human Services who has experience in youth services or treatment services, appointed by the executive director of the Department of Human Services; and

(j) two members of the public, appointed by the chair of the commission.

(2)(a) Except as provided in Subsection (2)(b), members of the commission shall be appointed to four-year terms.

(b) The length of the terms of the members shall be staggered so that approximately half of the committee is appointed every two years.

(c) When a vacancy occurs in the membership of the commission, the replacement shall be appointed for the unexpired term.

(3)(a) The attorney general's designee shall serve as chair of the commission.

(b) The chair shall set the agenda for commission meetings.

(4) Attendance of a simple majority of the members constitutes a quorum for the transaction of official commission business.

(5) Formal action by the commission requires a majority vote of a quorum.

(6)(a) Except as provided in Subsection (6)(b), a member may not receive compensation, benefits, per diem, or travel expenses for the member's service.

(b) Compensation and expenses of a member who is a legislator are governed by Section 36-2-2 and Legislative Joint Rules, Title 5, Legislative Compensation and Expenses.

(7) The Office of the Attorney General shall provide staff support to the commission.

§ 53B-17-1204. SafeUT and School Safety Commission duties–LEA governing board duties–Fees.

(1) As used in this section:

(a) “LEA governing board” means:

(i) for a school district, the local school board;

(ii) for a charter school, the charter school governing board; or

(iii) for the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind, the State Board of Education.

(b) “Local education agency” or “LEA” means:

(i) a school district;

(ii) a charter school; or

(iii) the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind.

(2) The commission shall coordinate:

(a) statewide efforts related to the SafeUT Crisis Line; and

(b) with the State Board of Education and the State Board of Regents to promote awareness of the services available through the SafeUT Crisis Line.

(3) An LEA governing board shall inform students, parents, and school personnel about the SafeUT Crisis Line.

(4)(a) Except as provided in Subsection (4)(b), the University Neuropsychiatric Institute may charge a fee to an institution of higher education or other entity for the use of the SafeUT Crisis Line in accordance with the method described in Subsection (4)(c).

(b) The University Neuropsychiatric Institute may not charge a fee to the State Board of Education or a local education agency for the use of the SafeUT Crisis Line.

(c) The commission shall establish a standard method for charging a fee described in Subsection (4)(a).

REGULATIONS

R277-217-1. Authority and purpose.

(1) This rule is authorized by:

(a) Utah Constitution Article X, Section 3, which vests general control and supervision over public education in the Board;

(b) Subsection 53E-3-401(4), which allows the Board to make rules to execute the Board's duties and responsibilities under the Utah Constitution and state law;

(c) Subsection 53E-3-501(1)(a), which directs the Board to make rules regarding the certification of educators; and

(d) Title 53E, Chapter 6, Educator Licensing and Professional Practices Act, which provides all laws related to educator licensing and professional practices.

(2) The purpose of this rule is to:

(a) establish statewide ethical standards for educators;

(b) establish reporting requirements for educators and LEAs; and

(c) recognize that educators are professionals and share common professional standards, expectations, and role model responsibilities.

R277-217-2. Prohibited conduct by an educator.

An educator may not:

(1) be convicted of a felony;

(2) be convicted of a misdemeanor offense that:

(a) adversely affects the educator's ability to perform an assigned duty and carry out the educator's responsibilities; or

(b) adversely affects the well being of students;

(3) be convicted of, or engage in conduct of a sexual nature described in Subsection 53E-6-603(2);

(4) participate in sexual, physical, or emotional harassment towards any colleague or public school-age student;

(5) engage in:

(a) a single egregious instance or pattern of inappropriate contact in any communication, including written, verbal, or electronic, with a minor, student, colleague, or member of the community; or (b) a single egregious instance or pattern of boundary violations with a student;

(6) solicit, encourage, or consummate an inappropriate relationship, whether written, verbal, or physical, with a student or minor;

(7) accept an inappropriate gift from, or give an inappropriate gift to, a student;

(8) be convicted of or commit a criminal offense involving a child, including physical abuse, cruelty, or exploitation of child;

(9) use corporal punishment, excessive physical force, or inappropriate physical restraint, except as provided in Section 53G-8-302;

(10) provide alcohol or unauthorized drugs to a student or allow a student under the educator's supervision or control to consume or obtain alcohol or unauthorized drugs;

(11) attend school or a school-related activity in an assigned employment-related capacity while possessing, using, or under the influence of alcohol or an illegal drug;

(12) attend school or a school-related activity in an assigned employment-related capacity after intentionally exceeding the prescribed dosage of a prescription medication that may impair the educator;

(13) possess or distribute an illegal drug or be convicted of any crime related to an illegal drug, including a prescription drug not specifically prescribed to the educator;

(14) be convicted of an alcohol-related offense;

(15) use or attempt to use an LEA computer or information system to access information that may be detrimental to young people or inconsistent with the educator's role model responsibility;

(16) knowingly possess, while at school or any school-related activity, any pornographic or indecent material in any form;

(17) use school equipment to intentionally view, create, distribute, or store pornographic or indecent material in any form;

(18) knowingly use, view, create, distribute, or store pornographic or indecent material involving children;

(19) expose students to material the educator knows or should have known to be inappropriate given the age and maturity of the students.

(20) violate state laws regarding the possession of a firearm while on school property or at a school-sponsored activity;

(21) knowingly allow a student to violate an LEA policy or law concerning possession or access to a weapon;

(22) interfere with or discourage a student's or colleague's legitimate exercise of constitutional, legal, or civil rights, acting consistent with the law and an LEA's policy;

(23) exclude a student from participating in any program, deny or grant any benefit to a student, or encourage a student to develop a prejudice on the basis of:

(a) race;

(b) color;

(c) creed;

(d) sex;

(e) national origin;

(f) marital status;

(g) political or religious belief;

(h) physical or mental condition;

(i) family, social, or cultural background;

(j) sexual orientation; or

(k) gender identification;

(24) knowingly or intentionally permit unauthorized collection, sharing, or use of student data;

(25) knowingly violate student confidentiality unless revealing confidential information to an authorized person serves the best interest of the student and serves a lawful purpose;

(26) violate:

(i) Title 67, Chapter 16, Utah Public Officers' and Employees' Ethics Act;

(ii) Title 53E, Chapter 9, Student Privacy and Data Protection;

(iii) Rule R277-107, Educational Services Outside of an Educator's Regular Employment; or

(iv) Section R277-120-5, Classroom Materials Developed by Utah Educators.

R277-217-3. Required conduct for an educator.

An educator shall:

(1) comply with all federal, state, and local laws;

(2) maintain a professional educator/student relationship, including by:

(a) treating a student with dignity and respect by promoting the health, safety and well being of students; and

(b) maintaining appropriate verbal, emotional and social boundaries;

(3) take prompt and appropriate action to prevent harassment or discriminatory conduct toward a student or school employee that the educator knew or should have known may result in a hostile, intimidating, abusive, offensive, or oppressive environment;

(4) take prompt and appropriate action to protect a student from any known condition detrimental to the student's physical health, mental health, safety, or learning;

(5) report suspected child abuse or neglect to law enforcement or the Division of Child and Family Services in accordance with Sections 53E-6-701 and 62A-4a-409;

(6) cooperate in providing all relevant information and evidence to the proper authority in the course of an investigation by a law enforcement agency or by the Division of Child and Family Services regarding potential criminal activity, except that an educator may decline to give evidence against himself or herself in an investigation if the evidence may tend to incriminate the educator as that term is defined by the Fifth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution;

(7) take appropriate steps to notify a student's parents and refer a student to appropriate prevention services if a student threatens suicide or self harm as required by Subsections 53E-9-203(7) and 53G-9-604(2);

(8) provide truthful, accurate, and complete information in:

(a) licensing, transfer, and employment applications or other documentation;

(b) evaluations of the educator, other educators, or students;

(c) proceedings related to educator licensure, employment, or related benefits;

(d) student IEP plans and related special education documentation;

(9) be forthcoming with truthful, accurate, and complete information to an appropriate authority regarding known educator misconduct that could adversely impact performance of a professional responsibility, by another educator;

(10) notify the Superintendent at the time of application for licensure of:

(a) current investigations involving professional misconduct in another jurisdiction;

(b) prior licensing disciplinary action in another jurisdiction; and

(c) past criminal convictions;

(11) report an arrest, citation, charge or conviction to the educator's LEA in accordance with Section R277-217-4;

(12) conduct financial business with integrity by honestly accounting for all funds committed to the educator's charge, as school responsibilities require, consistent with LEA policy;

(13) follow an LEA's fiscal policy for collecting money in connection with a school activity, accounting for all money collected, and not commingling LEA or school funds with personal funds as described in R277-113; and

(14) demonstrate honesty and integrity by strictly adhering to all state and LEA instructions and protocols in managing and administering a standardized test to a student consistent with Section 53E-4-312 and Rule R277-404.

R277-217-4. Educator reporting of arrests, citations, charges, and convictions.

(1) An educator who is arrested, cited or charged with the following alleged offenses shall report the arrest, citation, or charge within 48 hours or as soon as possible to the licensed educator's district superintendent, charter school director, or the LEA's designee, or to the Executive Secretary if not employed:

(a) any matters involving an alleged sex offense;

(b) any matters involving an alleged drug-related offense;

(c) any matters involving an alleged alcohol-related offense;

(d) any matters involving an alleged offense against the person under Title 76, Chapter 5, Offenses Against the Person;

(e) any matters involving an alleged felony offense under Title 76, Chapter 6, Offenses Against Property;

(f) any matters involving an alleged crime of domestic violence under Title 77, Chapter 36, Cohabitant Abuse Procedures Act; and

(g) any matters involving an alleged crime under federal law or the laws of another state comparable to the violations listed in Subsections (1)(a) through (f).

(2) An educator shall report any conviction or plea in abeyance for a felony or misdemeanor offense to the educator's LEA, or the Executive Secretary if not employed, within 48 hours, or as soon as possible thereafter.

(3) An LEA superintendent, director, or designee shall report conviction, arrest, or offense information received from an educator to the Superintendent within 48 hours of receipt of information from an educator.

(4) The Superintendent shall provide a form on the Board's website for reports required under this section.

(5) An educator shall report for work following an arrest and provide notice to the licensed educator's employer unless directed not to report for work by the employer, consistent with LEA policy.

R277-217-5. LEA reporting of misconduct to UPPAC.

(1) An LEA shall notify UPPAC if an educator is determined pursuant to a judicial or administrative proceeding, or internal LEA investigation, to have violated the educator standards described in Sections R277-217-2 or R277-217-3.

(2) The Executive Secretary shall provide a form for an LEA to make a notification required under Subsection (1).

(3) Upon submitting a notification under Subsection (1), an LEA may make a recommendation to the Executive Secretary concerning whether an investigation by UPPAC would be appropriate under the circumstances, taking into account any employment action taken by the LEA.

(4) If no related criminal charge is filed, an LEA is not responsible to notify UPPAC of an allegation if the LEA's internal investigation establishes that the allegation is unsupported.

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